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Facebook market place scam


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Hello, sorry if this is in the wrong section! 
Has anybody been scammed on Facebook marketplace before? If so is there anything I can do? 
A long story short I thought I purchased a Sage Dual Boiler for what I thought was a great price, but as soon as money was transferred the advert/seller and my money all disappeared. 
I’m not looking for sympathy, I was stupid and ignored the signs (of which there were a few), hindsight is a wonderful thing, the excitement of a new coffee machine clouded everything...

I was just wondering if anyone had done something similar? 
I have dealt with the bank and fraud side and am waiting to hear.

And a piece of advice for people, think first, only deal with people in person, and if you’re desperate use PayPal so you can get money back! Then think again! 

 

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8 hours ago, DanAdkin said:

If so is there anything I can do? 
 

Technically yes... You have the full might of the law to back you up...........

Realistically.... Well I think you know the answer.

Facebook market place is worse than passing your money over to a geezer in the pub.
If the geezer in the pub rips you off you might see him again and you might stand a chance (even if slim) to get some level of refund etc....

Marketplace..... Mmmmmm not so much........

I hope I'm wrong...................

 

 

 

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Was it a bank transfer? You can report it to the police and contact their bank to let them know that they've processed a fraudulent transaction, quoting the police crime ref number. I imagine that could go somewhere

 

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Yep, rules changed a while back regards bank transfers. It used to be the bank (of the scammer/recipient) had no right to deduct funds unless the account holder said so.  Now you contact your bank and explain it was a scam (it's a form of an Authorised Push Payment scam in that you authorised the payment to go but you were acting reasonably in the belief that it was a legitimate person receiving the funds), they contact the bank of the recipient where funds are put into a holding state (so the person cannot withdraw them) the recipient then has to respond to their bank explaining why the funds are theirs. It's a criminal offence to be enriched by proceeds of crime, so if the recipient is the actual fraustster then they may baulk at this point and allow funds to return rather than police involvement. It used to be that the recipient's bank just contacted them and lack of response from the account holder meant bank did nothing. Point of note, if the recipient say the funds are legitimately theirs, then the bank's don't act as judge, it's then down to you and the police etc but it does mean theirs then no way for the person to claim the hadn't realised the funds weren't really legitimate.

Down side is, they often use money mules, say a person desperate for money, tell them it's an admin job of distributing funds, the account is in the name of the mule, they withdraw cash, take a cut themselves and physically deposit cash to another account that belongs to the fraudster, so breaking the trail of where funds went. You can by now guess what industry I work in.

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It is human nature to be attracted to a "bargain". I had similar experience, to the point when I refused to do a bank transfer and things fell apart. The offer was too good to be true and yet I hoped that it might "the one".

As Michael has suggested with the bank information and police you might stand a slim chance.

Nothing succeeds as planned.

 

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10 hours ago, DanAdkin said:

And a piece of advice for people, think first, only deal with people in person, and if you’re desperate use PayPal so you can get money back! Then think again!

 

Here is another, ask people on the forum before making a purchase. Your first post below showed you were thinking about getting something else and joined a forum presumably to get advice. I always advise people to have a little patience and show some restraint rather than rushing ahead. Unfortunately people tend to rush in.

Quote

After finding and watching James Hoffman’s YouTube channel, I want to up my coffee making game, I am looking to upgrade machines, I like the look of the Sage barista line, and as I don’t have much space So I like the idea of a built in grinder. 

 

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I have bought a fair few items off facebook marketplace but I have always paid via paypal non friends and family, the price has always been reasonable, not ridiculously good and its always been for an amount I could lose without getting too grumpy. I've been lucky but there are things you can do to protect yourself. 

For anything expensive, always meet in person. Never bank transfer money to someone you don't trust. You have almost 0 protection. 

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14 hours ago, AndyDClements said:

Yep, rules changed a while back regards bank transfers. It used to be the bank (of the scammer/recipient) had no right to deduct funds unless the account holder said so.  Now you contact your bank and explain it was a scam (it's a form of an Authorised Push Payment scam in that you authorised the payment to go but you were acting reasonably in the belief that it was a legitimate person receiving the funds), they contact the bank of the recipient where funds are put into a holding state (so the person cannot withdraw them) the recipient then has to respond to their bank explaining why the funds are theirs. It's a criminal offence to be enriched by proceeds of crime, so if the recipient is the actual fraustster then they may baulk at this point and allow funds to return rather than police involvement. It used to be that the recipient's bank just contacted them and lack of response from the account holder meant bank did nothing. Point of note, if the recipient say the funds are legitimately theirs, then the bank's don't act as judge, it's then down to you and the police etc but it does mean theirs then no way for the person to claim the hadn't realised the funds weren't really legitimate.

Down side is, they often use money mules, say a person desperate for money, tell them it's an admin job of distributing funds, the account is in the name of the mule, they withdraw cash, take a cut themselves and physically deposit cash to another account that belongs to the fraudster, so breaking the trail of where funds went. You can by now guess what industry I work in.

Thank you very much, that’s a much clearer version of what the bank have said! 
I don’t hold much hope for a refund but fingers crossed! 
and yes if things do seem too good to be true they usually are! 
Thanks all for the advice

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I just had one further thought. 

The banks were required to implement a mechanism by which the sender could ensure the recipient account had a name that matched the planned recipient. This was partly to do with people not being able to key 14+ digits accurately (one digit wrong = money goes elsewhere and may be a valid account number so not get returned) and partly scams. If you made the payment after the planned due date (31st march), and if your bank didn't have such confirmation in place, then you could possibly (if the other options fail) complain that the lack of payee confirmation exposed you to this deception or at least was a large contributing factor.

e.g.  Adverts for Sage DB say your dealing with John Smith. You are told acc no and sort code, you key in sort code and acc number to your online/ mobile (or do it voa branch/telephone) and give the name of the account holder as John Smith. Their systems should (but it may not do it, they key point is that regulations say it MUST) give you a warning if the recipient account is in the name of somebody different (match = great and you'd probably go ahead, close = comfortable such as J Smith or A&A Smith,  but no match could cause you to not go ahead). So, if the bank have breached regulations and that has caused you material loss, you can complain to them, even if they don't uphold the complaint you can go to the financial ombudsman which costs them money but costs you nothing.

 

https://www.ukfinance.org.uk/confirmation-of-payee

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On 15/05/2020 at 23:54, DanAdkin said:

Hello, sorry if this is in the wrong section! 
Has anybody been scammed on Facebook marketplace before? If so is there anything I can do? 
A long story short I thought I purchased a Sage Dual Boiler for what I thought was a great price, but as soon as money was transferred the advert/seller and my money all disappeared. 
I’m not looking for sympathy, I was stupid and ignored the signs (of which there were a few), hindsight is a wonderful thing, the excitement of a new coffee machine clouded everything...

I was just wondering if anyone had done something similar? 
I have dealt with the bank and fraud side and am waiting to hear.

And a piece of advice for people, think first, only deal with people in person, and if you’re desperate use PayPal so you can get money back! Then think again! 

 

Sad to hear, I got done on Ebay 2 years ago with an iphone 8, I tried the police (NFI) tried a few online agaencies, even contemplated going to the address of the scammers, did not in the end, I too learned a huge lesson that day.

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