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Thought this might be interesting to some of you out there, and may be an excellent cure for my evening boredom!

 

 I'll do my best to check and reply to all/any response.

 

My names Jake, I own and run Crown & Canvas Coffee Co in Staffordshire, ask me anything.

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Go on then, I'll kick things off! a couple of random questions out of my own curiosity... 

There seem to be quite a few roasters popping up here and there. Is roasting a tough market in terms of competition? Is it a saturated market at all? 

How do you choose what beans to offer? It is mostly based in seasonality? Do you try to keep a range of origins, or a range of flavours available through the year? 

So you find any beans (origins, processes or varieties) easier harder to roast than others?

What's your favourite beans you offer at the moment? 

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I see that you "show" roast level (i like this)....any idea why some other roasters don't show this (important to me) information on their websites or on the bag of coffee that comes through my door ? They show allsorts of info but not the most basic (IMO) piece of information i.e. the roast-level.

“Rincewind wasn't used to people being pleased to see him. It was unnatural, and boded no good. These people were not only cheering, they were throwing flowers and hats. The hats were made out of stone, but the thought was there.”

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10 hours ago, jaffro said:

There seem to be quite a few roasters popping up here and there. Is roasting a tough market in terms of competition? Is it a saturated market at all? 

I think the market is definitely tougher than I originally thought it would be in 2018 when I started planning C&C, throw a sprinkle of the 2020 disaster in there and it gets tougher still, but I do think theres an enormous amount of potential in the market still, a large number of cafe's we approach buy there coffee from Costco's or larger commercial grade roasters and unfortunately at times are paying over the odds for a lower quality product, and in the retail market we've seen more Sage Espresso machines flood into homes in the past year than ever before. I've been lucky that my interactions with other roasters have always been overly friendly and helpful, it doesnt come across as a competitive industry between roasters, more a large social industry where people look out for one another (from my experience) 

10 hours ago, jaffro said:

How do you choose what beans to offer? It is mostly based in seasonality? Do you try to keep a range of origins, or a range of flavours available through the year? 

I work closely with QA teams of the importers we're using on certain coffees. I try my best to catch everything as it comes into season to get the Green coffee in as fresh as possible. I work on suggestions from their team and then some choices of my own... bring in samples and cup them, focusing on what I want to get out of the coffee, am I looking for a filter/espresso, is it going to serve purpose in a blend etc. I try to keep as much available as I can without buying coffee for the sake of having that origin on the website, I've tasted some coffees from new origins to me before that I wanted to offer but the cupping samples just didnt have what I wanted at the time so I passed, Id rather offer fewer coffees but be happy with what I have on offer. 

 

10 hours ago, jaffro said:

So you find any beans (origins, processes or varieties) easier harder to roast than others?

I think the first couple roasts are always the hardest, every coffee reacts slightly differently and its learning those reactions quickly to minimise waste in the trial phase, there is an element of me on the first roast that literally drops the batch in on an average drop temp for a coffee of a similar type, notes down everything that happens and just ride it out to see how the coffee reacts. Cup it and then tune the roast from there. I find Decafs tricky to roast at times, lower density coffees can run away quite easily, you turn your head for 30 seconds and suddenly you've gone from a nice Medium roast to darker very quickly. Other than that Ive been quite lucky so far, I struggled with our Maria Genoveva in the beginning, I wanted to keep the lighter roast,  sweet acidity but the vegetal underdeveloped flavours used to really punch through, so it was a more difficult to dial in a roast profile, I'd like to think I got there in the end though!

10 hours ago, jaffro said:

What's your favourite beans you offer at the moment? 

At the moment I'm drinking alot of our Peru, mainly as a cappuccino, it literally tastes like coffee flavoured hot chocolate, super indulgent.

For Filter I'm still bouncing between the Maria and our new Ethiopian coffee, which has that silky vanilla sweetness which Im slowly falling in love with.

