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Sourdough & Feeding The Starter

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Well it actually rose well overnight - astonished actually. Left out on the side, rather than in the fridge. Gave it a quick 45 min retarding in the fridge for good luck and it even turned out of the banneton properly! Maybe the process of building strength and tension is worth it!!

 

Forgot to take a photo. In the oven now, so let’s see.

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I got a bit distracted by the rugby yesterday so forgot to report back!

 

abc57362e5727c64c4af29dbb3a74473.jpg

 

705dd12e534fa933452b1c1bf45b4d69.jpg

 

Definitely one of my best loaves and this one even turned out of the banneton without sticking - first in about 6 bakes!

 

The bake with Jack recipe was really high hydration for a “beginner” recipe - 76%. Meant was very difficult to work with the slack dough so might use a bit less water next time.

 

Definitely helped working the dough and add structure though. I will need to work on that.

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Good open crumb - well done. If you like a slightly darker crust, you could increase bake time by another 10 mins.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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I’m really happy with this weekend’s loaf.

 

the test will be if I can replicate next weekend!

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How I learned to stop worrying and learn to love the dough.

 

This one got a bit away from me during bulk. I had to leave the apartment 6 hours into bulk and hoped to be back within an hour. Ended up taking a bit longer and the dough took off during that time. That bulk volume is what I want in the banneton and I didn't expect to get it back anytime soon. I worried it would overferment or become batter if I let it rise back up again in the banneton. It was also getting late.

 

14:00 Autolyse

15:00 Mix in salt and starter

15:00 Rubaud method

15:10 Rest

15:25 Rubaud method

15:30 Bulk with S&F every half hour the first two hours, then hourly

20:30 S&F7 and I left the apartment

22:40 Got back home, S&F8 and preshape

23:00 Shape and into banneton

23:30 Into fridge

 

The good news is that I actually got some rise in it this time. The 6-7 hours bulk is a far cry from the 2 hour bulks I've been doing. I've been too focused on the clock and it was difficult to gauge volume increase in a metal bowl. I'm aiming for 30-50% during bulk. This was obviously too much. I assume the need for more time is a result of low temperature. The dough was around 23C after mixing and took some hours getting up to the ambient 25C in the room. I've ordered a Brød & Taylor proofer so I can have better control over temperature and not having to spend half the day on the dough. I might also increase the water temperature in the dough mix a bit more. I suspect the Rubaud method evens out the temperature anyway. When I get the proofer I'll start leaving the bowl in the proofer before adding the dough, so it doesn't cool it down when I add it.

 

The ball i pinched off the dough and stuck in a small jar pretty much doubled in size, but the main dough looked like it had more than doubled. Not the easiest to measure of course because of the doming.

 

Bulk.jpg

20190224_224020.jpg

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100% Rye Sourdough yesterday. Pretty damn tasty and was very easy to make (if a little messy with the un-kneadable dough!)

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100% Rye Sourdough yesterday. Pretty damn tasty and was very easy to make (if a little messy with the un-kneadable dough!)

Sounds great. Recipe? I struggled making non sourdough loaves as they wouldn't rise as much as with strong flour

Gaggia Classic Chrome - Mignon Specialita 55

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Sounds great. Recipe? I struggled making non sourdough loaves as they wouldn't rise as much as with strong flour

 

From my favourite sourdough man Patrick Ryan;

 

He's making recipes for beginners so reasonably low hydration. I also seemed to get more rise than he did even though I followed his recipe exactly (apart from adding a bit more salt, and first proof being a bit longer as my kitchen was quite cold).

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Afternoon all!

 

Hope you have got a chance to bake this weekend

 

I managed to fit in a bake yesterday... wish I hadn’t bothered

 

Boule stick to baneton even with loads of flour. Came out in the end as a flat mess.

 

Loaf cake out ok but didn’t tear at score, blew a hole in the bottom instead eugh!

 

Looks like loaf wasn’t well shaped, as I can see shapes within crumb

 

0d4d6b9b138eb6f21b50c77d28b6e946.jpg

 

18f1c07f0413e67bd0eaf049afd94fbc.jpg

 

cd6f31e7b33d709476973092e90f473d.jpg

b7461fa305775f89f3e1c0c3fc0f4c08.jpg

 

It gets worse - managed to drop cloche on top worktop, taking a chip out that, breaking the cloche and scratching paint off kitchen panel

 

Eughhh

 

c6ed6f52371c120e508afa35c806b775.jpg


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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That's rough, Aron. Loaves looks good though!

 

I recommend using a liner in the banneton. Wool works, but linen is even better. This makes it a lot easier to get the dough out of the banneton before baking. If some parts stick to the liner, it doesn't tear the dough like it does when it sticks to the banneton since the liner just follows along. If it does stick a bit you'll minimize damage and can get it off easier since you kind of peel the doughs off the fabric.

