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Mike mc

Home made pizza thread

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As requested I'm making a thread to show my progress with a pizza oven I purchased(the g3 ferrari).

 

Here's a picture of my first attempt.i was very suprised with the results and far exceeded my expectations.

 

A friend of a friend has had the same oven for a while and spoke very highly of it.i was sceptical as 120 is a lot of money if the product was a gimmick

 

For the dough I used Jamie Oliver's pizza dough recipe but used Italian 00 flour instead of the strong white flour

 

I also cheated and used a tin of pizza express passata(until I find a decent recipe to make my own sauce)

 

Feel free to add your own pizza making accomplishments

 

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1373489191.589524.jpg

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Pictures of the base next time would be good. Would be nice to see the charing and blistering you get.

 

Have you seen this guys site?! It's a mess but well worth working through.

 

http://varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

 

I've been working at my pizza for a year and a half but I've pretty much given up on getting a true pizza until I get an outdoor oven. So interested to see how you get on.

 

For sauce I use the best Italian tinned tomatoes I can buy with a table spoon or so of dried oregano, touch of brown sugar and salt to taste. That's it, no need to cook it will cook on the pizza.


Expobar Brewtus IV | Mazzer Super Jolly

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Pictures of the base next time would be good. Would be nice to see the charing and blistering you get.

 

Have you seen this guys site?! It's a mess but well worth working through.

 

http://varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

 

I've been working at my pizza for a year and a half but I've pretty much given up on getting a true pizza until I get an outdoor oven. So interested to see how you get on.

 

For sauce I use the best Italian tinned tomatoes I can buy with a table spoon or so of dried oregano, touch of brown sugar and salt to taste. That's it, no need to cook it will cook on the pizza.

 

Thanks ill take a look at that site.i will be making another pizza on Friday as my son has requested one for dinner.will take some pics of the base for you.the last one was crisp on the outside but a more softer chewy texture on the inside(it was not raw thou,same as you'd get from a pizza takeaway)

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I make my own pizzas quite often. Base from Richard Bertinet's book works well when cooked on a pizza stone.

 

For the sauce I use chopped tomatoes and a bit of oregano simmered down on a low heat.

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Here's a couple of recent pics, but as you can see from the lack of beautiful black bits, I don't have a pizza oven, just a stone. Base is made in a food processor with strong bread flour.

 

IMG_1779.jpg

 

IMG_1728.jpg

I really fancy a baking steel, but am less keen for the delivery charge from the US and probable import duty

 

And for a totally different style of pizza, these have a foccacia-like base and are incredible, but very filling

DSC_0006.jpg


Londinium L1 | Compak E8

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+1 for pizza stone. Absolutely crucial to let it heat up. Whack the oven on full while you're making the base. My favourite topping at the moment is chicken, chorizo and asparagus. Hungry now!


Rocket Giotto. Gaggia Classic. Eureka Mignon. Madebyknock Heft tamper. Fine layer of coffee grinds scattered throughout the kitchen.

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I like thin pizzas, made these a while back. Been on a diet, so not had any for a while though.

 

They look pretty damn good. On two diets at the moment - don't get enough food on one.:act-up:


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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And for a totally different style of pizza, these have a foccacia-like base and are incredible, but very filling

[ATTACH=CONFIG]2983[/ATTACH]

 

The foccacia ones look amazing - how do you make them?

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The foccacia ones look amazing - how do you make them?

 

It's incredibly easy - it's even a no-knead dough. Recipe came from Serious Eats, where I also got my thin crust recipe.


Londinium L1 | Compak E8

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Any one recommend a decent pizza stone or are they all the same

 

Thanks

 

Robert


Gaggia Classic, Brasilia RR55OD

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Any one recommend a decent pizza stone or are they all the same, Robert

 

I use this with good results.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Andrew-James-Chrome-Includes-Cutter/dp/B005DR1CLQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373577479&sr=8-1&keywords=pampered+chef+pizza+stone


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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Any one recommend a decent pizza stone or are they all the same

 

Thanks

 

Robert

 

The best value pizza stone is a granite chopping board from tesco. They're about £11. Turn them upside down and use the unpolished side. Just remember to scrape the foam feet off before using. They're much thicker than most pizza stones in the shops and it pretty much fills a standard oven shelf.


Gaggia classic (OPV, steam wand and auber PID), HG one, hausgrind walnut, rattleware handle free, bottomless pf, 15g, 18g and 20g vst, torr goldfinger, 3 cup chemex, 8 cup chemex, 3 cup siphon, ceramic v60-01, kalita wave 155 and an aeropress.

