Decent Espresso
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Thread: Decent espresso

  1. #1121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obnic View Post
    Bit off topic but last time my kids were in Britain they complained that the milk tasted sour. I chided them for talking nonsense but on tasting it i could see exactly what they meant.
    When I moved to the states several years ago I had some trouble getting used to how sweet and watery the milk is here. I guess each market has it's own "recipe".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andreugv View Post
    When I moved to the states several years ago I had some trouble getting used to how sweet and watery the milk is here. I guess each market has it's own "recipe".
    Yup ours is mountain meadow fed, organic, free roaming, 3.9% fat deliciousness.
    Espresso: Ceado E92 (modified for single dose); Vesuvius; VST baskets and refractometer.
    Other: Aeropress, Sowden and Alessi Moka Pot; Mazzer Robur doser with Auber timer; Mazzer Mini E; Expobar Leva Dual Boiler

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    I could really taste the difference when i lived in UK some years ago, the milk had a sort of "plastic" taste to it..here in Poland it is kind of neutral (white liquid with faint milky taste), probably gets homogenised on a large scale
    two months ago visiting Slovakia and frothing milk I was blown away how good the coffee was, tasting the milk (cheap supermarket whole) it was great with distinct nutty/hazelnut taste
    Last edited by Stanic; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:06.
    Portaspresso Rossa PG Air, Kinu M68, Feldgrind, Aergrind, Bellman steamer, IMS baskets and tamper, Hario Syphon TC3, Java Maestro dripper, Chemex, Aeropress, French press, Gnali & Zani moka pot, Bonavita kettle & scales, Brita jug

  4. #1124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andreugv View Post
    When I moved to the states several years ago I had some trouble getting used to how sweet and watery the milk is here. I guess each market has it's own "recipe".
    The sweetness is from the heavy amount of sugar in the mostly-corn diet fed to cows in the USA. I'm not sure that any other country feeds their cows mostly corn.

    Here's a lot more on that topic (cows and corn), from author Michael Pollan:
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...ws/pollan.html

    Since I've done a fair amount of travelling and demoing, I usually buy several milks in each area to find the best. In the USA, it's Organic Valley milk, available nationwide from local sources:
    https://www.organicvalley.coop/products/milk/

    The UK has great milk even if chain grocery stores, but in the EU the industrial milk in grocery stores is just ok. Get near the mountains (hello Obnic) and drink local, and yeah, you're in bliss. When I lived in Savoie the local raw milk from the cheese coop was a revelation.

    I'm persuaded that Italian's distaste for cappuccinos is because their milk is mostly watery industrial junk. In July I was there for a few weeks on tour. I bought proper milk from the organic grocery (more and more common there) and 2.5Xed the amount of coffee to milk ratio (they were making cappuccinos with 7g shots) and the Italians were surprised to like the drink. In cafés the cappuccinos were undrinkable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stanic View Post
    I could really taste the difference when i lived in UK some years ago, the milk has a sort of "plastic" taste to it..here in Poland it is kind of neutral (white liquid with faint milky taste), probably gets homogenised on a large scale
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanic View Post
    two months ago visiting Slovakia and frothing milk I was blown away how good the coffee was, tasting the milk (cheap supermarket whole) it was great with distinct nutty/hazelnut taste


    Some UK grocery stores such as Tesco (and M&S) are surprisingly industrial, the closest I've seen to USA grade food. But there's still a lot of really great grocery available in the UK as long as you're either in a poor area (farmer's market) or a rich one (high end grocery).



  5. #1125
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    Default Ordering Decent Espresso Parts

    screen 2017-11-02 at 5.45.15 PM.jpg

    We're beginning to insert all the parts in our Decent Espresso Machines into our shopping system. This will enable anyone to buy the parts to repair/replace anything in our espresso machines.

    A goal is to reassure buyers of our espresso machines that they won't have any trouble getting parts from us. There are no forms to fill out, no approval needed. Everything is transparent. You can even buy parts ahead of time if you're the worrying type.

    We will be posting annotated CAD files to http://onshape.com to make it even easier to see how everything fits together. We'll also be posting our own assembly instructions (videos, tips, and notes) to make disassembly/repair/re-assembly easier.

    Our entire product database (parts and everything else) is publicly available as a Javascript JSON file, with quite a lot of detailed info. This database includes the quantity we have on hand, and much else besides. Click the link to see:
    https://decentespresso.com/js/data/decent_products.js

    Next, we've made the URL to create a shopping cart intentionally very simple. The goal is to help people build software that automatically orders things from us. The URL is composed of pairs of "part number" and "quantity". Here is an example:
    https://decentespresso.com/cart?s=73631+1+73773+1

    For companies that have automated purchasing systems, it's quite easy to integrate our products into your process and a few companies already work with us in that manner.

