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plasterboard fixings - WTF?

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If you use the metal machine screw type then drill a pilot hole but don't put the fixing all the way in. Leave enough proud to keep hold of with some needle nose players and tighten the bolt until you feel it bite. Then knock it all the way in and tighten...

Works for me!!!


L1, EK43, K30, Torr Titan, VST.

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I was more curious about whether it's hard enough to start screwing the whole fitting into the plasterboard, rather than tightening the screw inside the fitting.

 

Yes good tip for the anchors I've got, I might gives those a try, but will also probably buy the metal screw types tomorrow to play with.

 

Cheers,

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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The metal ones still use screws instead of machine screws, doesn't that bugger up anything? how hard is it to screw into the metal screw type ones then?

 

I always pre-drilled the wall to make sure the plastic goes where it should, still had a few times when they just wander away regardless.

 

T.

 

The metal screws that come supplied with the metal fixtures screw in very easily, it's not like screwing into wood...they are a PK type screw and almost feel like they are threaded.

 

As for the plastic wandering, I found the same, they just are not stiff and sharp enough...Also if you happen to get behind a wall with insufficient clearance behind e.g. near a dab or if the plasterboard is really close...then I always make sure the pilot hole is wide enough and goes in far enough to make sure whatever is behind doesn't "push back". Length is a big problem for me, hence the snapping off of the flatter self drill section.


ACS Vesuvius DBPP, Izzo Duetto DB, Minima DB, Lelit Bianca Prototype DB (paddle flow control) BTC Machines: Roasters: Amazon Dalian 1kg Drum Roaster, other failed roasters: Grinders: Ceado E92, Niche US and UK: 145kg assorted greens: My reviews at https://coffeeequipmentreviews.wordpress.com/

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FOR DRY LINED WALLS. SINGLE THICKNESS PLASTERBOARD

The aluminium screw in cones and the butterfly spring toggles are classed as suitable for LIGHT TO MEDIUM fixings eg wall mirrors

For medium weight fixings eg fixing kitchen base units to wall or for fixing light fittings. poly toggles

For medium to heavy fixing eg wall cupboards or radiators M4 X 40 interset fixings (four arm collapsible steel, can be collapsed with screwdriver or setting tool). Alternative fixing 8 mm nylon frame fixing (extra long plastic plug, 80 to 150 mm complete with long screw)

 

To prevent collapsing the plaster board, a short length of copper or rigid plastic pipe can be used as a spacer between the face of the plaster board and the substrate when fixing heavy items or if there is liklyhood of plaster board being depressed.

 

For all fixings it is essential to use the precisely correct drill bit otherwise the fixings will turn /spin.

If the substrate is too close the fixing can / will "jack" the plasterboard out (aluminium cone type and expanding collapsible anchors). This can be overcome by drilling / counterboring the substrate to accept the extra length.

Always use a sharp drill, blunt ones wander.

Referenced from British Gypsum Leaflet and practical experience.

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- anchor type with a machine screw, thought this would work best, but again the teeth just eats through the plasterboard and rotates.

 

Because you're not using the setting tool.


Londinium R | Ceado E37S | Torr Goldfinger

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So the setting tool holds the front of the anchor and stops it from rotating when the screw is tightened? Seems like I'm just daft, not the designers ;)

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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1m,38 shows a setting tool in use with Bodge it Brian - hopefully he has a brother called Fix it Félix First time!

 

 


keep calm and grind flat

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Fooooockin hell that makes perfect sense:) glad to have learned smth:)

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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Got the tool, made two new holes in the coat hanger back board, made two new holes in the plasterboard this time with a hole guide to make sure nothing slips, 5min later it was all fixed and not going anywhere. Damn if I knew this existed earlier...

 

Thanks for all the replies and advice, funny thing is everyone who asked about the tool at my work place (had it delivered to work and it sat visible on my desk) had no idea such a thing exists. I reckon there should be a national ad campaign telling people about this:)

 

Life is good again ;)

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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The plasterboard plugs I have used have 'teeth' that jam into the plasterboard to stop the whole plug rotating. After you have inserted the plug you have to give it a few taps with a hammer to seat it in place.

