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Dalian Amazon Experiences


NAJB

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Drum neg. pressure might be interesting, but not necessary to get the hang of your roaster. If you have the opportunity to keep an eye on exhaust fumes (venting out of a window etc.), you can read pretty much from there. Steam in drying phase, smoke towards the end - amount, density and muzzle velocity.

I have mine connected to a venting duct, so I cannot see what exists the exhaust. Still, I manage to roast what I believe to be pretty palatable [emoji56][emoji23]

(btw, we might achieve 1000 batches this year - just sayin [emoji23] - can I get a forum badge for that?!)

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So after another roast, it seemed to be more difficult to follow the prescribed numbers in the manual. Seems to start off with a much higher roasting temp and not a big different between that and the air temp.

I have attached my log for anyone to take a look and pass any comments back. Cheers!!

IMG_9360.jpg

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What do the beans look like, and taste like!

Mine delivered on Friday, got a hand to take the box into my roasting lab (wooden cabin...) and have it now on a table with a one man self lift - just to impatient to wait for second pair of hands! actually not THAT heavy.

Will send install pictures, and I will be working on Artisan instrumentation next with Phidgets.

Rich

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Oh, stop using the supplied vent tube with the roaster and get a 100mm one, plus an adaptor to fit the fan outlet (or simply crush the 100mm one down to size at the end as I did).

CFUK, the biggest, best and most friendly forum in the UK...with a wealth of knowledge among its many members.

 

 

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What do the beans look like, and taste like!

Mine delivered on Friday, got a hand to take the box into my roasting lab (wooden cabin...) and have it now on a table with a one man self lift - just to impatient to wait for second pair of hands! actually not THAT heavy.

Will send install pictures, and I will be working on Artisan instrumentation next with Phidgets.

Rich

 

I did think it was heavy getting it onto the table. Look forward to see your set up.

 

Have not tasted the beans yet but they look ok. Again a little dark for me so will try for a lighter roast next time.

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Oh, stop using the supplied vent tube with the roaster and get a 100mm one, plus an adaptor to fit the fan outlet (or simply crush the 100mm one down to size at the end as I did).


Hi @DaveUK I will order a 100mm venting tube. Why is this better? Also, I was wondering if you have a view as to why my roasting temp and air temp are quite close?

My wattage and voltage numbers seems to match yours.
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Hi @DaveUK I will order a 100mm venting tube. Why is this better? Also, I was wondering if you have a view as to why my roasting temp and air temp are quite close?

 

My wattage and voltage numbers seems to match yours.

100mm means less restriction, careful with sharp bends (90deg) though as they make up for 6m of pipe

 

don't worry about AT at all, ikbthe end of the day these controllers aren't the most accurate ones and will display quite random numbers. Take them relatively and as guides and you'll be fine [emoji6]

 

 

PS: just the other day I had my neighbour over who runs a plant/measuring engineering company. I asked him to take a look at my temp probes (3mm dual PT100) to calibrate readings in Artisan. Seeing the difference now, the same probe reads around 25°C lower on internal controllers!!

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1 hour ago, Choffter said:

 


Hi @DaveUK I will order a 100mm venting tube. Why is this better? Also, I was wondering if you have a view as to why my roasting temp and air temp are quite close?

My wattage and voltage numbers seems to match yours.

Do the tube first, it may answer most of your questions.

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CFUK, the biggest, best and most friendly forum in the UK...with a wealth of knowledge among its many members.

 

 

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Here is my set up in progress, I am likely to use these guys for some professional vent exits in my set up https://www.jacob-uk.com/JACOB_Online_Catalogue_2017.pdf

On installation does anyone bother to seal the joints from roaster to cyclone?

I am putting cyclone on LHS of roaster,  and will exit out of wall behind and route up with a rain cap; and you may recognise the bench of Swedish origin.....

I am off on a trip to Vienna tomorrow [might follow some leads here https://europeancoffeetrip.com/coffee-day-in-vienna/ ] any good coffee spot recommendations welcomed ?