But in all our coffees? I still think our Guatemala Red De Mujeres is still my favourite, not just for flavour but it was one of those coffees where I roasted it, cupped it, drank it and just grinned, every step of the way it was an absolute delight to work with and I loved the results. Ill be sad to see it go as were down to our last sack but it just leaves me excited for the next crop!

 

(Hope this wasnt to wordy!)

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9 hours ago, Rumpelstiltskin said:

I see that you "show" roast level (i like this)....any idea why some other roasters don't show this (important to me) information on their websites or on the bag of coffee that comes through my door ? They show allsorts of info but not the most basic (IMO) piece of information i.e. the roast-level.

We actually didnt do this until about 4 or so months ago I think?

It was something I'd avoided because Roast level can be so ambiguous, one persons light is another persons medium, especially for people coming from commercial/supermarket beans, and alot of roasters use different scales or methods of judging it. I get emails from customers wanting to try our coffee and say things like 'I like a nice level 5' or ' 'Gold Roast'  and It just leaves me baffled. In the end it made sense to put something to at least give customers an indiciation of what we would say a medium roast is. 

In general I think alot of the info included on coffee bags can be unhelpful and confusing especially to those just looking for a bag of nice coffee, but when you take it away theres the select few that want it back!

I know a good chunk of customers arent interested in the Altitude the coffee is grown, the varietal, even the farm etc, I try to include info cards with all our single origins which condenses the majority of info into a bite size chunk, and Im definitely glad that we included Roast level as its been far more helpful than detrimental, and I think its something we will do with all our coffees in the future.

 

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39 minutes ago, Crownandcanvas said:

At the moment I'm drinking alot of our Peru, mainly as a cappuccino, it literally tastes like coffee flavoured hot chocolate, super indulgent.

I wasn't too keen on the Peru with milk - It was OK but definitely went better as an espresso than with milk. It had quite a thin body, though.

The Guatemalan you have on at the moment though is an absolute banger as a flat white and an espresso. Nothing funky, just plan, simple, good coffee.

On another note - what roasters do you have?

What tempted you to get into coffee roasting in the first place (were you a Barista before or anything prior to opening Crown & Canvas?).

Would you ever do roasting sessions/workshops? It seems as though everyone has their own unique ideas on how beans should be roasted, and as someone who wants to start home-roasting, it would be ideal to have some hands-on experience prior to committing to the expenditure (I was looking at the Cormorant CR600).

Cheers!

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Can you explain to use, the whole process of looking for a suitable bean, to buying it and the  sampling. The reason I ask this is because you might prepare a bean and know what it is capable of, but by the time it reaches us idiots who do all sorts of weird and wonderful things to it, the end result might not be what we expect!

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1 hour ago, Crownandcanvas said:

I think the market is definitely tougher than I originally thought it would be in 2018 when I started planning C&C, throw a sprinkle of the 2020 disaster in there and it gets tougher still, but I do think theres an enormous amount of potential in the market still, a large number of cafe's we approach buy there coffee from Costco's or larger commercial grade roasters and unfortunately at times are paying over the odds for a lower quality product, and in the retail market we've seen more Sage Espresso machines flood into homes in the past year than ever before. I've been lucky that my interactions with other roasters have always been overly friendly and helpful, it doesnt come across as a competitive industry between roasters, more a large social industry where people look out for one another (from my experience) 

I work closely with QA teams of the importers we're using on certain coffees. I try my best to catch everything as it comes into season to get the Green coffee in as fresh as possible. I work on suggestions from their team and then some choices of my own... bring in samples and cup them, focusing on what I want to get out of the coffee, am I looking for a filter/espresso, is it going to serve purpose in a blend etc. I try to keep as much available as I can without buying coffee for the sake of having that origin on the website, I've tasted some coffees from new origins to me before that I wanted to offer but the cupping samples just didnt have what I wanted at the time so I passed, Id rather offer fewer coffees but be happy with what I have on offer. 

