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Espresso Machine!?

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Hi

I love coffee especially espresso. Recently, I bought instant espresso but it can't be compared to freshly brewed ;)

Therefore I would like to buy an espresso machine. I know they are pretty expensive and I wanted to get some recommendations or experiences first.

Do you know good brands? Is there anything else to consider?

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Hello :). There’s a LOT to consider when you are coming at it anew! Set yourself a budget for machine AND grinder plus a few accessories and if you have any other considerations to take into account and go from there.


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They are not cheap unfortunately. Tell us your budget.


GaggiaEnthusiast

 

Buying expensive equipment won't make you barista!

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If you economise on the grinder you will not get the best from a good machine, it is a marriage, they both have to work to get a good result, the choice of beans is the cheap variant and no one can tell you what bean is best as its a personal thing :coffee: and a warm welcome.

 

Jon.


One Life this is it, it's not a rehearsal so enjoy it best you can - Have some fun, buy a coffee machine.;)

 

ECM Synchronika - ECM V-Titan 64 Grinder - AMIR Scales and they work fine - 15-18-20-22-25g VST Filter Baskets - Several Jugs and a Home Made Knock Box. - Useful contributions from the Family.

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Hello and welcome!

 

As other said, make sure you come up with a budget for a machine and coffee grinder that suits your needs.

Have you read the stickies around the forum. There are some really points on all of them that can help you start understanding what your needs are.

 

Here's a good read if you have a few minutes to spare:

https://coffeeforums.co.uk/showthread.php?8150-New-Members-please-read-this-first

 

It gives a really good overview of good machines at different price points, starting from entry level machines all the way up to prosumer units

 

Good luck


ECM Syncronika, Eureka Atom 65. V60, Chemex.

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Other stuff to budget for.

Scales, tamper, knock box, cleaning stuff, and decent coffee, milk jug.

Budget on £5-6 a bag to get the from whatever you spend on the gear to make it.


I write a blog, it's nothing to do with coffee ...

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The gaggia looks pretty nice to me.

 

:)

Edited by ForumCat
factual error

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Hi

I love coffee especially espresso. Recently, I bought instant espresso but it can't be compared to freshly brewed ;)

Therefore I would like to buy an espresso machine. I know they are pretty expensive and I wanted to get some recommendations or experiences first.

Do you know good brands? Is there anything else to consider?

 

If it helps

Budget for basic machine and grinder (total)

 

  • Beginnner for basic non prosumer kit, new about £550 used about £350.
  • Almost entry level prosumer new about £900 used about £500-600.
  • Entry level prosumer new about £1100 used about £800.
  • Intermediate level prosumer new about £1750 used about £800-900.
  • Advanced Prosumer, new about £2300-2500 used about £1500-1700.
  • High end prosumer new about £3800+ used about £2500+

Edited by DavecUK

ACS Vesuvius DBPP, Izzo Duetto DB, Minima DB, Lelit Bianca Prototype DB (paddle flow control) BTC Machines: Roasters: Amazon Dalian 1kg Drum Roaster, other failed roasters: Grinders: Ceado E92, Niche US and UK: 145kg assorted greens: My reviews at https://coffeeequipmentreviews.wordpress.com/

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I'm always inclined to mention Sage to people who are buying for the first time. A route that does perhaps have it's problems but over all when some one knows nothing about espresso machines I think that balances out especially if bought with a 3 year warrantee.

 

There are a lot of Gaggia Classic users about. Interesting one - a general opinion seems to be that people want an old one not the new models produced after the company was taken over. Why older - I have no idea. In my terms all that would matter is the taste of the coffee that came out.

 

Some people buy an espresso machine - use it for a while and then decide it's not for them. If they stick with it seems pretty likely that they will at some point "upgrade" maybe in the search of ever better coffee. At that point hopefully they will know more about what the various types of machines offer.

 

The look of the machine sometimes comes into choice. Some people want something shiny with lots of bits sticking out of it. Cheaper ones of these tend to be HX machines that can mean that they have to be used in a particular way. Seems that there is another type about referred to as a dipper that people might think was an HX. New one on me and what could be called my first espresso machine years and years ago was a tiny dipper. It used the same hot water for steam and brewing coffee, no heat exchanger which is what HX means.

 

Accurate temperature is usually seen as being highly desirable. Costs of machines of any make tend to escalate when that is added one way or another. HX machines seem to need a degree of manual control of that but it seems some don't. I suspect most do.

 

Budget is important to most people. Spend as much as possible on a grinder is sometimes mentioned. I saw a different approach elsewhere - a % of budget that decreased as the machine cost went up. It's easily possible to spend more on a grinder than a machine. The reason for spending more and more on a grinder is better coffee but IMHO opinion life isn't that simple. There is lots of scope taste wise in choice of beans and what is done to them. Any machine set up within reason can produce a drink that people will like. ;) Then at some point they will probably wonder if an upgrade will improve it even more. One of my upgrades did improve things. Bit of a problem the new one used 14g of a certain bean. The earlier one used 10g. I've no idea what 14g would produce on that machine. I used another machine that is reckoned to have poor temperature control. This produced a somewhat different tasting drink but I couldn't say it was bad just different.

