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Thread: V60 - water / slurry level

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MWJB View Post
    I pour in 20s intervals always. With a medium drip grind & 6 pulses of ~35g (~10-15% passing through a Kruve 400) I don't see the bed drain out.
    As I was thinking the other day, hmmm I should use the Kruve for something. Do you just use it with a lower amount - and you keep it all but just use that about 10 - 15% as a benchmark for the right grind setting? (Sorry I know not directly related to this thread exactly, though I think tom had a Kruve as well, so might be of interest).
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlarkin View Post
    As I was thinking the other day, hmmm I should use the Kruve for something. Do you just use it with a lower amount - and you keep it all but just use that about 10 - 15% as a benchmark for the right grind setting? (Sorry I know not directly related to this thread exactly, though I think tom had a Kruve as well, so might be of interest).
    I do 10g test grinds, but it seems to be consistent with up to 20g. Yeah 12-13% +/-2% would be my start point for my recipe, you may not get exactly the same % each time so +/-2% seems reasonable.

    I use 2 sieves, it's just that anyone who has one will have the 400 and I have used that the most. (Currently I'm using 700-1600, but I don't suppose many folk have the larger sizes).

    I don't discard any portion of any grind in my day to day drip brews. You could experiment with discarding the largest 20% for drip, or <400, or 500 for immersions.
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  3. #13
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    I've done some more testing and it seems that the method of pouring seems to have little impact on TDS/EY levels. Mixing the slurry post blooming phase seems to kick the TDS up by 0.05%, biggest difference comes from single dosing vs. Bean by bean dosing as the latter is much coarser and thus requires a rather significant grind setting change.

    T.
    Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder
    Photography: Flickr

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    Method of pouring is a bit of a vague term. If you mean pouring all the water in a relatively consistent rate (whether spiralling/not spiralling/in a steady trickle/pulses) then I agree with you. If you man you can bloom and add all your water in 10s, compared to bloom and add all your water in say, in 2 minutes, then the difference will be as big as you can get.

    Coarse grinds don't seem to need mixing/stirring/swirling with the water. It seems to permeate the bed OK just with the pour.

    0.05%TDS isn't any difference over say 100 brews, it's not even much difference for a few brews with the same coffee.

    It's "coarser", but needs a grind setting change? A change to what? Back to roughly where it was? How are you measuring the coarseness? What is your definition of coarseness (size at 0-16%, average size, size at largest 10% - if there is a difference in particle distribution, however unlikely this is, it doesn't seem practical to go by average size, it seems more logical to me to find a size that targets similar EY, then measure it.

    I have logged over 1000 drip brews (different brewers & recipes)...there's plenty I don't know of course, but as far as impact on extraction goes, assuming similar brew temp/ratio/brew size, the biggest impact is the rate at which you pour the water, pour faster for fine until EY drops/becomes inconsistent (bigger than +/-0.5%EY for a single coffee, bigger than 3% span for a range to 1 stddev), pour slower for coarse until EYs drop out of tasty (might be below 18%EY and they still taste good).

    But here's the most important thing to bear in mind - if your recipe is consistent (it should be) you can still make brews taste bad by flushing silt through the paper. This has a big impact on taste for consistent EY/water/coffee brews.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MWJB View Post
    Method of pouring is a bit of a vague term. If you mean pouring all the water in a relatively consistent rate (whether spiralling/not spiralling/in a steady trickle/pulses) then I agree with you. If you man you can bloom and add all your water in 10s, compared to bloom and add all your water in say, in 2 minutes, then the difference will be as big as you can get.

    Coarse grinds don't seem to need mixing/stirring/swirling with the water. It seems to permeate the bed OK just with the pour.

    0.05%TDS isn't any difference over say 100 brews, it's not even much difference for a few brews with the same coffee.

    It's "coarser", but needs a grind setting change? A change to what? Back to roughly where it was? How are you measuring the coarseness? What is your definition of coarseness (size at 0-16%, average size, size at largest 10% - if there is a difference in particle distribution, however unlikely this is, it doesn't seem practical to go by average size, it seems more logical to me to find a size that targets similar EY, then measure it.

    I have logged over 1000 drip brews (different brewers & recipes)...there's plenty I don't know of course, but as far as impact on extraction goes, assuming similar brew temp/ratio/brew size, the biggest impact is the rate at which you pour the water, pour faster for fine until EY drops/becomes inconsistent (bigger than +/-0.5%EY for a single coffee, bigger than 3% span for a range to 1 stddev), pour slower for coarse until EYs drop out of tasty (might be below 18%EY and they still taste good).

    But here's the most important thing to bear in mind - if your recipe is consistent (it should be) you can still make brews taste bad by flushing silt through the paper. This has a big impact on taste for consistent EY/water/coffee brews.
    Method of pouring - I meant bloom + use all water in one go vs bloom and do several short pours with 20-30s breaks inbetween. I'm assuming here that brews are standard as in you don't do crazy shit like pouring half a litre in 5sec. Ratio is fixed, 18g coffee / 300g water off boil.

    Coarseness - as in burr gap. For example I've done a brew this morning, at 2.00mm burr gap which was 1.15% TDS (not sure what EY that calcs to), just did another one at 1.85mm and got 1.25% TDS which is way too low imho for such a burr gap change. (note: sometimes if I have time I grind bean by bean which requires a finer grind setting / smaller burr gap).

    Rate of pouring - I seem to be arriving at the same conclusion. The tastiest brews I've had are when I was pouring really slowly till around the 2nd min. The last brew I did was fairly fast with quite a lot of turbulence in the filter due to a higher pouring position and it's crap taste wise.

    Silt - this is what I think happens often, what's the reason for this then?

    T.
    Espresso: Londinium L1, ZR-71 grinder
    Photography: Flickr

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsc View Post
    Silt - this is what I think happens often, what's the reason for this then?

    T.
    Too much turbulence for the grind size used, letting the bed drain out with a too fine grind. Also, the more water you put through the dose seems to make it worse, but I don't know whether this is the case in terms of actual silt in the cup, or whether brewing slightly stronger (say 64g/L) just masks it.

    You can bloom then pour all remaining water in a few sec with Melitta, Bonavita Immersion brewer used as a drip brewer & Kalita Wave & still get tasty, consistent brews, but they are more self regulating than V60.

    Has anyone ever correlated burr gap to particle size (other than Ditting, but we don't know what the gap is, they must though)?
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