Jump to content
fatboyslim

LSOL July - Cartwheel [Nottingham]

Recommended Posts

Last update was a day or 2 ago waiting on cartwheel to make the big reveal so you still have time to guess.

 

My first guess was An Ethiopia Natural. So I’m going Bolivia Natural as a curve ball guess.


Sage DB; Mazzer Major; VST 15g, 18g & 20g Baskets;TORR Trapez & Perger Tamper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My first guess was An Ethiopia Natural. So I’m going Bolivia Natural as a curve ball guess.
Think just about everyone is thinking 'they wouldn't do 3 ethiopian naturals in a row would they?'.

Laissez les bons temps rouler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Think just about everyone is thinking 'they wouldn't do 3 ethiopian naturals in a row would they?'.

 

Lol, it pretty much why I’m going curve ball.....it’s an Ethiopian isn’t it


Sage DB; Mazzer Major; VST 15g, 18g & 20g Baskets;TORR Trapez & Perger Tamper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don’t think it’s an Ethiopian natural - but another African natural is my guess. Where? Beats me. Rwanda.


Nuova Simonelli Oscar II // Macap MXD //

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, Alex from Cartwheel has written us a thesis. I can't wait to read it but I'm too tired right now.

Probably have to post in multiple parts so here it goes...

 

First of all, I’d just like to say that I’m very grateful to hear that so many of you enjoyed your coffee! It’s a real pleasure to hear such detailed feedback. Most days, we don’t get to participate so closely in your enjoyment. So... Thank you!

 

 

 

Well, nearly all of you have guessed correctly to some extent. This is indeed a naturally processed coffee And... you have all drunk something similar recently! I can reveal... that this is not Lot 1 but the main crop from Mormora. So, it is an Ethiopian Natural from Guji. Well done to those of you who guessed.

 

 

 

The complexity of this coffee is one of the reasons that we love it so much! Complexity can be defined in a couple of ways and one of those is being able to identify clear origin characteristics in a cup’s flavour profile - nearly all of you identified it as a characteristic the first time you tasted it. In my opinion, Ethiopia produces the finest African naturals, and this is one that has a distinct Guji profile - which is cleaner and less funky than typical lots from Yirgacheffe. As with many Ethiopian naturals, the leading flavour is a strawberry/blueberry. It’s not just one dimensional however... it has a juicy and sweet stone-fruit acidity. For those of you thinking, peaches and cream, nectarine, apricot; yes... that’s where we’re headed. The coffee hits you with a viscous creamy mouthfeel. Lastly, our experience of this coffee in the aftertaste was distinctly nutty; admittedly, it was more so when we cupped/brewed it with tap water (an important trial - since so many people will drink coffee with tap water). Our experience is that nuttier flavours seem to be so much more prominent when brewed with tap water - it’s perhaps the dulling of other flavours and a muting of acidity that brings out this characteristic. It was there with our usual brewing/cupping water too of course, just less prominent.

 

I was surprised to hear that we’d unwittingly chosen the same coffee as your previous month’s roaster [FBS - so was I!]. We cupped through many coffees in May looking specifically for one that we felt was both exquisite and had particular attributes that make up something suitable for an omni-roast.

 

We settled on this coffee, cupped and recupped it and then drank the dregs... and decided that this was the one. It was only on the reveal to Mark that we found out that Long and Short had roasted coffee from the same farm as us, for you. The beans are processed much in the same way... I won’t bore you with how many hours they were fermented for or give you standard info from the producer’s sheet, but I’ll try and share some different information with you that might be of interest. Your last coffee I'm led to believe was labelled as Lot 1 and was the first lot of this coffee from Ato Esmael into the country. The coffee we bring to you is from the main harvest. Coffee ripens at different rates on the tree ������. Some beans are still green when others have fully ripened. A producer will do what is called a ‘pass’ on their trees and select only the ripe cherries. They’ll do multiple passes during the picking season and as a general rule of thumb, coffee that ripens later in the season has a slower rate of maturation and takes more time to develop. This can be for a number of reasons. My understanding is that the biggest influence on the maturation rate of cherries in similar conditions is the temperature (which is why high altitude and shade-grown are popular buzz words - and for good reason!); a cherry that is more exposed to the sun and hotter temperatures will ripen faster - a cherry that is grown at 2100m as opposed to 1600m (same farm, same day etc) will experience about 5 deg C difference in temperature and will therefore mature faster. Beans that develop more slowly develop a denser cell structure, and they spend more time photosynthesising. ☀️ + co2 + h2o = glucose + oxygen. The extra time during ripening allows for the production of carbohydrate (like glucose) and other organic matter. This lends itself well to producing coffees with a higher cup quality, more sweetness, more acidity and more flavour. In this instance, I think the difference between this month and last month is probably a small increase in cup quality (everything else, I expect would be more-or-less the same). You might perceive this as a slight intensification of flavours.