Does anyone know why the K-type probe for Artisan is positioned where it is? 

 

Rich

IMG_20190617_095056581_HDR.jpg

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Choffter, DaveC's guide will no doubt tell you more but I would suggest this is the minimum amount of space you want as you can put scales and container directly under the cooling tray exit hatch and have the net roast weight withouyt further faffing about, stand a phoner in a holder (I always use two timers - phone and wristwatch in case one fails for some reason), stand a drink, roast log etc.). Of course the space some people have around their roaster is even better. Reason for mine is when this was set up (and this pic is probalby 3 years old now) DaveC advised me to use a trolley so worst case in the event of a roast chamber fire I could reach to unplug and wheel it all outside. These days I use a different light DaveC suggested to judge final roast stage colour better.

 

Paul-L-Dahlian-Test-Roaster-Mar-2016.jpg

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K-type sits in this exact position because the hole was there. Simples! [emoji23] Dave might give you the long version, can't properly recall it...
I removed the probe and plugged the hole with a screw.

Re Vienna, drop in at https://www.tasteit.at/ located in the Inner City, Wollzeile. They can surely give you up to date directions where to get decent coffee... not too easy in good old Kaffeehaus town.

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The K type is there because that was the second best place for it, nowhere else was practical. It gives more an average of bean mass and environmental temp and doesn't vary as much as the PT100 probe.

CFUK, the biggest, best and most friendly forum in the UK...with a wealth of knowledge among its many members.

 

 

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Hi @chofter. Just a few extra thoughts;  as you get to know your roaster better as time goes on, keep changing your parameters and experiment to see what happens (but remember to log eveything).  From looking at your roast logs, your temp is continuing to increase quite rapidly after FC; which is not generally a good thing. You might want to reduce the temperature setting on the Ewelly controller (the one for Bean Temp) by 5 degrees so that the heating elements cut out sooner.

If you haven't read it yet - see if you can get a copy of a book by Scott Rao "The coffee roasters companion".  I  have found it to be a useful resource.

Finally, dont forget that fresh coffee needs time to de-gas (the chemical processes are still creating carbon dioxide) - leave it 5-10 days before drinking (experiment and see what seems best for you)

Enjoy the journey and remember to share your journey and ask lots of questions. You will find a ton of helpful advice and information here on the forum.

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Hi @chofter. Just a few extra thoughts;  as you get to know your roaster better as time goes on, keep changing your parameters and experiment to see what happens (but remember to log eveything).  From looking at your roast logs, your temp is continuing to increase quite rapidly after FC; which is not generally a good thing. You might want to reduce the temperature setting on the Ewelly controller (the one for Bean Temp) by 5 degrees so that the heating elements cut out sooner.

If you haven't read it yet - see if you can get a copy of a book by Scott Rao "The coffee roasters companion".  I  have found it to be a useful resource.

Finally, dont forget that fresh coffee needs time to de-gas (the chemical processes are still creating carbon dioxide) - leave it 5-10 days before drinking (experiment and see what seems best for you)

Enjoy the journey and remember to share your journey and ask lots of questions. You will find a ton of helpful advice and information here on the forum.

Much appreciated@RDC8 I’ll make the changes to the outlet vent as Dave suggested and also try reducing the bean temp too. I’ll do these independently of each other and try a roast with each / both. I’ll be sure to log and keep sharing my findings.

 

I have the book! Although very short it’s ideal for my level. Already learned a lot from it regarding the end to end process.

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For general interest here is my power monitor, a little more expensive than the Maplin device  no idea of it's accuracy by comparison. It is however a convenient set up. https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00JIMQP6Y/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

see images, I used the c-clamp sensor on one of the supply lines for the heater (plenty of room to do this neatly inside the rear panel)

I am also chasing the exact specification of the supplied RT100 Thermal sensors so I can source duplex sensors - can anyone help here?

R

IMG_20190621_100526923.jpg

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