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Best water temperature for dark roast


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@Usagercoffee Each to his own! Not a big fan of your beloved Hoffman. He has a monetised Youtube channel and therefore needs to be reaching out to generate traffic to his channel to make money. He rarely does anything in depth and therefore the conclusions he reaches are iffy. By that I mean, an in-depth review of a coffee machine may take 3 to 6 months to live with it and learn it. there are loads of times he has reviewed things and then been found to not even have known it had certain features.

Next is the ability of the individual to have taste buds good enough to detect these changes. Sure, start off with RO water and add minerals back in testing and tasting on the way. Would not work for me as I struggle to differentiate Kippers from cheese........but I am all in favour of experimentation and at least with bottled or RO water you get consistency

Edited by dfk41
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It is hard to be humble when you are as great as I am Muhammed Ali February 25, 1964

 

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38 minutes ago, Usagercoffee said:

Baking powder.

Baking Soda! They are different things!

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Current: Lelit Elizabeth / Niche Zero / VST baskets / Distilled water + 100mg NaCO3/L

Previous: Gaggia Classic | Eureka Mignon | Rocket Cellini Evo | Profitec 700 | Profitec T-64 | Gene Cafe CBR-101 | Kinu M68 | Feldgrind 2 | La Pavoni Europiccola 2012

Also at: CoffeeTime Forum & Niche Zero Owners Group

 

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On 01/08/2021 at 08:29, Usagercoffee said:

What do you guys use and how to make sure my brew is not over or under extracted according to the temperature?

Depending on the roast level my recipe can change pretty dramatically. I find the size of the french press matters quite a bit, so I'll always use a 3 cup french press when I'm only brewing a cup for myself. I use something similar to the James Hoffmann method, but I don't scoop the grinds out at the end of brewing, I just plunge down slowly, then leave it to rest for around 3-4mins. The following are examples of what my recipe might look like based off roast level:

Lighter Roast: Finer grind size, 15g of coffee to 300g of water, water at boiling point, 4mins brew time.

Darker Roast: Coaser grind size, 12g of coffee to 400g of water, water below 90C, 3mins brew time.

These recipes are very subjective. I prefer a lower dose than most recipes on the internet. Also I'm mostly grinding above the 50 mark on the Niche, a lot of people prefer a far finer grind size. Best thing to do is experiment a bit for yourself and find what you enjoy.

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4 hours ago, Usagercoffee said:

@dfk41 

I actually grind the beans myself using my (couple of years old) Niche Zero. My process is pretty simple:

  1. Grind about 30g (approximately) the beans coarse/medium (apparently best for french press)
  2. Add to the press
  3. Boil London tap (E1) water in my kettle then pour straight into press about 300mL (again approximately). Temperature measured using a TDS meter is about 92-93C.
  4. Stir for 5 seconds with spoon + let rest for about 5 to 10 minutes (time it takes me to check my emails)
  5. Filter and enjoy 

Did you get anything particular from that? 😜

 

I used to use a french press but moved to a Sowden. the technique was pretty much identical.

Pre-heat by filling with boiled water.

Dose coffee for a 1:18 ratio coffee:water.

Boil kettle again. Pour over grinds, give a swirl to mix and catch any on the sides of the filter/glass. (temp would be just off the boil)

For the Sowden you just leave it for 45 minutes. For the French Press it was a bit more involving. I can't remember the exact process but fairly certain left it for about 5 minutes and then plunge half way down to push the crust under water and then left for a further 40 minutes. 

I don't think water temperature is particularly important. It will cool so rapidly even if you pour while the kettle is still boiling that you're not above 95c for more than a few seconds, if at all.

Increasing brew ratio significantly may remove the bitterness. The bitterness is probably not because of over extraction. 

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@MarkHB

Thanks for the recipe, I will try it tonight. I am now definitely sure that I have been overdosing my brews. Quick question, how do you control the temperature of your water? Is there a better way than using a thermometer or TDS meter (with temperature probe)? My FP is limited to 400mL so I guess I need to buy a bigger one. 

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26 minutes ago, Usagercoffee said:

Thanks for the recipe, I will try it tonight. I am now definitely sure that I have been overdosing my brews. Quick question, how do you control the temperature of your water? Is there a better way than using a thermometer or TDS meter (with temperature probe)? My FP is limited to 400mL so I guess I need to buy a bigger one. 

You can try my recipe but I'm not sure you'll enjoy it given that you have been using a far higher dose. I would maybe start with one like JH recommends and see how you like it.

I use a stove top gooseneck kettle with a thermometer built into the lid. It's a brilliant thing to have, I wouldn't want to be without it.

That's the size of french press I use, so you'll only need a bigger one if you're brewing for more than one cup at a time. That, or you want a really big cup of coffee!

 

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@MarkHB

I tried your dark roast recipe and the bitterness is definitely completely gone! That said, a little light for my taste buds to be completely honest. Not having the thermometer on my kettle makes tracking temperature much harder and I found a good gooseneck kettle similar to yours on amazon. I’ll get one tonight. 

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@Rob i used @MarkHB today with his ratio being 1:20, slightly less concentrated than yours. I will give yours a shot tomorrow. Is investing in a Sowden really worth it? I am no coffee expert by no stretch of the imagination, so would the benefits be in terms of taste be worth it?

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I'm not sure there will be much difference. The Sowden keeps temperature very well and is the simplest thing you can use, it's also very easy to clean which is the main reason for going for one over am insulated french press (no plunger to dismantle and grinds to clear out from the mesh). If the press isn't insulated then differences between it and Sowden might be more significant.

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5 hours ago, Usagercoffee said:

That said, a little light for my taste buds to be completely honest.

Yeah it can be a little too light even for me at times. I'll usually up the dose over the lifetime of the beans. Also I find as the beans age, less grinds will float at the top of the press, which is apparently not a good thing for extraction, so I sometimes put a hole in the middle of the bed of grinds and pour the water right through that hole until I've reached my target weight. I find that usually helps the grinds float to the top.

Edited by MarkHB
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