 

The only downside is that you won't get the banneton pattern, or at least less of it, but I think it's absolutely worth it for the easier to handle doughs. I also like that you can use less or no flour. I know many decorate their loaves with flour, but I don't like eating unhydrated flour so I use as little flour as I can. Normally nothing, maybe a little if the dough is particularly sticky during shaping.

 

I also try to minimize flour during shaping, but it's less important since the flour got time in the fridge to pick up moisture. It's more important during shaping to have a dough that doesn't stick too much to the bench than one with little surface flour.

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I use rice flour to coat the bottom of my linen lined banneton and fine semolina for coating the shaped dough.

 

Top loaf pic, Aaron, whilst looking a tad flat, has good crumb aeration.

 

Second pic, you can see folding but this isn't a bad thing. Local pukka bakery near our son's shows much more when you cut into their loaves.

 

Bad news cloche-wise.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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I managed a loaf without breaking anything today (sorry to hear Aaron!)

 

Much better now. A few weeks on and two back to back have been brilliant. Need more time folding next time, but the rise overnight worked okay and fell out of the banneton well again.

 

Last night

b3398795f2a75b24bae833e632839258.jpg

 

This morning

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40e028acf5d8cdd0749d23db12d8649d.jpg

 

4ba4f2d08d24e8b45075562e9c83542b.jpg

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I expect this is quite well -known, but I was surprised to read about how the scores are used to influence shape.

 

http:// http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10121/bread-scoring-tutorial-updated-122009

 

I would always score along the length of the dough holding the knife vertically. From reading this though, I wonder if the longitudinal flap (??!) method might encourage more height and less spread?

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Any preference for a curved, vs straight bread lame to score with?

 

If I now need to keep a razor blade in the kitchen I need to have one with a guard.

 

Any recommendations pls?

 

I like this one, https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F173743135445 but may have just get distracted that is a bit prettier!

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Using a lame takes a bit of practice to get right. Biggest mistake is making the cut too slowly - faster the better for a clean cut that avoids pulling the dough. A lame that curves the razor blade makes a more open cut like this one

 

Bakery Bits sell them as I recall.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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Still no lame sorted, but dough sorted for tomorrow. Don’t yet dare leave to rise in the fridge but our kitchen is 16 degrees overnight so cool enough still.

 

Fingers crossed.

486544990a144ac01f8c95f98a43ee59.jpg

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So smaller load at the moment - total weight about 900g

 

Rising quite well out on the side, wouldn’t have wanted much less rise?

 

633e94bab226bfa95830749d39725b81.jpg

 

I placed in fridge for an hr this morning whilst oven heating. Not sure that helped or not though. Guess couldn’t hurt.

 

Loaf leaving banneton seamlessly now, so that problem solved.

 

Unfortunately spreads when hits the baking stone as usual, maybe will photograph when waiting to go into the oven next time for a comparison?

 

Tried to score at an angle with a “confident stroke”, to which the loaf dragged and almost skidded off the baking stone - bugger!! More practice needed. However, you can see there is the definite making of a “flap” in the finished loaf, so hopefully improve technique and buy a lame.

 

Overall pleased. Could have had a few mins less to bake tho

3ad7fe83e7a8b89a43dec368d7cb2d75.jpg

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3f2b62f83201647e9d099d1023a622ab.jpg

This. Is. The. One.

 

I hope. I’m feeling good for this one. Have built a lot of structure and the starter was active before feeding. This should work! ....I hope :)

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3f2b62f83201647e9d099d1023a622ab.jpg

This. Is. The. One.

 

I hope. I’m feeling good for this one. Have built a lot of structure and the starter was active before feeding. This should work! ....I hope :)

 

Fingers crossed


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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Posted (edited)

Nope. That was not the one. Sadly no amount of positive thought could compensate for what I think was probably overproofing.

 

bc25ea26d407f576a39fcd1739587a26.jpg

 

That said. I learned more about the baking techniques, so not a completely lost cause!

 

 

I have always been nervous of leaving the dough in the fridge overnight. (Assuming I get the levain and structure building correct), if I put the dough In banneton in the fridge at 11.00 pm, what time should I be able to cook the next day?

Edited by rob177palmer

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Refrigerating dough overnight will slow the rise. Problem is, you won't know by how much until you check the following morning. I've had plenty of experiences where it hasn't risen hardly at all to instances where is has over-proved so I don't refrigerate any more - it's too variable.

 

If the dough has risen sufficiently you can bake straight from the fridge - especially if you are using a Dutch oven preheated to 230-240c. That will induce plenty of oven spring. Baking at the correct level of rise is the key. If anything, erring on the side of underproving (very slightly) is better than overproving IMO.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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It's impossible to say how long it could stay in the fridge since it depends on many factors. I usually let it sit 12-24 hours and don't see any acivity at all.

 

My trouble these days is I want to proof longer and bake when it has proven more, but that makes the dough too relaxed and it pancakes when I pour it onto the pan. Trying for 30-50% rise during bulk, which it does fine, but then it needs so many hours in final proof that it lose tension. Maybe I'm trying for loaves which needs stronger flour.

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