Jump to content
Gilly

Anyone tried this?

Recommended Posts

Just on my second 500g bag from Asda!!

It’s not bad at all for a commercial brand. Rich, smoky and smooth with no bitter aftertaste. Classed as a medium roast, gives excellent CREMA and is well balanced.

I drink it as a black AMERICANO no sugar 14grms. run through 25 secs.09844619c65e570c5ddb4432a29cf536.jpg

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had this before and thought it was a very, very dark roast! 

It's a huge step up from instant coffee, for sure. I tend to prefer the lighter roasts from supermarkets (which typically are still medium - medium dark). I'd hate to know how dark a supermarket dark roast is! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Crema comes from all the robusta in it. And the massive caffeine content! 
I used to drink this stuff in my medical student days, particularly around exams! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, TomHughes said:

The Crema comes from all the robusta in it. And the massive caffeine content! 
I used to drink this stuff in my medical student days, particularly around exams! 

Isn’t Crema that bad tasting yet aesthetically pleasing foamy mess on top of a shot that everyone seems to chase after but ultimately lends nothing to the quality of a shot?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Mr Binks said:

Isn’t Crema that bad tasting yet aesthetically pleasing foamy mess on top of a shot that everyone seems to chase after but ultimately lends nothing to the quality of a shot?

Indeed! Crema is just a sign of a) fresh coffee or b) a tonne of robusta! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i thought this paper on crema was an informative read.

source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3140933/

 

Quote

 

What is Espresso Coffee Foam

A foam is a coarse dispersion of gas bubbles in a liquid continuous phase. In the case of espresso coffee, the gas phase is mainly the carbon dioxide generated during coffee roasting and entrapped within the cell structure, whereas the continuous phase is an oil in water (O/W) emulsion of microscopic oil droplets (90% <10 μm) in an aqueous solution of several solutes (including sugars, acids, protein-like material, and caffeine) containing solids coffee cell-wall fragments of 2–5 μm.1 The typical pure Coffea arabica regular (30 mL cup volume percolated in 30 s) espresso liquid is an O/W emulsion of 0.2–0.3% volume fraction, a suspension in which the dispersed phase is represented by about 150 mg solid coffee particles (corresponding to about 5 g/L) and a solution with total soluble solids concentration of 52.5 g/L.1

According to Dickinson,5 the espresso coffee foam (herein called crema for the sake of brevity) can be classified as a metastable foam with a specific lifetime. This is the time at which the foam disappears so as to expose the dark surface of the beverage below, which can be up to 40 min.3 During the short lifetime of crema, its structure and properties change considerably. It starts as a liquid bubbly foam in freshly prepared espresso and becomes a dry polyhedral foam on aging. The latter, however, is not of practical interest from a consumer point of view, since espresso coffee is consumed within a few minutes after preparation.

From a quantitative point of view, the crema should represent at least the 10% of the volume of an espresso.1 Foam density, as a gross indication of the gas phase content, in the range 0.40–0.60 g/mL has been reported.6 No detailed study has been published so far on crema chemical composition as well as on bubble size distribution. For the latter, the technical literature describes pure Coffea canephora (known as robusta) crema having larger bubbles than that of coffee made from pure C. arabica.7 An essentially monomodal distribution ranging from 10 to 150 μm has been reported for a regular pure C. arabica espresso.8

It has been reported that taste-wise, crema is of little sensory interest,4 although, if tasted in the absence of beverage, some bitterness and astringency can be clearly perceived.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to use it in my moka pot and cafetiere. Never really concidered trying it in my expresso machine. 


Niche Zero -- Sage DTP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About:

    Coffee Forums UK is the UK's premier coffee forum Started in June 2008 by Glenn Watson, we now have more than 22000 mainly UK based members, and welcome more than 3000 members and visitors from around the world each day! With strategic investment and digital expertise from the Jackson Lockhart team (Tait Pollack and Adam Bateman), we are taking Coffee Forums UK to the next level, and are delighted to share the journey with you.

    New Members:

    We are often referred to as the friendliest forum on the web and we look forward to welcoming you onboard.

    Terms of Use

    Advertising

    Coffee Forums Media Kit

    Buy Advertising Space

    Donate

    Get Your Supporter Badge (per year)

×
×
  • Create New...