 

I think the first couple roasts are always the hardest, every coffee reacts slightly differently and its learning those reactions quickly to minimise waste in the trial phase, there is an element of me on the first roast that literally drops the batch in on an average drop temp for a coffee of a similar type, notes down everything that happens and just ride it out to see how the coffee reacts. Cup it and then tune the roast from there. I find Decafs tricky to roast at times, lower density coffees can run away quite easily, you turn your head for 30 seconds and suddenly you've gone from a nice Medium roast to darker very quickly. Other than that Ive been quite lucky so far, I struggled with our Maria Genoveva in the beginning, I wanted to keep the lighter roast,  sweet acidity but the vegetal underdeveloped flavours used to really punch through, so it was a more difficult to dial in a roast profile, I'd like to think I got there in the end though!

At the moment I'm drinking alot of our Peru, mainly as a cappuccino, it literally tastes like coffee flavoured hot chocolate, super indulgent.

For Filter I'm still bouncing between the Maria and our new Ethiopian coffee, which has that silky vanilla sweetness which Im slowly falling in love with.

But in all our coffees? I still think our Guatemala Red De Mujeres is still my favourite, not just for flavour but it was one of those coffees where I roasted it, cupped it, drank it and just grinned, every step of the way it was an absolute delight to work with and I loved the results. Ill be sad to see it go as were down to our last sack but it just leaves me excited for the next crop!

 

(Hope this wasnt to wordy!)

Amazing answers! Really interested to hear your thoughts on the market. I can completely see that people are getting coffee machines for home now that they aren't buying as much coffee out. Hopefully there's a good way to tap into the new customer base and get them buying good beans rather than supermarket stuff! 

Annoyingly, your three favourite beans you offer are the three I was trying to pick between...! I'll just have to get a 250g bag of each rather than a kilo of one when I make my next order 😉

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8 hours ago, Cooffe said:

I wasn't too keen on the Peru with milk - It was OK but definitely went better as an espresso than with milk. It had quite a thin body, though.

Thanks for the feedback! I'll definitely look into this tomorrow when I'm back at the roastery and do some more tests & tasting! 

8 hours ago, Cooffe said:

The Guatemalan you have on at the moment though is an absolute banger as a flat white and an espresso. Nothing funky, just plan, simple, good coffee.

On another note - what roasters do you have?

I bloody love that coffee, So happy with it! 

So I roast on a 5KG Roastmax roaster, hooked up to some digital profiling software to accurately track our temps, gas & airflow adjustments. So I can analyse and monitor  curves on every roast, and when I have a fixed roast profile, for a coffee it makes it far easier to replicate that profile for multiple batches, day to day week to week.

8 hours ago, Cooffe said:

Would you ever do roasting sessions/workshops? It seems as though everyone has their own unique ideas on how beans should be roasted, and as someone who wants to start home-roasting, it would be ideal to have some hands-on experience prior to committing to the expenditure (I was looking at the Cormorant CR600).

This is definitely something I've considered! I think perhaps another year under my belt and sure, Thats exactly what I did when I first started getting into roasting and it was hugely helpful. I think once we've had some time away from Covid and developed the roastery itself a little more ill certainly look at having people over for sessions, I had stacks planned for our space until the pandemic. Group cupping sessions, roasting, latte art competitions for some fun, just generally try to build as much of a community around the company as I can! 

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As this is an AMA I feel I ought to ask - Which would you rather fight: one horse-sized duck, or 100 duck-sized horses?

In all seriousness though, I think it is a great thread and an excellent way of increasing transparency and getting people interested in roasting  👍

I have been meaning to order some of your coffee for ages and this has given me a shove.

David

www.blackcatcoffee.co.uk

Coffee | Espresso Machines | Grinders | Accessories

Izzo Vivi, Alex and Alex Duetto in stock now!

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8 hours ago, dfk41 said:

Can you explain to use, the whole process of looking for a suitable bean, to buying it and the  sampling. The reason I ask this is because you might prepare a bean and know what it is capable of, but by the time it reaches us idiots who do all sorts of weird and wonderful things to it, the end result might not be what we expect!

So this one may be a little lengthy but Ill do my best to cover everything I/we do! So when I'm looking for a new coffee, I have a few key things I try to lockdown in every coffee choice. 