...continues on next page if you're on a PC/Mac... Edited by fatboyslim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, I thought since we'd chosen the same coffee, I'd need to give you something a little bit different, a little bit more, so for those of you who are interested, I'd like to give you a small insight into our view on 'omni-roasting' and how we approached the brief.

 

 

 

I think for that I need to delve into the concept of the omni-roast and what we think it is and what we think that other people think it is!

 

 

 

At its heart, omni-roast is understood to be coffee that has been roasted for both espresso and filter. This much is (mostly) true. The concept of an omni-roast has been sort of loosely referred to as a "single roast to rule them all" or a roasting strategy that uses a superior roasting technique to bring out the best in the coffee. That’s not what I think it means. Nor do I think a roaster is an omni-roaster if they don't label their coffees espresso roast or filter roast. The coffees aren't just automatically omni-roasted or suitable for everything (even if they say they are).

 

 

 

In our book, omni-roasting has far less to do with roasting and far more to do with sourcing than we're led to believe from the name 'omni-roast'. For us, whether a coffee is suitable for espresso or for filter or for both, is inherent in the bean’s flavour profile (chocolate, lemon etc) and its inherent characteristics (acidity, body, aftertaste, etc). That’s what makes it suitable for its purpose or not. Our approach to sourcing coffee, whether for espresso or filter is to look for specific characteristics, which I'll explain in a moment - likewise, when looking for an 'omni-roast', we're looking for something specific. I'd like to suggest that this has more to do with sourcing strategy than roasting strategy and therefore omni-roast would be more aptly named an 'omni-profile' coffee where it's flavour profile makes it suitable for more than one brewing method.

 

 

 

Before I go on, to be clear, it's quite easy to source a good filter coffee but our 'secret' approach to sourcing coffees that are suitable for espresso and (therefore omni) is essentially quite simple. They should have a rounded acidity. This is in contrast to acute acidity, which is an intense, sometimes short but usually quite a sharp acidity. As a given, we look for sweet coffees but for espresso, they must also have balance, which is first and foremost, the way acidity and sweetness hang together. High acidity can be pleasant when balanced with sweetness. Think lemon juice �� but now add sugar. There is a point at which the drink becomes balanced. Not too sour, not too sweet, not too strong, but pleasant. We often look for one more thing, flavour notes that fall into the cocoa, nutty and sugar-browning areas... but this is not essential.

 

 

 

Why do we source coffees with this flavour profile? Acute acidity and milk creates an unpleasant combination. Secondly, when you brew espresso, you amplify and concentrate the acidity. When the coffee beverage (espresso) is already intense and strong, the amplification of this attribute can become unpalatably sour to many and it is even worse when it is improperly brewed. A rounded acidity, balance and high sweetness provides the perfect backdrop for amplification. Considering the acidity isn't too low or the flavour profile boring, these attributes can make for a good filter coffee as well and therefore an omni-profile coffee. It is high-quality espresso that is the more finnicky to source for.

 

 

 

So, what we did was set out to source an ‘omni- profile coffee’. That is, a coffee that works as both an espresso and a filter. There are coffees that are just not as suitable to be brewed as espresso and there are some coffees that lack things we value when drunk as a filter (like acidity). Many roasters will break up their offering into filter roasts and espresso roasts and others will just sell coffee without a type of roast attached to it, but I'd like to posit that in many circumstances "espresso roast" is actually synonymous for "suitable for milk". If you want to brew for espresso, you will almost certainly need to add milk at some point.

