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Sourdough & Feeding The Starter

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22 hours ago, Jony said:

 

Marriage's Canadian strong flour and TSK Sourdough, if I haven't replied. I'm sure I will get it soon. Haha


SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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Just now, The Systemic Kid said:

Let's see the crumb🤞

Face palm moment. I don't even want to to do it, for my embarrassing bread. But it will only move me forward.

 

IMG_20190611_184842.jpg

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SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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Posted (edited)

I've had my fair share of these :) It's most likely underproofed and the large holes are due to shaping mistakes - probably a lot of flour used which left pockets of air. Fool's crumb is what Trevor J Wilson calls this I believe. Err on the side of too long a bulk ferment. If you have a glass bowl, use it. The dough should have lots of bubbles that you can see on the side of the bowl.

Edited by bronc

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I do agree from what you have said, was fridge for 15hrs so yes was a little busy. all thee above.

 

Thanks

 

Pizza soon haha


SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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We've all been there as Bronc says -chalk it up to experience.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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Posted (edited)

Will do, the first flat one was very tasty, second one not so but edible, but I don't actually mind getting things wrong. Should help me along the way.

 

Plus thanks for your help and recipes. To every one.

Edited by Jony

SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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@Jony Definitely underproofed. Not talking about time in the fridge, it doesn't do a whole lot there unless the fridge is too warm. You've not spent enough time in bulk, or at a too low temperature. It doesn't take many degrees difference before a dough needs hours more in bulk.

Many say "watch the dough, not the clock", which is absolutely right, but I believe many struggle with this because they don't know what the dough should feel or look like. Until you get experience with how it should feel, it's guesswork really. 

One method that helped me a lot was to look at increase in volume. That is s pretty reliable way that works universally. The exact increase is not aøl that important, but if you try to finish bulk when it has increased 30-50%, you are in the right territory. It can even go to 100% and make a respectable loaf, but I'd recommend aiming for 30-50%. 

Easier done with a transparent bowl, but also doable with one you can't see through by measuring the distance from the rim of the bowl to the dough after it has relaxed 30-60 minutes and spread itself out in the bowl. When you got that distance, you can transfer the dough to a new bowl and measure right away, or do the next measurement before next time you bake.

With the bowl empty, fill it with water to the same spot the dough reached and measure the volume or weight of the water. Then add 50% more water and measure the distance to the bowl again. That marks the point where you don't want the dough to rise above. Next time you let the dough sit (with strech and folds every 30 minutes the first 2 hours, then every hour) until it has reached that point. Then you flip it out and do the rest of the stuff.

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Thanks.


SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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I'm getting the urge to try this now. I quite like sour-dough bread since my gf buys it a lot from her local Polish supermarket (they bake it fresh there).

Going to have to go back through 63 pages now! :classic_rolleyes: maybe by Christmas time I'll have a go.. :whistle:


Input: 'Terranovered’ Versalab M3 + Mahlkonig EK43 Turkish burrs + Niche

Output: KVdW Speedster + V60 + AeroPress + Syphon + Bialetti Induction Moka Pot + Bialetti Mucka Express + jar of instant for visitors..

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200 white 160 wholemeal 40 dark rye +100g 50/50 starter well past ideal feeding (10hrs)

1hr autolyse 5hrs bulk with folds 12hrs fridge. Pretty good even crumb and nice flavour

 

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Well this seemed ok, this was already in the fridge, with my other bread I did. Can't believe two different with more or less same routine. Odd. Back on it next week. Doing pancakes tomorrow.

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SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

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@Jony what's the weight of your loaf prior to baking and what temp do you use and for how long? Hard to tell but middle looks more moist than edge of crumb. 


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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2 hours ago, The Systemic Kid said:

@Jony what's the weight of your loaf prior to baking and what temp do you use and for how long? Hard to tell but middle looks more moist than edge of crumb. 

Was your Sourdough recipe 300/100/100 I think it was  White Canadian Whole Rye and Spelt 20/25 mins both ways temp will drop slightly crappy oven I have temp gauge in oven.


SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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On 04/06/2019 at 09:51, Zephyp said:

I usually don't buy more than I spend in the next month or so. I did buy some pizza flour in a 25kg bag that I'll need a year to spend. Put as much as I could in the freezer and the rest as cold as I could find.

If you store flour for longer periods of time, you could freeze it, or freeze and then move somewhere else. I've read that if you freeze flour for 45 days, it can be moved to room temp since it killed off any potential beasts.

Thanks! 


little Rocket man ...

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I destroyed last night a lovely loaf because my dough got stuck on the linen... but truth to be told I have a terrible cloth and no matter how good I prep these or not is always the same story. Any  recommendations for some good linen for my bannetons? 

