Jump to content
dsc

plasterboard fixings - WTF?

Recommended Posts

Argh!!!!! this is the only thing I can say about pretty much all available plasterboard fixings. Who the hell designs this crap? everything I've tried so far, starting with normal wall plugs, ending on stuff which is supposed to be the bees knees when it comes to plasterboard, just failed terribly. I have become a laughing stock for my wife who thinks I'm not able to fix a bloody coat hanger to a wall on which it was previously attached (but failed due to crap plasterboard fixings put in by the builders). Each fixing type I've tried so far is based on a rather simple idea of plonking a hole in the plasterboard, sticking the plug inside this hole and then tightening the fixing screw until the back end of the plug compresses enough to "grab" the plasterboard from both sides, thus giving you a fixing point. What the designers haven't realised yet is the fact that when you start tightening the screw, the whole damn plug just starts rotating in the plasterboard hole. Of course if it starts rotating, there's no way to tighten the screw to compress the back end, which means you are left with a loose fixing point, rather useless if you want to attach anything to it.

 

The only thing I've not tried so far is these Grab It fixings:

 

http://gripitfixings.co.uk/

 

Which look like might work as they remove the fundamental flaw which is friction based compression. Anyone tried these?

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have my complete sympathy - I had to install a bathroom cabinet on a stud wall using those ones you describe with the sprung wings that are supposed to splay out IF you can get the back nut to miraculously stay still. I also thought "who the hell thought of these" but somehow I managed it - can't remember how but I think it may have involved getting the nut as far in as I could and still have the arms fold enough to get through the hole. Then by pulling the fixing forward I think that created just enough friction to get the thing to start tightening.

 

I do remember this as being yet another episode involving naughty daddy words and me telling her that under no circumstances was she to find me any more DIY projects on pain of, er, something horrible.

 

Hope that helps (either the tip or the moral support! )


Rocket R58Ceado E37SAeropressAerGrind • Puck Puck cold brew widget • VST 18g basket • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 convex black Ti/walnut tamper • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 flat sharp edge tamper • Big bag o' beans • Triumph Street Triple 675R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO the best way to fix a coat hangar to a wall would be a combination of liquid nails - such as evogrip - http://www.bostik.co.uk/diy/product/evo-stik/Evo-Grip-Solvented/28

 

Or even better if you can get it use evostick gripfill - carpet layers use it to stick wooden gripper rods onto concrete floors - amazing stuff - http://www.bostik.co.uk/diy/product/evo-stik/Gripfill/141

 

 

 

Also use at the same time plasterboard fixings such as -

http://www.screwfix.com/p/dewalt-plasterboard-fixings-nylon-25mm

 

Ive used the evogrip to mount finger rails and dado rails without screws and there still up 15yrs later - -when you use plasterboard screws don't be tempted to overtighten them once flush as that's when they give way, hope this helps, cheers jim

 

 

Edited by jimbojohn55

keep calm and grind flat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plasterboard plugs I have used have 'teeth' that jam into the plasterboard to stop the whole plug rotating. After you have inserted the plug you have to give it a few taps with a hammer to seat it in place.

 

raw4160340.jpg

you can see the tooth here.

 

From memory I inserted the pugs then fully tightened the screw into it (hold the plug steady with a flat head screwdriver if necessary), then remove the screw and mount your item.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're fixing anything substantial to plasterboard, butterfly bolts offer greatest peace of mind.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried those ones Dylan, they just made the holes in the plasterboard bigger, which is how I ended up with the 'sprung wing' type which were also more trouble than they were worth! Like the look of some of these modern ones though - a bit better thought out.


Rocket R58Ceado E37SAeropressAerGrind • Puck Puck cold brew widget • VST 18g basket • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 convex black Ti/walnut tamper • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 flat sharp edge tamper • Big bag o' beans • Triumph Street Triple 675R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thinking about it, if you can find the vertical studs ( either poke around in the holes you have made or use small magnets to find the nails or screws holding the plasterboard to the studs) then just screw into the studs


keep calm and grind flat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of everything: machines, grinders, roaster, beans, tampers, baskets, blah, blah

However - Too much is never enough!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snap.


The Artist Formerly Known As 'jonc' | All the gear, almost no idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah - coincidence, but @jonc links to the self same product!


Lots of everything: machines, grinders, roaster, beans, tampers, baskets, blah, blah

However - Too much is never enough!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Double snap!


