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I was asked this question via tech support today, and I thought Iíd share my answer.

This is a very advanced barista technique, so I donít expect most people to need it, but it emerged with my working 1:1 with Matt Perger, and it was the cleanest solution to a set of real coffee making problems, with a very particular technique in espresso making.

-john

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In sentence form, "rise" means "if time runs out on this preinfusion step, and we havenít hit the pressure indicated above, please add a short step after preinfusion, with the flow on max, in order to get pressure to this number. End this short step as soon as this pressure is reached".

Imagine a barista saying "I want preinfusion to compress the puck to at least 4 bar, but I also donít want preinfusion taking more than 20 seconds to do so". RISE guarantees 4 bar as the preinfusion steps end and the shot progresses.

I know, thereís a lot of concepts packed into RISE.

ps: I find RISE to be hugely useful for preinfusion rates under 2 ml/s. Itís pretty much impossible for me to pull those shots otherwise. With those slow preinfusion flow rates, virtually no pressure is created, and so Iím using time to end preinfusion, with a "slam flow to max" short step to compress the puck. Iím trying to automate what Iíve seen some baristas do with paddles.