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This is just a question that I am curious about:

 

Today I tried a espresso at a 1:4 ratio (18g -> 72g, 45s) as suggested here and it tasted quite nice with the Ethiopian beans from BB.

 

When I knocked the puck out, it came out in one piece and the basket, VST 18g was nice and clean afterwards.

 

If I do the same with my usual 1:2 ratio in 34s, the puck is usually shattered and I have to rinse and clean the basket afterwards as there are some residual there.

 

Does anyone know why? It feels to me that the more water that goes through the coffee, the better-looking the spent puck will be.

 

Regardless of the aspect of the spent puck, the coffee in the cup is great. I am just wondering why.

 

I'm starting to feel the need to buy a refractometer...

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Did you grind any coarser for the 1:4 shot?

 

If the puck is at the same grind in both instances & shattered with a 1:2 shot, I don't see how it could repair itself for a 1:4 shot, nor how that 1:4 shot could avoid being channelled if the puck fractured at 36g out.

 

If the coffee tastes great it is because your grind & the brew ratio coincide to give a tasty extraction. Shorter shots can make it harder to hit a tasty extraction.


“Coffee evokes the most insane reactions in people”, Rene Redzepi.

 

https://markwjburness.wordpress.com/

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Did you grind any coarser for the 1:4 shot?

 

If the puck is at the same grind in both instances & shattered with a 1:2 shot, I don't see how it could repair itself for a 1:4 shot, nor how that 1:4 shot could avoid being channelled if the puck fractured at 36g out.

 

If the coffee tastes great it is because your grind & the brew ratio coincide to give a tasty extraction. Shorter shots can make it harder to hit a tasty extraction.

 

I did grind coarser for the 1:4.

 

However, I noticed that longer shots (same grind) tend to produce nicer looking spent pucks, even when using two different grinders.

 

I notice also that on shorter shots (in terms of time) the spent puck is wetter if compared to the same dose and grind but brewed longer.

 

Thanks for the response @MWJB, appreciate it.

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The finer ground puck offers more resistance so can be more prone to fracturing, may also retain a tad more water after the 3 way solenoid engages, or the longer contact time for a longer shot (same grind) may allow the puck to absorb more water. Either way, the wetness of the puck, assuming good cohesion, is probably not an issue.


“Coffee evokes the most insane reactions in people”, Rene Redzepi.

 

https://markwjburness.wordpress.com/

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