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jirams

Tap water - Lanarkshire Scotland

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Traditionally the West of Scotland is renowned for its soft water.

I hope I don't need to bother about filtering or descaling on my new Sage DuoTemp Pro.

Anyone in this area confirm my hopes?

 

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is there a scale (or ever been) in your kettle? no? then you're probably safe...


just fix it

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Scale is never a problem in kettles or irons etc here - so espresso machines should be similar.

Thanks for response.

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Hello :)

You can ask your local water authority for an analysis ;)


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You should be able to Google your areas water report.

Wish I had softer water, it's pretty hard where I am.


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On 22/09/2019 at 12:46, jirams said:

Traditionally the West of Scotland is renowned for its soft water.

I hope I don't need to bother about filtering or descaling on my new Sage DuoTemp Pro.

Anyone in this area confirm my hopes?

 

Correct. No need at all for filtering, its probably a bit too soft for ideal coffee. I do a light descale on my machine which is on 24/7 about once every 5-10yrs or so... :)

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I'm in Cambuslang and never had a problem with scale. We have a separate tap that runs through a BWT filter (kit from Screwfix) just to remove chlorine smell and works nicely but wouldn't say it's essential. The Sage Dual Boiler water tank has a charcoal filter too obviously.

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Tap water, as Mattius2 hints, might be too good in your locale. Here in Aberdeen it measures around 50ppm*, which is really soft. Scale shouldn't be a problem but you might want to consider adding minerals to your brew water for a better tasting extraction. Google: water recipes for coffee. Ironically, you would then need to perform a regular de-scale! It's easy to try (simple recipes use Epsom salts, sodium bicarbonate, that sort of stuff) and then you'll know if the resulting taste is worth the effort; not that de-scaling is that big a chore.

Nick1881 is right, most local authorities publish the data online now. No one has an excuse to not know exactly what's going on in their water. If you are experimenting with espresso brew water (or doing most other home science) this is essential information. You might be surprised at what you find. Always one of the first things to do if you move house!

The quickest, cheapest, most effective way to remove Chlorine from water (and Chloramine, as used in Aberdeen and many places in the UK now - nasty stuff takes two weeks to breakdown and is deadly to aquatic life) is with Sodium Metabisulphite; as used by those other home-brewers. It's what Discus breeders use and Discus are apparently dead fussy about water quality.

The quantities required are so minuscule that it's difficult to make up anything less than a 4L batch at a time; e.g. a Demijohn's worth (thanks again brewers, drop in the "meta", shake the Demijohn, done). A tiny amount is needed. Maybe the size of the average pinkie-moon! Add too much and it's not a problem though sensitive palettes will taste the extra Sulphur produced (3-4ppm of Sulphur in the water after the meta does its work is normal and the taste is completely undetectable). So wind back a little until you can't taste Sulphur and that's the perfect amount!.Most folk won't have scales accurate enough to even weigh that. You can buy it in powder form on ebay cheap. A KG bag would last decades. Except for washing, I treat all my water with this stuff .

;o) Cor

ps. You can buy an accurate-enough TDS meter (measure a liquid's *Total Dissolved Solids, at least the electrically conducting ones) on ebay for £3.

Edited by Cor

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Tap water, as Mattius2 hints, might be too good in your locale. Here in Aberdeen it measures around 50ppm*, which is really soft. Scale shouldn't be a problem but you might want to consider adding minerals to your brew water for a better tasting extraction. Google: water recipes for coffee. Ironically, you would then need to perform a regular de-scale! It's easy to try (simple recipes use Epsom salts, sodium bicarbonate, that sort of stuff) and then you'll know if the resulting taste is worth the effort; not that de-scaling is that big a chore.
Nick1881 is right, most local authorities publish the data online now. No one has an excuse to not know exactly what's going on in their water. If you are experimenting with espresso brew water (or doing most other home science) this is essential information. You might be surprised at what you find. Always one of the first things to do if you move house!
The quickest, cheapest, most effective way to remove Chlorine from water (and Chloramine, as used in Aberdeen and many places in the UK now - nasty stuff takes two weeks to breakdown and is deadly to aquatic life) is with Sodium Metabisulphite; as used by those other home-brewers. It's what Discus breeders use and Discus are apparently dead fussy about water quality.
The quantities required are so minuscule that it's difficult to make up anything less than a 4L batch at a time; e.g. a Demijohn's worth (thanks again brewers, drop in the "meta", shake the Demijohn, done). A tiny amount is needed. Maybe the size of the average pinkie-moon! Add too much and it's not a problem though sensitive palettes will taste the extra Sulphur produced (3-4ppm of Sulphur in the water after the meta does its work is normal and the taste is completely undetectable). So wind back a little until you can't taste Sulphur and that's the perfect amount!.Most folk won't have scales accurate enough to even weigh that. You can buy it in powder form on ebay cheap. A KG bag would last decades. Except for washing, I treat all my water with this stuff .
;o) Cor
ps. You can buy an accurate-enough TDS meter (measure a liquid's *Total Dissolved Solids, at least the electrically conducting ones) on ebay for £3.
No regular descale needed if you add a bit of bicarb to bring the hardness up.

Laissez les bons temps rouler

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Would give a lot to have such beautiful running water as you have in Scotland down here in London..!


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