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Sourdough & Feeding The Starter

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I'd like to order a 16kg sack of Shipton Mill's flour to try it but can't decide between Untreated Organic White Flour No.4 (105), Canadian Strong White Bread Flour (112) and Finest Bakers White Bread Flour No.1 (101). Which one would you guys recommend amongst the three?

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Depends on what level of hydration you're planning to use. Higher hydration - using flour with high protein - makes dough more manageable. Some Canadian flours hit 15% protein content. Been using a mix of: Khorasan flour - 15% protein content -at a ratio of 250grms to 600grms of very strong white plus 150grms rye at 80% hydration. Using percentage of flour with 15% protein content is the only way I can bake off one kilo loaves in a Dutch oven without the loaf spreading too much.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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Right. I need to get back into Sourdough.

 

I have ordered a load of flour from Shipton Mill on the merits of Gary's loaves.

 

Have also got a Brod and Taylor proofing box to try and get some consistent temperatures, hard in my old drafty house.

 

Does anyone else use one?


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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I do. I couldn't live without one as I the temperature at my place is around 20*C during the winter.

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Same here Bronc! It’s freezing here at the moment

 

Who can recommend a fool proof sourdough recipe. I tried Vanessa Kimbells basic sourdough recipe which is stretch and fold but no kneading, but never had fantastic results


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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Which flour did you get? I'm ordering a 16kg sack of the Untreated Organic No 4 to play around with.

 

As for the recipe, to be honest there is no one recipe that can suit all. You might want to follow the same formula (in terms of flours, water, salt, and starter %) for a while until you get used to the dough but when it comes to times, stretch & folds, kneading, etc. you need to be observant of the fermentation process and the dough and not follow a fixed time schedule.

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I have done for a mix of lots to be honest

Canadian strong - 112

Traditional organic white - 704

Finest bakers white - 101

Biodynamic stoneground


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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Starter is having a lovely time in the Proving box. Has doubled in size since 8am this morning.


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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Starter is having a lovely time in the Proving box. Has doubled in size since 8am this morning.
That a boy!

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Kitchen is currently 15c, so would have never risen much without the proving box. Getting ready for a loaf this weekend :)


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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Please can I also ask for some expert advice?!

 

I have been following this thread on and off for a year or so, and have now been inspired to get back to making sourdough.

 

75243d13b0d624cf810c9fe841d1411c.jpg

 

b65b4ce8da1b5b469f151f328dcdc074.jpg

 

I have a well established-starter (called Eric!). Here is today’s effort. Tasted good but the texture could be improved, I just don’t know where to start!

 

Starter fed and left overnight. Had lots of bubbles on the surface when I started the knead this morning.

2hr proof,

knock back,

6 hr proof (last 2 hrs on top of a hot then cooling espresso machine!!)

Cook on a hot pizza stone @ 240C for 30mins

 

I am lost as to whether my first or second proof was insufficient.

 

Hints would be gratefully received!

 

Thanks all.

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Wouldn't advise changing the location where you leave the dough to rise, i.e. cooling espresso machine - you will have overstimulated the dough, i.e. overprooved it. Try and keep the proving temp constant and not too warm.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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So the second proof to be longer and slower? What do you look for as to when it’s ready to bake? I went for time elapsed but frankly was a guess.

 

Also re-Reading this thread at the start, I don’t think my starter doubled in size overnight. Maybe not getting that active enough at the beginning

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Just fed another starter and have measured starting volume. Will wait to knead into mixture until starter has doubled. See what difference that makes.

 

TBH had previously worried that leaving overnight was too long and starter past it, but now suspecting not long enough.

 

Will report back tomorrow...

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Please can I also ask for some expert advice?!

 

I have been following this thread on and off for a year or so, and have now been inspired to get back to making sourdough.

 

75243d13b0d624cf810c9fe841d1411c.jpg

 

b65b4ce8da1b5b469f151f328dcdc074.jpg

 

I have a well established-starter (called Eric!). Here is today’s effort. Tasted good but the texture could be improved, I just don’t know where to start!

 

Starter fed and left overnight. Had lots of bubbles on the surface when I started the knead this morning.

2hr proof,

knock back,

6 hr proof (last 2 hrs on top of a hot then cooling espresso machine!!)

Cook on a hot pizza stone @ 240C for 30mins

 

I am lost as to whether my first or second proof was insufficient.

 

Hints would be gratefully received!

 

Thanks all.

2 hr initial prove sounds way too short unless at high ambient temperature

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What were the bubbles like at the top of the starter? Lots of big bubbles tends to be be, where as if it is foamy, that tends to mean it has gone past peak activity


Profitec 700 | Compak E8

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It's a good idea to take a portion of your stock starter and feed it ahead of mixing it in with the flour. If you are going to use, say, 300grms of starter, I would take 100grms of stock starter and feed it with 100grms of flour and add 100grms of water. I do this the night before I want to start baking. The next morning, the prepared starter has doubled its bulk and is ready to go.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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2 hr initial prove sounds way too short unless at high ambient temperature

 

Agree - unless you're using a pukka proving box. Sourdough rises much more slowly - even slower at cooler winter temps.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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That bread is definitely underproofed. Bulk at 25-26*C with 20% starter bakers weight takes at least 3.5-4h and that's if your starter is very vigorous. Also don't knock back the sourdough as you would yeasted breads as if you do, you would need to leave it to bulk ferment again until it accumulates more gas so it can hold it's shape while proofing. Sourdough is much slower than commercial yeast.

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Right, this is looking better today. I took 150g from Eric, fed with 75/75 water to flour and left overnight. Placed on top of warming espresso machine this has really grown - much more than unusual.

 

Didn’t mark the starting height (sorry!) but was below the level of tree purple handle on our butter dish! Now well above, as you can see:

3e5d79a05b957ba9d5da0c29fe4f3ced.jpg

 

Here from the top:

32802211ca519c31c8b01ad69e350e64.jpg

 

So a much more vigorous starter than normal.

 

Noted on not knocking back. Will knead next, then rise in a 40degree oven IN THE PROOFING BASKET.

 

Fingers crossed!

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40 degree oven is way too high. Aim in the 25-30*C range. That can be achieved in an oven with the light on and the door slightly cracked.

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Not the most open crumb but that's because it is 50% stoneground wholemeal. Very moist and soft interior. 86% hydration - about 4 hours bulk at 24C then overnight in the fridge.8efa73e645da62881330b1d1598cd2fc.jpg

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Here’s my second attempt, as promised:

 

d8e56ad8d3f0b2336f017d31aae4cd66.jpg

 

Significantly better- I think that was down to the starter being properly active this time.

 

Kept the bread in a fan over an 40 degrees, but actually noticed a better rise when transferred to on top of coffee machine (had guests over and needed to speed up process!)

 

A new screw-up tho - i covered the proofing basket with cling film throughout - unfortunately this meant the dough kept too moist and didn’t turn out of the basket onto the baking stone! Has to almost scrape it out!

 

So, is cling film not recommended for proving? This was a first for me but lots of recipes recommend.

 

What do you recommend covering with to proof?

 

Considering the cling film incident, the bread was excellent :)

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