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a lot of reviewers of the ceramic pizza stones suggest they are prone to shattering. Will this happen to the granite one?

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a lot of reviewers of the ceramic pizza stones suggest they are prone to shattering. Will this happen to the granite one?

 

I don't think they can explode or anything but they can crack. Mine's split in 2 but at that price I can't really complain, I've seen ones online for about 4 times the price. It's still useable.


Gaggia classic (OPV, steam wand and auber PID), HG one, hausgrind walnut, rattleware handle free, bottomless pf, 15g, 18g and 20g vst, torr goldfinger, 3 cup chemex, 8 cup chemex, 3 cup siphon, ceramic v60-01, kalita wave 155 and an aeropress.

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Yeh, granite or marble slabs 1-3cm thick are ideal. Apparently it's best to heat them slowly the first couple of uses (unless it's a proper pizza stone) in case of any moisture that could cause it to crack.

EDIT - avoid glazed or polished surfaces too.


Rocket Giotto. Gaggia Classic. Eureka Mignon. Madebyknock Heft tamper. Fine layer of coffee grinds scattered throughout the kitchen.

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Oh, and they're great for baking bread on too.


Gaggia classic (OPV, steam wand and auber PID), HG one, hausgrind walnut, rattleware handle free, bottomless pf, 15g, 18g and 20g vst, torr goldfinger, 3 cup chemex, 8 cup chemex, 3 cup siphon, ceramic v60-01, kalita wave 155 and an aeropress.

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a lot of reviewers of the ceramic pizza stones suggest they are prone to shattering. Will this happen to the granite one?

 

Ceramic stones are fine as long as you don't let any water near them - so don't wash them. Just wipe with a paper towel after use. They get blackened with use but this is fine. Granite stones need care too - again, no contact with water and let them cool naturally after use. Granite stones retain the heat for ages. I managed to crack one but that was due to my chucking water into the oven to help develop the crust during bread baking. More careful now!


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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Yeh, granite or marble slabs 1-3cm thick are ideal. Apparently it's best to heat them slowly the first couple of uses (unless it's a proper pizza stone) in case of any moisture that could cause it to crack. EDIT - avoid glazed or polished surfaces too.

 

Not sure about your point of avoiding polished surfaces. I have a bread baking stone from Bakery Bits and it's highly polished which makes sliding dough on to it much easier. You're right about the need to cure a baking stone though to drive off any trapped moisture.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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I use a clay stone or terracotta or whatever it's made from, it's massive so gets used lengthways in my over but works well, and I have used it for break too. I'd like a smaller one too. I might try the one listed above at a tenner.

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Not sure about your point of avoiding polished surfaces. I have a bread baking stone from Bakery Bits and it's highly polished which makes sliding dough on to it much easier. You're right about the need to cure a baking stone though to drive off any trapped moisture.

 

I don't know how true it is but I've heard it said that the polishing process uses chemicals that you might not want in contact with your food. I think mine cracked due to spraying water on it when baking bread.


Gaggia classic (OPV, steam wand and auber PID), HG one, hausgrind walnut, rattleware handle free, bottomless pf, 15g, 18g and 20g vst, torr goldfinger, 3 cup chemex, 8 cup chemex, 3 cup siphon, ceramic v60-01, kalita wave 155 and an aeropress.

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To be honest I can't remember what the problem was with using polished surfaces. I know that glazed is a big no no because of lead being used in the glaze.


Rocket Giotto. Gaggia Classic. Eureka Mignon. Madebyknock Heft tamper. Fine layer of coffee grinds scattered throughout the kitchen.

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I don't know how true it is but I've heard it said that the polishing process uses chemicals that you might not want in contact with your food. I think mine cracked due to spraying water on it when baking bread.

 

Important point, Neil. That's why I got a proprietary granite baking stone from a bakery suppliers so I know it's designed for the job and won't have been treated with any unpleasant and/or possibly harmful chemicals. Anyone thinking of getting a granite stone would be advised to check with the supplier to see if it is suitable for food use.


Londinium-R - EKS43 running SSP Silver Knight burrs

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This was last night's pizza. Reduced the water by a few percent and it resulted in the best base I've made so far - chewy, with some crispiness but not too much. Went down to 4 chillies from the 7 I had last week which was about right.

 

IMG_1788.jpg


Londinium L1 | Compak E8

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