 

John

-


In Use Sage DB+IMS Shower Screen, Niche. Profitec T64. Others Sage BE, Mazer Mini A, Ceado 37J. Projects Little Gem, Gaggia M7D

:pToo many filter baskets - maybe. For sale when I get round to it. Robur Elect, Ceado 37J, Ascaso i_1,Piccino

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I'm always inclined to mention Sage to people who are buying for the first time. A route that does perhaps have it's problems but over all when some one knows nothing about espresso machines I think that balances out especially if bought with a 3 year warrantee.

 

There are a lot of Gaggia Classic users about. Interesting one - a general opinion seems to be that people want an old one not the new models produced after the company was taken over. Why older - I have no idea. In my terms all that would matter is the taste of the coffee that came out.

 

Some people buy an espresso machine - use it for a while and then decide it's not for them. If they stick with it seems pretty likely that they will at some point "upgrade" maybe in the search of ever better coffee. At that point hopefully they will know more about what the various types of machines offer.

 

The look of the machine sometimes comes into choice. Some people want something shiny with lots of bits sticking out of it. Cheaper ones of these tend to be HX machines that can mean that they have to be used in a particular way. Seems that there is another type about referred to as a dipper that people might think was an HX. New one on me and what could be called my first espresso machine years and years ago was a tiny dipper. It used the same hot water for steam and brewing coffee, no heat exchanger which is what HX means.

 

Accurate temperature is usually seen as being highly desirable. Costs of machines of any make tend to escalate when that is added one way or another. HX machines seem to need a degree of manual control of that but it seems some don't. I suspect most do.

 

Budget is important to most people. Spend as much as possible on a grinder is sometimes mentioned. I saw a different approach elsewhere - a % of budget that decreased as the machine cost went up. It's easily possible to spend more on a grinder than a machine. The reason for spending more and more on a grinder is better coffee but IMHO opinion life isn't that simple. There is lots of scope taste wise in choice of beans and what is done to them. Any machine set up within reason can produce a drink that people will like. ;) Then at some point they will probably wonder if an upgrade will improve it even more. One of my upgrades did improve things. Bit of a problem the new one used 14g of a certain bean. The earlier one used 10g. I've no idea what 14g would produce on that machine. I used another machine that is reckoned to have poor temperature control. This produced a somewhat different tasting drink but I couldn't say it was bad just different.

 

John

-

 

I second what John said about Sage - had my Sage DTP as my first personal machine for a year now with zero problems. Also bought a Sage SGP 2nd hand from this forum and that has been fault free too. Whatever you buy, a bit of TLC and care goes a long way.


Sage Duo Temp Pro. Sage Smart Grinder Pro. Bike Hub Tamper with Euro Curved Base. Naked Portafilter Joey Handle.

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I second what John said about Sage - had my Sage DTP as my first personal machine for a year now with zero problems. Also bought a Sage SGP 2nd hand from this forum and that has been fault free too. Whatever you buy, a bit of TLC and care goes a long way.

 

:) I see Sage as a safe pair of hands for the uninitiated. As no one has mentioned them and trying to be fair. Problems are pretty well known.

 

Looks like Breville put a block on the sale of many spares some time ago and more recently in the UK. This relates to internal spares for DIY repairs. On the other hand for people who can't for one reason or the other do these themselves it's not that easy to compare makes. Calling out any engineer to do a repair wont be that cheap. Take it to one and leave it and it's likely to be cheaper or fixed on the spot. Sage do not seem to offer a service option and as some parts are very Sage specific they may have to be involved. I managed to find service kits for 800 and 900 series without any problems so there is some scope for DIY hopefully with correctly sized parts. Google brings them up.

 

The other one is filter basket sizes on the BE and DTP or any others they may supply using their smaller size of basket. Other makers use the same tamper size but there baskets wont fit Sage machines without modification. Not much of a problem if some one is skilled with pliers or has a lathe but still limiting. The DB and others that use the standard 58mm tamper sized baskets are more widely available but say some one buys an X gram basket they are likely to find that it needs to hold more than the X indicates.

 

They have recently introduced what could be a Sage specific water filter which will increase running costs. Some might switch to certain brands of bottled water and not use a filter at all as an alternative. There manual may suggest doing that anyway if the live in a harder water area even with the filter. A number of people with different machines use bottled water anyway One thing in Sage's favour is that all are easy to descale - not sure if I would be inclined to use any type of filter after descaler has run through it.

 

John

-


In Use Sage DB+IMS Shower Screen, Niche. Profitec T64. Others Sage BE, Mazer Mini A, Ceado 37J. Projects Little Gem, Gaggia M7D

:pToo many filter baskets - maybe. For sale when I get round to it. Robur Elect, Ceado 37J, Ascaso i_1,Piccino

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