    As with other things we sell, there is free shipping at 3 items, and price discounting starting at 5 items (10%).

  6. #1126
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    Quote Originally Posted by decent_espresso View Post
    As with other things we sell, there is free shipping at 3 items, and price discounting starting at 5 items (10%).
    You might want to think about this. The rubber sleeve for the steam wand (part 72015) is US$0.72. I could buy 19 of those plus a US$799 grinder, and my sub-total (with the 20% discount for buying 20+ accessories) would be about US$650.

    The same trick would work in the UK, though the cheapest part is (I think) £2, so it doesn't have quite the same effect.

    But regardless of currency, this discounting system seems to encourage the purchase of a few cheap parts for no reason except the discount.

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    I was thinking that as well, but it does say this on the grinder page:

    "Our grinder is not eligible for free shipping or quantity discounts."

    I assume its the same for the other high value items.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bachamp View Post
    I was thinking that as well, but it does say this on the grinder page:

    "Our grinder is not eligible for free shipping or quantity discounts."

    I assume its the same for the other high value items.
    At a minimum, it allows one to get (for US orders) free accessory shipping for US$1.44. On a tamper (which is eligible for quantity discounts), one could buy 4 rubber sleeves plus the tamper. That would save US$10 on shipping plus US$9.90 on the tamper itself, for a net savings of about US$17.

    The Barista Kit (US$449) also seems to be eligible for quantity discounts. In fact, everything except the machines, the Mean Well power supply, the Android tablet, and the grinder seems to be discountable.

    Note that you can't play this game yet with most of the parts, which are marked "todo" in the JSON listing. But the rubber feet inserts are available (for £3 each).

    So right now (and I'll use UK examples in deference to our forum), you can buy a Skale v2 for £94 (84+10 shipping), or a Skale v2 plus 2 rubber feet inserts for £90 (84+6, free shipping), or a Skale v2 plus 4 rubber feet for £86.40 (94+12, 9.60 discount, free shipping).

    That's a non-trivial discount for doing something wasteful.
    Last edited by roastini; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:34. Reason: added some more details

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    Have you twigged that your return-to-base-get-a-new-one warranty model is going to result in a lot of mysterious failures at 1 year 364 days? :^)

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    Quote Originally Posted by roastini View Post
    You might want to think about this. The rubber sleeve for the steam wand (part 72015) is US$0.72. I could buy 19 of those plus a US$799 grinder, and my sub-total (with the 20% discount for buying 20+ accessories) would be about US$650. The same trick would work in the UK, though the cheapest part is (I think) £2, so it doesn't have quite the same effect. But regardless of currency, this discounting system seems to encourage the purchase of a few cheap parts for no reason except the discount.
    Quote Originally Posted by bachamp View Post
    I was thinking that as well, but it does say this on the grinder page: "Our grinder is not eligible for free shipping or quantity discounts." I assume its the same for the other high value items.
    As bachamp noticed, we don't discount the grinder, espresso machine, and other expensive items.

    The minimum price for parts will likely be around $2, not US$0.72, because we still need to order, unbox, store, stock, pick, pack and ship each item. As there are several hundred parts in the database, we haven't yet gone through and compared each part to espressoparts.com and amazon to set a reasonable single-unit price (that's in progress).

    As far as "abusing the discount" system goes, you're absolutely right that someone could order 80 o-rings for $2 in order to get 30% off on their milk jugs.

    However, to prevent such sort of abuse of the system, I'd have to put lots of rules & regulations in, that would unnecessarily complicate things for the 99% honest folk. I quite dislike rules that punish the honest majority in order to potentially stop the dishonest few, and I'd rather (a) wait and see if anyone does actually abuse it and (b) if they do, simply manually notice and email them with a "that's not on" email.

    A fairly simple rule change, if I do need to stop this, would be discount on individual quantity, rather than cumulative. In other words, buying 80 O-rings would get you 30% off that part, but nothing off the single milk jug. That would bring our discounting more into line with industry practices.

    However, I quite like that Coffee Parts in Australia is able to make a "mixed order" from us of 80 different items, on a regular basis, and thus promotes our products to their customer base.
    https://www.coffeeparts.com.au/acces...ecent-espresso
    Last edited by decent_espresso; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:22.

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