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Restoration of a Faema Lambro


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The boiler is the last big thing I need to take apart for the Lambro outside of the stuck foot on the frame and the two sheared M4 panel bolts. I cleaned up the group pieces and I can start anytime to sand the aluminum parts while I search for a chrome guy with the lower group and other bits. The lever fork pin is extremely worn, this machine saw some use! Compare it to a new one I have.

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I upgraded my little heating element to heat up my citric acid solution. It has a switch now! It is safer than it looks as the circuit is also GFCI protected and I observe it when it operates. The boiler lid is still attached with 5 of the 12 bolts cut. The boiler gasket is extremelly hard and my hacksaw does not like that! I wanted to see if the citric acid could soften the gasket but so far I have no luck. I did however manage to take off the last boiler pipe after realizing the t-fitting was wide enough at the stem to fix in my vise without touching the threads post-first soaking.

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Turns out the citric acid help a little with the gasket and after about 3 hours of labor I got the lid off. The paint thinner is not needed! This is probably one of my least favorite tasks to do, probably only asbestos removal ranks worse so far. Check out the inside of the boiler lid, ther are no copper inserts for the bolts 😬 ! No wonder I could take out the element bolts (rather than studs, you can see the hex head imprint on the inside) so easily; they just crumbled away from rusting. I am pleasently surprised at the condition of the inside, mostly with the solder joints. They appear pretty solid so far but I will clean it further and observe more closely.
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Posted (edited)

Normally I will not post on just a small topic, but I am scratching my head here as I try to anaylze what is happening with the bottom of thermosyphon. To get to this point the aluminum rings needed to come off. It turned out I did not need an angle grinder but rather I simply cut through the hex nut and bolt recessed near this assembly with a hacksaw and could shear it off with a wrench after cutting three quarters through. Then I could take a punch and tap out the bolts securing the rings to the flange surface.

I was expecting some sort of solder, but after wire brushing the surface it appears to be brass that was poorly brazed? Silver solder and lead solder are definitely not this yellow (I believe). It really looks like it was just glorped around but I am not seeing signs of cracks or leaks so far. Any opinion on this analyis?

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Edited by IamOiman
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I placed my big parts order with LFspareparts. I have not dealt with them before but I am curious to see how the process goes. I am still salty Ascaso migrated and left their old site :( . I think overall I made parts orders from 4 different sites as some of them only had specific parts for the best price that outweighed the additional shipping costs.
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The pipes and fittings are all cleaned up, and are in a much better condition than before. My little Omega grinder runs at a very high rpm so I needed to be very very attentive to make sure nothing went flying or my hands got caught. 

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The boiler also got its first clean full up. I still want to see if I can remove the remaining fittings but I really do not want to damage or bend the soldering joints. I'd rather not leave them but if they fight me really hard I would consider it.
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welp, I was scrambling today when the parts order failed to go through with LFSpareparts. They did not accept my family's business number as justification since we are classified as an end-store rather than a repair shop or distributor. It worked for Ascaso but not for them 😣

I might just form my own business at this point to get that access back 😬

I managed to get all but one or two parts from other sources fortunately for similar pricing.

I dropped off my first load of panels at my metal guy to polish up. I do not have the materials to polish stainless steel, and I know it will be much easier for him to do it with his equipment. It's still cheaper than rechroming! He will also be doing my chrome. It's about the price I expected it to be but it will still hurt (about 1k), but I understand why it can cost so much. 
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Check out the effort needed to get the portafilter apart! I had to take a big flathead screwdriver and rap the handle from above for shocking the threads, follow by a big heave with a wrench attached to the square shaft. The spout was even harder to remove. It was ruined already so I needed it to come off so I could replace it.

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