When Im looking for a new coffee, it depends on if Im looking to add something new, or replace an existing origin.

If im looking to add something completely new (origin/process) Ill rely heavily on the Q graders recommendations, these guys and girls have such indepth knowledge with the regions they focus on that if I say "I want something really citrus fruity, bright that will work great for filter" they know what farms/regions to suggest, baring in mind some offer lists may have 50+ coffees on them from a single region, so in the time I could sample 10+ coffes and just end up overwhelmed and delay any choices. So I rely on cupscores, tasting notes, process and then if theres specific farms the QA team recommend. We normally agree on 4/5 different samples per origin we're looking to taste. They will samples roast the 30g samples to SCA cupping protocol, and then post them out to me for delivery the following day. I set up a blind cupping on the day they arrive, and normally day 4 of these samples, to compare how much change has happened in the cupping between the 4 days of rest, and normally I've eliminated 2/3 of the coffees from our choices to focus on the remainders and only cup the last 2 or 3.

The only thing that changes here if im replacing an existing coffee, is that I will add our existing coffee to the cupping, for a comparitive tasting and it gives me a baseline on what Im actually replacing too.

A very recent example I can offer is our Brazilian coffee which we chose and placed the order for last week.

Ill look over the coffees available coming in from Brazil, look at farms or regions im familiar with, if there's anything we've had in the past, and speak to the QA team to see whats stood out for them too, add some samples to our request, their team will make a couple suggestions and send them out to us.

For our Brazil I cupped 4 new samples, and a sample of our existing Brazil, the key reason why this is so important for this coffee is Brazil is a key component in our House Blend and First light, so if I went wild and picked something completely different, I may ruin how well it works in a blend, which could cause me a real headache so Im focusing on something similar in cupping profile to what we already have.

SO, once I've made my choices, we put in our order for x amount of that coffee, depending on the coffee the quanties vary and availability too. Some single origins we have access to 50+ 60KG sacks, others there may only 10 available depending on the lot. 

When the coffee arrives, we open a sack and take a small green coffee sample and take a moister reading. This is just a small QA process to check the moister percentage on the green coffee, it helps with tracking quality, and with forward thinking on the roast profile. (High moisture, theoretically longer drying phase, longer airflow adjustments etc)

Then, Ill open a blank profile on our roasting software, depending on the coffee ill go for a similar drop temp to whatever I have closest, normally between 190c and 210c, and drop a small batch of the coffee, normally 2.4kg.

I'll track the curves on our profiling software, noting everything down, when/what was turning point,  how long till the beans turn yellow, then cinnamon, when first crack happens and at what temps, what airflow and gas adjustments I made and when etc.(If any of these terms dont make sence just let me know and I can clarify!)

Once we hit first crack, using the tryer (the little scoop sticking out the front of the roaster for checking on the beans) I'll start whipping out samples, I'll have several cupping bowls lined up and just whip out little samples every 20/30 seconds, noting them down as I take them. Ill do this until we hit around 22% development on the roast and then drop whats left of the batch for more tasting and giving samples to customers if they stop by on a weekend! . (Roast development % is the percentage of the total roast time that took place after first crack) I rarely go over 22% development on any of our coffees, commonly sticking between 17-20% total development time.

Then I cup, taste taste taste and pick which sample cup I think has the best cup quality from that roast, most pronounced flavours depending on what Im actually aiming for. Ill then look, and adjust the roast profile to see if I can accentuate those flavours in any way, If I want higher acidity Im going to give it more heat in the beginning of the roast and shorten that total roast time down and reach higher temps quicker in the roast profile, If I think the acidity is too high for what I want Ill do the opposite. These are really rough generalisations too the process and everytime its a little bit different, and to be honest I'll still be making slight tweaks to roast profiles for the first 10 batches I would say, trying to perfect it as best I can, and even after that the gas/airflow will be adjusted slghtly roast to roast depending on other variables. Enviromental temp, is it my first roast of the day or has the roaster been running for 5/6 hours at this point. All these factors effect the process in small ways.

