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I am in the UK and wish to start my journey with espresso making. I have been manually brewing coffee with a siphon and a cafetiere for a few years now with a hand grinder.

I am looking at getting a Gaggia Classic - second hand it seems you can find them in decent condition for ~£200, though I am happy to be swayed to a different option if I can understand the merit (and justify additional cost!) 

For a grinder I have been looking at the Mignon Manuale as an option as it has a stepless adjustment and is also not bank breaking. However I understand the coffee starts with the grind so here I am willing to spend a bit more money if it is worth it. I have been struggling to find shops in the UK that stock these grinders.

I was recommended the Niche Zero and I would love to buy one of these but I can't really justify £500 for a new one. However I am also of the school of thought that it's better to buy once than go cheap and buy twice.

Thank you!

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The Classic is a good starter machine, well respected and liked on the forum. Many members started with a Classic and many members stuck with them. 

Easy to maintain and parts readily available (if / when needed)

Ref grinder , have you considered second hand ?  Many members have bought S/hand and been very happy with them.  This gives the opportunity to buy a S/ H commercial grinder for less than a new Niche etc and they tend to be bullet proof.

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Hi, I'm in the same position, just bought a second hand pimped up Gaggia from the for sale forum, keep checking. As for a grinder I also bought a grinder in the same deal which I will be posting for sale soon. I bought a new hand grinder

I'm still wading through this thread

https://coffeeforums.co.uk/topic/3411-so-you’ve-just-bought-your-gaggia-classic/

Sent from my SM-G988B using Tapatalk

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1 hour ago, El carajillo said:

The Classic is a good starter machine, well respected and liked on the forum. Many members started with a Classic and many members stuck with them. 

Easy to maintain and parts readily available (if / when needed)

Ref grinder , have you considered second hand ?  Many members have bought S/hand and been very happy with them.  This gives the opportunity to buy a S/ H commercial grinder for less than a new Niche etc and they tend to be bullet proof.

The thing I am concerned with for a commercial grinder is the sheer size of a lot of them (I have quite a small kitchen) and the fact I want to single dose so I can have a decaf coffee in the evening. 

What would your recommendation be for a second hand grinder?

 

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Commercial grinders do tend to be bigger (everything is more heavy duty)  The usual/ common S/H grinder that many members go for is the Mazzer Super Jolly, used with a lens hood for single dosing or a Mazzer Mini amongst others.

Take a look in the grinder section , plenty of information there.

If you are thinking of using D-caff at night, just be aware very few grinders change easily / readily between different beans WITHOUT dialling in =the process of finely adjusting the grind to achieve correct flow through the coffee M/ch 25 -30 sec's and maintaining good taste / flavour.

Do lots of reading:good:;).

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Yeah, you may find it easier (and this may get me some hate) to get pre-ground for the decaf and brew that through a pressurised portafilter to avoid having to mess with the grind for your main daily coffee.

Mazzers are the big hit for commercial grinder conversions, but don't ignore their competitors like San marco, Compak, Ceado, Iberital and more. Some of those brands have made rebadged models for other folks. My Compak K6 is badged up Marcfi, and Cunil has made grinders with the Fracino branding on them.

Mahlkonig is... often overpriced as the EK43 has a semi-legendary status and their domestic machines are made by Baratza who, while they make good grinders, they don't last.

Sad to say, the lockdown will decimate the coffee sector, and that may be a bonus for all those seeking good gear.

Edited by allikat
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I am in the same boat.  Being at home most of the time now, I find my v60 not cutting it for my desires.  I am looking at the iberital MC2 grinder, and a Sage (Breville) duo temp.  Still doing the research to pick a machine though.

Edited by Sarzah
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On 08/04/2020 at 11:46, Duathdaert said:

I am looking at getting a Gaggia Classic - second hand it seems you can find them in decent condition for ~£200, though I am happy to be swayed to a different option if I can understand the merit (and justify additional cost!) 

Just a note on cost - I got my Classic for £100. That would be another hundred you can spend on a decent grinder (I'm yet to make that important upgrade from my barely-capable Bodum Bistro). I set up alerts on Gumtree and one or two other sites and found one within a month or two at a decent price and near enough to collect (in London); checked it wasn't the 2015 (or whichever middling version without the 3-way solenoid), and agreed on £100, given it was nearly 10 years old. 

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4 hours ago, Jony said:

Do more research welcome V60 is king.

Oh, I LOVE my v60, I just also really enjoy espresso drinks, and being stuck at home with all the cafe's closed, I am wanting more.  I will probably never get rid of my v60 and aeropress.  They are staples of my coffee addict... er, habit.

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The classic is fine for a newb. The key and biggest advantage it has, is the fact it's so well known. The design has been around in various forms for decades. Spare parts, tech info and upgrades are plentiful. Plus, if you get a worn out old one, you get to go on the adventure of cleaning it up and refurbishing it. I went on that journey myself, with a 2001 Gaggia baby, which is a Classic in a plastic case. For anyone with reasonable technical competence (the ability to follow a diagram and the knowhow to replace a car wheel with a spare is fine), getting to know quite how simple they are inside is rather calming. There's no black boxes full of electronics like in new machines, it's all old-school basic electrics.

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