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DayZer0

BWT water jug for reducing hardness

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I don't know, but I imagine they're pretty much the same. They all (these, 3M scaleguard and others) work by replacing calcium, magnesium and heavier metal ions with hydrogen ions, thus reducing GH and KH by equal measure. I use the Brita ones as they're plentiful and cheap on that well known auction site. The Bestmax premium filters are a bit different, as they replace calcium and heavier cations with a mix of hydrogen and magnesium ones.

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I also have Thames Water's finest (Twickenham) and it's superhard. I use a plumbed in bestmax premium for the coffee machine but a Britta Jug for the kettle. The kettle develops a very fine layer of scale, enough for me to descale every 6 months or so, just to get back to the super-shiny stainless interior.

We frequently don't get around to changing the filter when instructed and it doesn't cause instant stalactites.

I doubt it will kill a coffee machine if you descale a couple of times a year,

 

I can't comment on the taste for coffee but it makes decent tea!


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Thanks.

 

Even on soft bottled water (Ashbeck specifically), should I still be descaling at least once per year?

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Thanks.

 

Even on soft bottled water (Ashbeck specifically), should I still be descaling at least once per year?

 

I doubt it would be necessary, corrosion might be more likely.


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According to the bottle spec an approximate LI equation suggests you will never need to descale using Ashbeck.

 

But keep in mind:

- It's an approximation so not always 100% accurate in all situations

- The water spec can change and doesn't always match the label

 

Corrosion doesn't look too likely with ashbeck either, pretty low chlorides and not a super low pH.

 

As a bottled water it's one of the best "set and forget" waters out there.


Spro === Compak E8 Redspeed / OE Pharos ---> The Rising Force Tamper ---> LR (IMS 35um + VST 18g) / Cafelat Robot Filter === OE Apex / OE Lido 3 ---> v60 (chemex papers) / Able brewing system / Aeropress Water === Osmio Zero

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Thank you all for your advice on this.

 

I thought it might be helpful to summarize the conclusions (from a hard tap water perspective)

 

Tap water – ‘Free’ but machine killing

Ashbeck – Machine safe, tastes ok, cheap ~£50pa, but added shopping hassle and plastic waste

Brita/BWT jugs – Cheap ~£50pa, also good for drinking. But although better than tap, fundamentally doesn’t soften London water enough to protect machine

Zero water jugs – Soft enough output to protect machine. Can/Should add minerals to make ‘perfect’ water (e.g. Third wave). Cost OK, estimated at ~£50 to 100pa. But using filter and then mixing minerals is additional hassle. Filter replacements are expensive. Reviews say filters can smell towards end of life.

RO (e.g. Osmio Zero) – Appealing plug and go solution which can also double as drinking fountain and kettle. But expensive (£400 up front plus, say £50pa for filters). Don’t really have enough kitchen space for another appliance (probably more of an issue than cost tbh)

Undersink – Seamless integrated solution with ideal water. But installation for me including a new tap and plumbing labour could be £500, plus £100pa for a new filter

 

And the winner is… Ashbeck

 

My conclusion is simply to stick to Ashbeck for the time being due to cost and convenience. I will definitely move to undersink next time I need to move house or remodel a kitchen – as a stand-alone project I can’t justify.

 

Don’t get me wrong, I really do hate the feeling of plastic waste, but you don’t get totally away from that with Zero water or even Osmio Zero (think of the raw materials going into making it and each new filter…)

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You can remineralise Zero water by mixing with tapwater. Not much hassle.
Fair point.

 

A starter kit is so cheap that I'll probably give it a go out of curiosity. I can then make better judgement on hassle and filter life.

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