 

 

 

To help grasp this idea, a lot of new roasters who perhaps have a limited grasp of sensory aspects of the coffee (sorry, anyone I offend!) might add 15 seconds to the development time to make it suitable for filter and espresso. This is also how many roasters approach filter roasts and espresso roasts; extra development of one, less development of another. The result of this is that usually one isn't that good. Either the espresso roast is too roasty or the filter coffee is underdeveloped. Sometimes both. It’s the addition of milk to coffee that has really confused most roasters and led to a growing surge in espresso and filter roasts. A strong desire to create something that ‘cuts through’ milk and a lack of good QC and cupping for flavour profile has exacerbated this problem. It's worth me adding that not all roasters simply add a bit of development at the end though for their espresso roasts and do modulate the roasting curve during different stages of the roast - for example, to increase body and dull the acidity or to attempt to get a higher solubility from the coffee by roasting it differently.

 

 

 

To draw this together, let me give a few examples from our current coffees and the thinking I might apply to consider whether they are suitable for use as an omni-profile coffee. Mormora is an incredibly sweet, rounded acidity coffee. It also has a nutty finish. It therefore hits our criteria for an omni-profile coffee. We would therefore roast it one way only for espresso and filter and we’d say that it ‘handles milk.’

 

 

 

Ethiopia Kayon Mountain, a washed coffee we sell has notes of bergamot, jasmine, apricot and peaches. It has an acute acidity and it therefore doesn’t hit our criteria for an omni-profile coffee. We could still brew it as an espresso and it will taste quite floral, but a lot of the nuance will be lost to the intensity of the acidity. In milk, it tastes slightly unpleasant due to the combination of acidity and milk. This would be a coffee marketed as a filter-roast by some roasters. We would say that it doesn't 'handle milk'.

 

 

 

Brazil Fazenda Sertao has notes of milk chocolate, walnut and quince. It has a rounded acidity, sweetness and balance and we could brew it as an espresso and a filter and it combines beautifully with milk but actually, there are many other coffees that have a much more dynamic flavour profile for filter coffee and so we’d sell it as a coffee that ‘handles milk’ but wouldn't be inclined to recommend it as a filter (even though you could drink it as filter). Other roasters would market it as an espresso roast.

 

 

 

Brazil Sitio Agua Limpa was a natural with notes of fig, cherry, nutmeg, dark chocolate and cashew. It has a rounded acidity, high sweetness and balance and we could brew it as an espresso and a filter and it combines beautifully with milk. This coffee was so interesting and complex and scored so highly, we put it on as a filter in our cafe and it’s proven to be one of the most popular choices. This was one that made it to the LSOL shortlist! Another roaster may have decided to market this as a filter coffee, maybe because they already had a Brazilian espresso or because they recognised that complexity like this doesn’t come out of Brazil all that often. It's worth celebrating that as a filter coffee but we think it’s an ‘omni-profile’ coffee. Good for filter, good for espresso, handles milk.

 

 

 

To conclude then, I'm dubious about the idea of an omni-roast coffee. It's not about the way the coffee is roasted that makes the coffee suitable for its purpose, but it's about the inherent or intrinsic qualities of that bean. It's therefore not so much a roasting strategy but a sourcing strategy that defines the omni-roast coffee. The bean is the heart of the coffee experience, not the roast - as much as I would love you to think that it was all us.

 

Epic write up! And so there we have it. It was from the same producer as the coffee we had last month! It wasn't intentional and I'll try to avoid it ever happening again but they were both tremendous coffees and different enough that I actually thought it was great. Try to catch some of you out :D

I'm sampling August's coffee atm and it's very different but equally delicious!

Edited by fatboyslim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Epic write up! And so there we have it. It was from the same producer as the coffee we had last month! It wasn't intentional and I'll try to avoid it ever happening again but they were both tremendous coffees and different enough that I actually thought it was great. Try to catch some of you out :D

I'm sampling August's coffee atm and it's very different but equally delicious!

That'll teach me not to go for my gut instincts! Have really enjoyed this Ethiopian natural side of life we've had the last quarter.

Great writeup & explanation into their method for differing roast profiles too.


Laissez les bons temps rouler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an incredible write-up, and think that 'omni-profile' rather than 'omni-roast' makes a lot more sense to me! Very happy I got to try these two back to back, has been a pleasure being able to compare the two, and am very fortunate to have a small stash of Long and Short to go back to after I finish the Cartwheel to complete the comparison!

 

Still loving this as espresso/mini-americano; the last couple of days have been the juiciest/most intense strawberry of the lot, but agree with @LukeT that distribution has been a little trickier with these guys than most things I'm used to.