The Artist Formerly Known As 'jonc' | All the gear, almost no idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are what I'd use to put up a towel rail or some small thing. Don't think they'd cope with the cabinet I put up though - it weighed a ton (ok not a ton but it was made of thick MDF with 3 mirror doors so I didn't want to take chances). And even then, I've had those metal ones snap on the way in sometimes. I never use the plastic self-drill ones any more cos the driver tends to cam out in the soft plastic, but those metal ones are reasonable for light loads.


Rocket R58Ceado E37SAeropressAerGrind • Puck Puck cold brew widget • VST 18g basket • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 convex black Ti/walnut tamper • Torr Goldfinger 58.5 flat sharp edge tamper • Big bag o' beans • Triumph Street Triple 675R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the fixing is expected to carry a moderate weight then redidrives work well

 

If there is a greater load then by all means use intersets but use the setting tool first ;)

 

http://www.screwfix.com/p/rawlplug-interset-fixing-setting-tool/92462?cm_sp=Search-_-SearchRec-_-Area3&_requestid=274721#_=p

 

Those Gripits look interesting, uses the same principle as a lot of electrical plasterboard fixing boxes

Edited by grumpydaddy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's a modern house, why not fasten to the stout piece of timber lurking behind the board? The furthest you could be away from it is 300mm (12 inches). If the builders used 12.5mm board, then the studs will be at max 600mm centres - just knock on the wall until you hear a slight tone change and bingo, here's a rock-solod place to screw into.

 

If you are really lucky, they might be 9.5mm board, in which case the studs will be at 400mm centres and you would only be a max of 200mm away

 

NBN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$_12.JPG

These should do most fixing jobs. I've see stuff suspended from ceilings using these.

 

Otherwise try...

 

FORHF860.jpg

If the drywall is stuck onto block walls. Otherwise you have to find studwork behind the boards.


Input: 'Terranovered’ Versalab M3 + Mahlkonig EK43 Turkish burrs + Niche

Output: KVdW Speedster + V60 + AeroPress + Syphon + Bialetti Induction Moka Pot + Bialetti Mucka Express + jar of instant for visitors..

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's a significant weight the n I'd be looking to find the stud work and either fix it directly to that or fix a baton to 2 points of stud work then fix the cabinet to it.

 

How big is it? Any photos of it and the wall you need to fix it on?


Sage DB; Mazzer Major; VST 15g, 18g & 20g Baskets;TORR Trapez & Perger Tamper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
$_12.JPG

These should do most fixing jobs. I've see stuff suspended from ceilings using these.

 

Otherwise try...

If the drywall is stuck onto block walls. Otherwise you have to find studwork behind the boards.

 

The metal fixings are good, the best are the ones that go to a point and threaded almost all the way down, without those longer drill sections on them, and a sharper wider flared thread, but they are super hard to find. They also tend to be slightly shorter for a highish load rating (can't remember how much). They were used for fixing fairly heavy (full sized) fire extinguishers and other objects in a large corporate I used to work for.

 

The problem can be compounded if some of the plasterboard is fixed by dots and dabs, as in my place and you have limited clearance behind the board. Some I have used have flattened drilling tips and I snap those off to give a slightly shorter fixing and then drill the hole before inserting the fitting. This gives a much better result and less breakup of the board, so a stronger fitting.

 

In fact they looked a little like these but were heavier grade

 

http://www.theelectricalwarehouse.com/product.php/89786/scru-driva-metal-self-drill-plasterboard-fixings-12mm-pack-size-25


Crem One 2B DBPP (pre production version), ACS Vesuvius DBPP, Izzo Duetto DB, Minima DB, Lelit Bianca Prototype DBPP (paddle flow control), Lelit Mara X Prototype, BTC Machines: Roasters: Amazon Dalian 1kg Drum Roaster, other failed roasters: Grinders: Ceado E92, Niche US and UK, Eureka Atom Speciality 75, Eureka "Blow UP System", VDT Vibration thing: 145kg assorted greens: My reviews at https://coffeeequipmentreviews.wordpress.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a setting tool you're supposed to use with the plasterboard anchors, but those are only really appropriate for mega weight, and overkill for anything else (not that there's anything wrong with overkill)

 

e.g. http://www.screwfix.com/p/setting-tool/12429

 

I've used this to great success with some heavy cupboards.

 

Elsewhere in the house I've used the anchors with three wings that splay out for med/heavy fixings and some nylon fittings (with wings also, but can't find a direct link) for light/med fixings. For anything particularly light, I usually just insert a fairly standard wall plug half way in a hole that's not quite big enough (so it's snug before the screw goes in) and then use that - works well in a pinch.