Paine.jpg

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On 22/06/2019 at 00:25, Adelina said:

I destroyed last night a lovely loaf because my dough got stuck on the linen... but truth to be told I have a terrible cloth and no matter how good I prep these or not is always the same story. Any  recommendations for some good linen for my bannetons? 

Paine.jpg

 

I'm probably outing myself as a barbarian, but here it goes: what do you guys do with your 'failed' bakes when learning or trying something new? Some of the 'failed' posted pictures in this thread do look gross, but is it safe to eat it? I had my fair share of less-than-stellar outcomes when playing around with pure rye sourdough in the last months. But given how hard good rye flour is to come by in Australia, and by pure desperation, I ended up still eating my misfits if the taste was at least acceptable. Is that a bad idea for  health reasons?

Also, maybe it is an overreaction after years of sponghy supermarket breads: I like to use the entire (rye) flour for my bread in the sourdough, instead of adding in larger portions of flour just before. I do like the very sour resulting taste for the moment, and maybe this helps with not adding any 'anxiety yeast' to force raising. Does anyone do this as well, or is my bread way too sour for regular tastes, like wife and kid?

(we will back in Europe for the next weeks, introducing the kid to on all kinds of my culinary memories :) )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Which loaves in here looks gross?

I've had many "failures",  mostly to do with fermentation and oven spring, resulting in a flat and dense or a loaf with large holes, but I think I've yet to make a bread that hasn't been eaten. There's nothing wrong with the flour or final product, it just didn't turn out as well as it should. It's still just water, flour, salt and yeast that's mixed, fermented and warmed up. Nothing unsafe about it. They have all tasted fine.

I've never added yeast to a sourdough bread. If it doesn't get a good oven spring, it's because I did something wrong, but it's still edible. Rye adds much more taste than most flours and there's nothing wrong with sourness if that's what you like.

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Which loaves in here looks gross?
I've had many "failures",  mostly to do with fermentation and oven spring, resulting in a flat and dense or a loaf with large holes, but I think I've yet to make a bread that hasn't been eaten. There's nothing wrong with the flour or final product, it just didn't turn out as well as it should. It's still just water, flour, salt and yeast that's mixed, fermented and warmed up. Nothing unsafe about it. They have all tasted fine.
I've never added yeast to a sourdough bread. If it doesn't get a good oven spring, it's because I did something wrong, but it's still edible. Rye adds much more taste than most flours and there's nothing wrong with sourness if that's what you like.
Sorry if 'gross' came over as overly negative. I meant to say that some of the photos in this thread had some aesthetic... differences... to what'd you get from a semi-industrial Baker in, say, Northern Germany. Many of my creations look odd in some way or the other. Good to see that I'm not heading for an upset stomach or something by eating sourdough bread where some areas look glibbery, moist or bubbly. Have never thought about eating uncooked sourdough - maybe it falls more into fermented food like kimchi or sauerkraut, rather than 'spoilt' as I had in mind? Need to look up eating raw sour dough next.

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Bought this book last week after seeing it out and about- what a fantastic buy! It’s such a great book for taking you through every step at an understandable level whilst going into more detail when you want to..5b08774694565fcde95f666b183dd482.jpg
First time trying a cold prove overnight, ~13 hours. 32cd816a068f418f1ed4c08aa4e031e2.jpg I think I need a bigger banneton!
07313be0d080d18ab1ba45ff7c438d54.jpgit says to use firebricks or a big cast iron pot, neither of which I have- so pizza stone instead.
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It was 75% hydration with 70% strong white and 30% wholegrain spelt. Haven’t cut into it yet but it’s my best looking loaf yet!


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Pre-millennium La Pavoni, Sage Duo Temp Pro, Niche Zero

Aergrind + Aeropress for travelling

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Posted (edited)

Looks far better than mine. Show us your crumb. Today's was a little rushed for time. Bit next week back on it.

IMG-20190706-WA0000.jpeg

IMG_20190706_113606.jpg

Edited by Jony
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SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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Looks far better than mine. Show us your crumb. Today's was a little rushed for time. Bit next week back on it.
IMG-20190706-WA0000.thumb.jpeg.042111df2cbede14fd5fd9e226f477f9.jpeg
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finally got round to cutting into it!
ecaaec631887800636f9bd01c775449f.jpg


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Pre-millennium La Pavoni, Sage Duo Temp Pro, Niche Zero

Aergrind + Aeropress for travelling

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Posted (edited)

Yummy, I have a issue eat about a 1/4 of it whilst warm haha

Edited by Jony

SAGE IS NOT A UPGRADE

 

 

:)

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