Once I've got a profile im happy with, I'll stick to it for the duration of the coffee unless anything goes abit weird with trying to match the profiles. If I'm sticking too the profile and for some reason the curves just not matching up, I'll try and ID whats going on and solve the issue without compromising flavour.

 

Nearly every roast is done to order, its roasted, bagged, stickered, sealed packed and shipped entirely by me, so Im very thankful for every order and it helps me keep a solid grip on all elements of quality. 

 

I've probably missed a bunch of stuff in here, so apologies and feel free to ask any direct questions! Apologies for the length of the reply too...I tried to cover all bases! 

 

 

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9 hours ago, Cooffe said:

What tempted you to get into coffee roasting in the first place (were you a Barista before or anything prior to opening Crown & Canvas?).

 

8 hours ago, Stu Beck said:

Can you share the story behind the C&C brand?

I thought I would try and do these two in one post!

So my journey into coffee/specialty started about 5 years ago, I used to love trying different Whiskeys and Rums, my favourite go to drink and buying from all over the world exploring they're flavours, long story short In the end knocked it all on the head, went T total and needed a new rabbit hole to go down! - I stumbled upon a little shop selling beans in my local town and was fascinated, I bought a v60 (had no idea what it was) and some of the darkest Colombian Java beans you've everseen in your life. I literally had no idea what I was doing, but that first v60 I brewed literally blew my mind, and from that moment I was hooked. Reading, searching online, buying brewing kit and beans left right and center. 

Fast forward to 2017 I was visiting my brother in Southampton and he knew I liked coffee, so he took me Winchester Coffee Roastery for a brew, and I was fascinated, The roasters on show, the community around coffee in the area, the baristas being so friendly and knowledgable. I just had to know more, so I reached out to them, made contact and became friendly and eventually booked onto a basics barista course and got my head around some espresso brewing on bar, and then eventually booked onto a Roasters course. The best I can explain it, is I've never been fascinated with food, Im fascinated by chefs. They're process, their mentaltity.

Roasting coffee is the same as brewing that first ever v60, its methodical, practical, creative and if you pay attention and do a half decent job, you might get a decent brew at the end of it ;)

But the shaming fact is Id never worked in a cafe in my life, I literally jumped in head first and was/am fueled by passion, determination and compassion really, to know that what we do can make a positive impact on our customers wholesale & retail, the farms we buy coffee from, the enviroment we work it. Its all an enormous passion that got way out of hand! ;) 

 

The branding etc came from a former project, before roasting coffee I was a Cinematographer, I filmed weddings/small commercial projects for a living and the name C&C was originally from that, I just kept it as it was burned into my brain! The Fox came from the logo design, I wanted to have something that relates to where we are and im from, the Cannock Chase is literally on my doorstep and I orginally had a stag head as the main logo, but everywhere I went I saw stag head logos and it bothered me, one night I was slaving over Photoshop trying to come up with something and looked out my office window and saw a small group of foxes playing and fighting in my back garden, and the penny dropped! 

To this day everything has been done by me inhouse, all the marketing, logo design, website building, product photos, instagram posts, you name it! Thats something im equally proud of as I am looking forward to one day hiring someone to take chunks of that off me...so I can focus on what I love. Roasting coffee for damn fine people!

 

Hope this answered you question! 

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28 minutes ago, BlackCatCoffee said:

As this is an AMA I feel I ought to ask - Which would you rather fight: one horse-sized duck, or 100 duck-sized horses?

In all seriousness though, I think it is a great thread and an excellent way of increasing transparency and getting people interested in roasting  👍

I have been meaning to order some of your coffee for ages and this has given me a shove.

David

100 duck sizes horses, I'd just hunker down and keep swinging! Hahaha

 

You're a bloody gentleman and thats greatly appreciated!

Its about time I tried some of that Chocolate point blend I hear such good things about!

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1 hour ago, Crownandcanvas said:

I've probably missed a bunch of stuff in here, so apologies and feel free to ask any direct questions! Apologies for the length of the reply too...I tried to cover all bases! 

