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islandlad

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About islandlad

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    Lightly Roasted
  1. Cheers, good to know. Might ping them an email then.
  2. Yep, definitely and regrettably looks plastic-y. Still, it's a distant secondary consideration compared to function. Wish they made a chrome version though 😔. Not sure I'd want to risk stripping powder coating off a brand new machine either.
  3. As I'm only interested in electric grinders, everyone seems to be of the same opinion (Niche). Thanks all!
  4. Apologies in advance if this question has been asked before. Feel free to redirect me to an existing post if need be. As per title, I'm after a conical grinder which is handy at single dosing. Niche Zero is the obvious choice - hence £500ish, which also happens to be my budget. I'd like to know whether any other grinders fit the brief as 1) I'd like to know what my options are 2) not at all a fan of the Niche's aesthetics (though that's a secondary consideration). Thanks!
  5. OK then, will PM as soon as I'm back. Thanks.
  6. @Junglebert please let me know if you're still interested.
  7. @Junglebert it's yours if you want it. I am however currently on Easter holidays and will be back home Sunday 28th, so I'd only be able to post then. Is that OK? Fair play if you'd like to pass. Do confirm one way or another as the item's listed on other sites.
  8. As per title - up for grabs is my VST 15g ridged basket. Comes with all original packaging and documentation. Condition is as new, only used twice. Will also be advertising this elsewhere. £20 posted (UK).
  9. I get that the beans I'm currently using, and my grinder, aren't top notch. While I'm definitely interested in a Mignon, I won't be pulling the trigger till later this year. Beans, I'll eventually experiment with something else. Out of curiosity, what makes a bean specifically suited for espresso machines vs. say, drip? What does one need to look out for? Given my current setup, the essence of my question is more related to the baskets I'm using: Stock Gaggia 14g basket = Decent ristrettos with sweetness (using the same Allegro beans linked in post #5) VST 15/18g baskets (with dose/grind/time adjusted accordingly) = Bad/tasteless ristrettos (same beans) I was simply wondering whether the general consensus is that VST baskets are the wrong tool for this job (and I am thus fighting a losing battle and would be better off reverting to the stock basket), or whether they can be made to work for ristrettos and it's just a case of more work homing in on the right dose/grind/time. Post #2 seems to indicate that they're not the ideal tool for my current setup.
  10. Never thought about the importance of resting the beans. Everyone rightly emphasises the importance of fresh beans but I've somehow never read up on the pitfalls of taking it to an extreme. Thanks
  11. Very interesting, did not know that. Re. beans I pick up freshly roasted (1 or 2 days post roast) Allegro Sierra beans directly from Whole Foods. I'm aware they're probably not the absolute best quality, but I thought they might be a decent option before upgrading to more serious stuff. Not a bank buster, more of a niggling mentality probably. Yes, I always weigh to 0.1g. Was only trying to give a general idea of things. My only reason for tamping hard is to attempt to fill to basket as close as possible to its rated dose. e.g. 14g of my medium-dark beans will never ever fit fit in the 15g basket without seriously jamming up against the shower screen were it not for very hard tamping (which obviously has its own serious knock on effects). Indeed I will. Just figured I'd ask for some general direction/pointers. Already grateful for the replies
  12. Yes dose is weighed accurately and precisely to 0.1g. What exactly would you say the Iberital MC2 lacks for ristretto making purposes, and what should I potentially be looking for? I knew that roast would affect dose density, but by golly it's a significant effect. This was a medium roast, approaching dark judging by the amount of surface oils. For the sake of experimentation I've also picked up some medium beans which are definitely lighter than my previous beans. All very valid observations.
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