 

raw4160340.jpg

you can see the tooth here.

 

From memory I inserted the pugs then fully tightened the screw into it (hold the plug steady with a flat head screwdriver if necessary), then remove the screw and mount your item.

I've had great success with these but you need the special tool that pulls them to expand/lock them ...and you need to control the force used when expanding.

 

It looks a bit like a backwards rivet gun and costs about £12.

 

That said I have used them very successfully many times including comftably hanging our 46" TV on a cantalever wall bracket.

 

I had previously suffered as per other comments here.

 

These are the only fixings I use or recommend and have had 100% success (with the tool).

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I can't say I have ever had trouble with them and I have never used such a toolth,thays not to say they aren't prone to being a pita to install.

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Yes, fixings battle!

 

24662628592_ffd28e700c_o.jpg

 

What's the red / yellow one?

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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The screw pulls the yellow part forward against the taper, the yellow wings then spread out against the back of the plaster board.

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There's only one plasterboard fixing that I've found to be effective for heavy loads - GeeFix. I came across them recently after watching Charlie DIYte's review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeFyQS2NGVM

He provides a pretty good (objective) overview of how they work. I gave them a whirl when fixing some floating shelves in my daughter's bedroom. I now won't use anything else. 

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Q - are you the inventor ? - very odd for a first post on a coffee forum, but the product seems interesting and looks like a better solution 👍 however at £9 for 4 - unless your planning to swing on your shelf or tv bracket - and if you are then why not fix into the studs,

you might as well use a setting tool £12 https://www.toolstation.com/setting-tool/p96740?searchstr=setting tool

and 50  cavity bolts for£10 https://www.toolstation.com/fischer-hm-s-metal-cavity-fixing/p73656

£23 outlay to fit 50 (inc one off purchase of a setting tool) 49p a pop

or 

£48 outlay for 50 Geefix 98p a pop

From a more diy point of view then the Geefix is ok if you just have a couple of holes to sort, but if you live in a house with stud  (hollow) walls then I would go for a setting tool and cavity bolts as a better long term solution


keep calm and grind flat

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Yeah been there and got the t-shirt to for these things lol, found on block wall with dab and dot, then the below dryline pro, fixings are the best, stops things pushing in board over voids etc quite clever.  Even our house built in 1985 seems to have dab and dot mostly.

https://www.drylinepro.com/buy-online


Thanks

 

Lee. (R58 and Zenith 65e)

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I'd personally have a standard plastered wall over dab and dot every day. It's a quick method, but damn does it come with a lot of downsides. The best one is when you have the plaster wall really close to the brick wall and you drill in a spot where there's a mortar joint in the brick work, so your drill bit end wonders off and the side of the drill bit just chews through the plaster wall, leaving you with a huge wonky hole

T.

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Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

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We have dab and dot, but it's too close to the brick behind, this makes most conventional plasterboard fixing systems useless. I have to use  metal fixing with a point that's quite stubby, there are lots of variants but most are too long. Other than that with a longer fixing you have to drill out behind which unless your careful widens the hole and will only work for certain long twist in fixings. There are other types but something like these are short enough...if not I have to take the tip off and drill a small pilot. There is a different type even shorter, but I can't find the image.

image.png.0569de4af5e83ed39ef3f7b26a28aaea.png

I have wondered about these below as they seem like they would work well when the wall is close to the back of the plasterboard, but they are expensive.

 

IMG_20160922_114457950_HDR.jpg

 


ACS Vesuvius DBPP, Izzo Duetto DB, Minima DB, Lelit Bianca Prototype DB (paddle flow control) BTC Machines: Roasters: Amazon Dalian 1kg Drum Roaster, other failed roasters: Grinders: Ceado E92, Niche US and UK: 145kg assorted greens: My reviews at https://coffeeequipmentreviews.wordpress.com/

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