 

 

 

That is a comprehensive, and most interesting reply, so thank you very much for taking the time to explain this to us all!

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I don't have any questions; I just wanted to say that I'm on my first order from you and absolutely loving the Guatemala for espresso and Honduras for filter. 

I also really enjoy the photos where you incorporate the physical aspect of the taste notes (and the quality of your photography in general, which some companies fall short) adds a really nice touch! 

I'll certainly be back :)

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Espresso and tasting notes.

As a newb i'm often confused with "tasting-notes"....i'm led to believe that roasters tend to quote their tasting-notes based on cupping-methods like V60, drip, filter, pour-over etc. etc but not (unless i'm mistaken) from Espresso made shots/drinks.

Your NEW Ethiopia - Mustefa Abakeno for example quotes tasting notes :- "Floral and complex with strong Vanilla's scents, Key-Lime pie and lingering Chocolate aftertaste".

The info on the page also says:- Great For - Espresso & Filter .....is the "Espresso" in this reference relating to the "actual drink taste" or to the grind-size/other ?

Some roasters show some beans and state "not-suitable-for-espresso"....why not ?

In a nutshell what i'm asking is do you (and other roasters) make an Espresso drink with the bean that says it's good for Espresso to get/arrive-at those  "tasting notes" in the example above or are the notes in the example only applicable to "Filter" ? ....."IF" the tasting notes quoted are based on Filter, then what will i taste in the example given above if i grind and pull an Espresso shot ? All of those notes; some of those notes; none of those notes ?

Apologies if i've droned on but i couldn't quite "express" it any simpler...i hope you get my gist in my newb questions above. Many thanks in advance....cool idea for a thread BTW. 😎

“Rincewind wasn't used to people being pleased to see him. It was unnatural, and boded no good. These people were not only cheering, they were throwing flowers and hats. The hats were made out of stone, but the thought was there.”

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Here's two linked ones I'll throw in:

Most boutique roasters stick with a light and medium roast, why do you think that is? Do they only buy beans that fit their preferred roast profiles?
And second, which is your most Italian-ish dark-ish roast? 

I've not gotten on with lighter side roasts myself, I prefer something on the darker side of medium out to a dark roast.

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On 21/01/2021 at 04:03, Rumpelstiltskin said:

Espresso and tasting notes.

As a newb i'm often confused with "tasting-notes"....i'm led to believe that roasters tend to quote their tasting-notes based on cupping-methods like V60, drip, filter, pour-over etc. etc but not (unless i'm mistaken) from Espresso made shots/drinks.

Your NEW Ethiopia - Mustefa Abakeno for example quotes tasting notes :- "Floral and complex with strong Vanilla's scents, Key-Lime pie and lingering Chocolate aftertaste".

The info on the page also says:- Great For - Espresso & Filter .....is the "Espresso" in this reference relating to the "actual drink taste" or to the grind-size/other ?

Some roasters show some beans and state "not-suitable-for-espresso"....why not ?

In a nutshell what i'm asking is do you (and other roasters) make an Espresso drink with the bean that says it's good for Espresso to get/arrive-at those  "tasting notes" in the example above or are the notes in the example only applicable to "Filter" ? ....."IF" the tasting notes quoted are based on Filter, then what will i taste in the example given above if i grind and pull an Espresso shot ? All of those notes; some of those notes; none of those notes ?

Apologies if i've droned on but i couldn't quite "express" it any simpler...i hope you get my gist in my newb questions above. Many thanks in advance....cool idea for a thread BTW. 😎

So I imagine some roasters do this differently, as there isnt a set standard in which tasting notes are achieved or portrayed. For me, it all happens at the cupping.