 

After that write-up of there other coffees Cartwheel need to get to selling them online!!


Niche Zero || Feld2 || Aergrind

Profitec Pro 500 PID || Acaia Lunar

Kalita Wave || V60 || Aeropress || Clever Dripper || French Press

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't receive either coffee, but I would imagine it quite interesting to have the same coffee from different roasters (especially not knowing that was the case). I might pop into Cartwheel's cafe at lunchtime and see if I can pick up a bag of this since it seems to have gone down so well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fluffles has got a point. It is really intriguing to get the same bean 2 ways. Even more so because we didn't have any prior knowledge. Made even better having read the roasting philosophy from Cartwheel.

I have really appreciated this quarter's offerings and findings. A very successful LSOL quarter, thanks very much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The old LSOL double bluff - Ethiopia twice !

 

I would like to point out that Mroma Ethiopia is pretty close to the Kenya Border and is also is just 1600 miles from Rwanda - haha least I'm on the right continent


keep calm and grind flat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The old LSOL double bluff - Ethiopia twice !

 

I would like to point out that Mroma Ethiopia is pretty close to the Kenya Border and is also is just 1600 miles from Rwanda - haha least I'm on the right continent

 

This one certainly tasted less in-your-face Ethiopian, which is why I said maybe another African country. Smaller beans too, thought maybe it was a slightly different variety. Hey ho!


Nuova Simonelli Oscar II // Macap MXD //

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, not only do I agree that it's interesting to secretly have the same bean roasted differently, but also I'm super chuffed to have had Ethiopian naturals back to back, as they are probably my favourite! Thanks to the guys and to Cartwheel.

 

___

Eat, drink and be merry


Rocket R58Ceado E37SAeropressAerGrind • Puck Puck cold brew widget • VST 18g basket • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 convex black Ti/walnut tamper • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 flat sharp edge tamper • Big bag o' beans • Triumph Street Triple 675R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Epic write up! And so there we have it. It was from the same producer as the coffee we had last month! It wasn't intentional and I'll try to avoid it ever happening again but they were both tremendous coffees and different enough that I actually thought it was great. Try to catch some of you out :D

I'm sampling August's coffee atm and it's very different but equally delicious!

 

As a novice I found it useful, perhaps counter-intuitively, to drink each coffee over a period and using different methods before finding out what it was and reading the roaster's write-up. It's maybe nudged me to think about flavours a bit more. That write up I find very informative. Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that I have a set-up at work I'm managing to drink it before the reveal and I think that's the first time I've guessed right :cool:


Home: Sage Dual Boiler, Probat EK43 & Feldgind

Work: Sage Dual Boiler & Niche Zero

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve still got some of these from the freezer. Tried going slightly coarser and longer. 17.5g=> 48g 32 secs . Less intense but really fruity.


Sage DB; Mazzer Major; VST 15g, 18g & 20g Baskets;TORR Trapez & Perger Tamper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This coffee is divine. I have it in the freezer and consume during weekends.


Vesuvius stainless steel pipework / VST18 / Mahlkoenig Peak / Torr flat brass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer it to the Bailies one tbh, and have put it back in hopper.


Input: 'Terranovered’ Versalab M3 + Mahlkonig EK43 Turkish burrs + Niche

Output: KVdW Speedster + V60 + AeroPress + Syphon + Bialetti Induction Moka Pot + Bialetti Mucka Express + jar of instant for visitors..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I prefer it to the Bailies one tbh, and have put it back in hopper.

 

Probably the favourite LSOL I’ve had so far. Super duper tasty.


Nuova Simonelli Oscar II // Macap MXD //

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About:

    Coffee Forums UK is the UK's premier coffee forum Started in June 2008 by Glenn Watson, we now have more than 22000 mainly UK based members, and welcome more than 3000 members and visitors from around the world each day! With strategic investment and digital expertise from the Jackson Lockhart team (Tait Pollack and Adam Bateman), we are taking Coffee Forums UK to the next level, and are delighted to share the journey with you.

    New Members:

    We are often referred to as the friendliest forum on the web and we look forward to welcoming you onboard.

    Terms of Use

    Advertising

    Coffee Forums Media Kit

    Buy Advertising Space

    Donate

    Get Your Supporter Badge (per year)

×
×
  • Create New...