Londinium R | Ceado E37S | Torr Goldfinger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and moral support! :) I tend to have a rule when it comes to diy stuff, use the right tools and it all works well. The issue with plasterboard seems to be finding the right tools!! Here's what I've tried so far:

 

- plastic version of the metal screw like plugs shown above

 

- plastic compression plasterboard Rawplugs which are suppose to pinch the plasterboard. Too bad you need so much force to compress the it just rotates in the hole

 

- anchor type with a machine screw, thought this would work best, but again the teeth just eats through the plasterboard and rotates.

 

- funky Rawplug back wing type which works well but its too deep and the whole bloody plug goes back / forth as its not pinching the plasterboard

 

Only to end up with holes the size of fingers and wripping plugs out of the wall with chunks of plasterboard simply because I was so pissed off with it (anger management req'd?). Funny thing is the most success I've had so far is with el cheapo ikea universal wall plugs, just ran out of the right sized ones. Second type which seemed to work was a plastic version of the metal screw like plugs shown above. Until of course I hit a dab behind the wall and the plastic plug screwed itself around 5mm to the left of where it should be. Now I have a light shelf in the bathroom with 3 fixing points instead of 4:)

 

The wall where the coat hanger should be (which is a piece of wood with hooks on it) is in a sad state, with around 6 holes, some plasterboard missing and loads of dab and shit behind the wall, great for drilling and wondering drills which make massive holes in the wall :( still can't find any wood planks behind the wall which I could use. Give me a standard concrete wall any day of the week!!!

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's dot'n'dabbed there won't be any stud work.

If you are fixing cabinets onto a block wall, set some wooden battens directly onto the block work using plugs and screws (cut out a bit of board) so it's hidden by the cabinets. Else just use long screws and plugs (the hammer fixings I posted a pic of) or plug n screw directly where there are drywall dabs.

 

I've done plenty of jobs where cabinets have been fastened using the metal board fixings (the threaded ones I've shown). I'm a plasterer by the way..


Input: 'Terranovered’ Versalab M3 + Mahlkonig EK43 Turkish burrs + Niche

Output: KVdW Speedster + V60 + AeroPress + Syphon + Bialetti Induction Moka Pot + Bialetti Mucka Express + jar of instant for visitors..

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all the replies and moral support! :) I tend to have a rule when it comes to diy stuff, use the right tools and it all works well. The issue with plasterboard seems to be finding the right tools!! Here's what I've tried so far:

 

- plastic version of the metal screw like plugs shown above

 

 

The wall where the coat hanger should be (which is a piece of wood with hooks on it) is in a sad state, with around 6 holes, some plasterboard missing and loads of dab and shit behind the wall, great for drilling and wondering drills which make massive holes in the wall :( still can't find any wood planks behind the wall which I could use. Give me a standard concrete wall any day of the week!!!

 

T.

 

The plastic ones are no good, they bugger up the board...if your wall is dabs and stuck on like mine, then you might need to break the tips off, or the self drill bit can be too long (get self drill metal ones with flat tips to do this). Also I know they say self drill, but you get a much better/cleaner job by drilling a correctly sized pilot hole...I think about 5 or 6mm.


Crem One 2B DBPP (pre production version), ACS Vesuvius DBPP, Izzo Duetto DB, Minima DB, Lelit Bianca Prototype DBPP (paddle flow control), Lelit Mara X Prototype, BTC Machines: Roasters: Amazon Dalian 1kg Drum Roaster, other failed roasters: Grinders: Ceado E92, Niche US and UK, Eureka Atom Speciality 75, Eureka "Blow UP System", VDT Vibration thing: 145kg assorted greens: My reviews at https://coffeeequipmentreviews.wordpress.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The metal ones still use screws instead of machine screws, doesn't that bugger up anything? how hard is it to screw into the metal screw type ones then?

 

I always pre-drilled the wall to make sure the plastic goes where it should, still had a few times when they just wander away regardless.

 

T.


Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder

Photography: Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not hard - you can do the entire job with a normal Philips screwdriver by hand


Lots of everything: machines, grinders, roaster, beans, tampers, baskets, blah, blah

However - Too much is never enough!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About:

    Coffee Forums UK is the UK's premier coffee forum Started in June 2008 by Glenn Watson, we now have more than 22000 mainly UK based members, and welcome more than 3000 members and visitors from around the world each day! With strategic investment and digital expertise from the Jackson Lockhart team (Tait Pollack and Adam Bateman), we are taking Coffee Forums UK to the next level, and are delighted to share the journey with you.

    New Members:

    We are often referred to as the friendliest forum on the web and we look forward to welcoming you onboard.

    Terms of Use

    Advertising

    Coffee Forums Media Kit

    Buy Advertising Space

    Donate

    Get Your Supporter Badge (per year)

×
×
  • Create New...