I will say that we recieve tasting notes from our green importers too, this is just so as roasters we can get in coffee samples with an idea of what were dealing with, and often when I roast a coffee Ill have their tasting notes as a refence to help me get to some results quickly. Its also helpful as a red flag, if their tasting notes say apple, citrus and floral, and Im not getting anything even close...I imagine somethings gone wrong in the roast and I need to go back to the beginning and try again/

When I've reached a roast profile im happy with, by that point we've cupped that individual coffee about 5/6 times, sometimes comparitively with previous roast profiles etc, each time there may have been a slight adjustment but Ill most likely be chasing something in the roast profile, some flavour thats muted that im trying to make more pronounced, maybe im trying to lower that acidity or up it,  when we get these flavours to a level were happy within the roast I start to develop tasting notes. 

Tasting notes for me are an wonderfully interesting nightmare, Im trying to hunt down flavour similarities that relate to what im finding in the coffee, sometimes they're really pronounced, sometimes they're more subtle. I did a little giveaway last year where I sent out a number of samples of the same coffee and asked people to taste without knowing what the coffee was, and the results were fascinating, but it was clear that the tasting notes varied massively depending on how people were brewing, which is why I stick to cupping as its in my opinion the most clear & none influenced form of brewing coffee. Just coffee and water steaping in a bowl, no filtration, no pressure, no puck prep, just simple and transparent.

 

In terms of the brewing method choices, this is again something I struggle with myself on, and Ive even changed my mind on in the past on certain coffees. These choices come down from me taking a batch of coffee and brewing it in every way I can, Chemex/v60/Frenchpress/Aeropress/Espresso - This is for QA purposes and out of curiosity to see how the coffee reacts. If I get good results in both, Ill advise both Filter and Espresso, if In my opinion one isnt so good...I wont recommend it.

NOW, I will say that this doesnt mean im right, I've had people buy our Maria Genoveva which I say is strictly a filter coffee, mainly because of the high acitity, and brew it as espresso and be happy with their results! I know people that buy our Espresso coffee blends and brew them in French press every morning, its totally subjective, and I think this is why I use the term 'Great for' because you can brew your coffee however you like, if you enjoy it, who am I to tell you otherwise? 

As for using the term 'Not suitable for' ...I guess thats just another way of me putting 'great for filter' , just in a different manor. Id suggest to everyone and anyone to brew coffee every method you can, you have no idea what you might stumble on. I've bought Espreso coffees and brewed them as Filter and had some pretty awesome cups of coffee.

 

Hope this answered your question! 

 

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www.crownandcanvas.co.uk  // Staffordshire - UK

 

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11 hours ago, allikat said:

Here's two linked ones I'll throw in:

Most boutique roasters stick with a light and medium roast, why do you think that is? Do they only buy beans that fit their preferred roast profiles?
And second, which is your most Italian-ish dark-ish roast? 

I've not gotten on with lighter side roasts myself, I prefer something on the darker side of medium out to a dark roast.

For the Light Medium roast, I think this is because alot of us are trying to showcase as much of the nautral flavours in the coffee as possible - And in my opinion the darker you take a roast the more you mute those signature charactistics, often fruit and sweetness acitiy etc, and the more you push a coffee towards a 'uniform' flavour profile, Im trying to word it in a way that isnt dismissive of darker roasts because I've had some wonderful dark roasts in the past.

Light roasts are harder to dial in, they're less forgiving, but you can get some amazing results. 

I actually roast our House Blend slightly darker that I roast their single origin components, this is because its what I mainly supply to our Wholesale partners and its in my opinon more 'accessible' to wider ranges of customer. Not every cafe has super high end machines and grinders, so if I can make their coffee supply more acessible on dial in, and still yeild great results, Im happy with that!

We dont do anything close to what I would call an Italian roast, the darkest we do I would say is on the darker edge of medium, I've never roasted a coffee that dark to drink to be honest, its just something Ive never done.

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www.crownandcanvas.co.uk  // Staffordshire - UK

 

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6 hours ago, Crownandcanvas said:

...Hope this answered your question!...

It did indeed, thank you so very much 😋

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“Rincewind wasn't used to people being pleased to see him. It was unnatural, and boded no good. These people were not only cheering, they were throwing flowers and hats. The hats were made out of stone, but the thought was there.”

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