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Yulia Kolomiytseva

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About Yulia Kolomiytseva

  • Rank
    Lightly Roasted

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  • Location
    London
  • Interests
    Tea, Psychology, helping this world to be happier and better, travel, cooking
  • Occupation
    Environmental Engineer, proud owner of Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega, inspired by my grandparen
  • Twitter Account
    https://twitter.com/EascottBurgess
  1. This is very innovative! But i do agree with you guys, from my knowledge and experience of tea, my humble opinion is that extracting the most from a tea leaf doesn't always yeild the finest tasting brew, if this is what you are after. Yet, if we are simply drinking the tea for health, this is a very good to know! For example, catechins and theanins, give the tea a bitter, astringent flavour. Tea connoseurs endeavour to avoid these at all costs by carefully selecting a temperature to suit each tea e.g. as a rule of thumb, it is recommended to use a temperature of circa 70 - 80 degrees Celcius for white teas, 85 - 90 degrees for black teas etc, because the theanines and catechins are released at different temperatures for each tea. The will also select a high quality tea, which contains fewer of these catechins and theanins, such as a 'pre-Ming Qian' tea - i.e. a tea plucked early on in the year, in the 2 week period of late March - early April. However, catechins and theanins have also been linked to positive impacts on health. http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/superfoods/Pages/is-green-tea-a-superfood.aspx You may consider caffeine a positive or a negative for your health also, depending on your viewpoint. So brewing in this microwave way will ensure the exraction of more of these I presume, since more of the other compunds are extracted. You have to be careful thoough - if you are brewing the tea in the microwave for health, that the tea doesn't contain pesticides and heavy metals, as I have a very strong feeling that more of these will be extracted also, along with the other compmounds. If you are after drinking the tea for your health, check that the tea shop tests every batch for pesticides and ensure EU compliance with Minimum Residue Levels (MRL) on these, as they often don't. But yes, in my opinion, a great article and method, especially if you are drinking the tea for health - good to keep in mind! Thank you for sharing! Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  2. ginagreen, how lovely - very poetic! Yulia X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  3. Mikey1090, although I have turned into a huge lover of tea, including of green tea 5 years ago, I will be honest, I am not entirely convinced that green tea is the best and most scientifically-supported way to boost your metabolism. I am a great supporter of healthy living, so have researched this thoroughly. The NHS is a good source of information on scientific evidence on different claims, as it is peer reviewed by doctors and this is what it says on the matter: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/loseweight/Pages/how-can-I-speed-up-my-metabolism.aspx However, if you would like to get into green tea anyway, in my opinion, a quality loose leaf dragonwell (also called 'Long Jing' or 'Lung Ching' in Chinese) as suggested above, is a wonderful place to start! I used to think I don't like unflavoured green tea 5 years ago, when I only drank it in tea bags - it tasted like astringent dishwater to me, until I came across a quality loose leaf tea given as a gift from China to a dear friend of mine, who gave it to me. It wasn't a dragonwell (I think it was a more vegetal, more delicate tea like a Yun Wu green tea), but I would also recommend that a dragonwell is a much better place to start as it has a lot more flavour - it is very toasty and nutty, being a lovely, rich, pan roasted green tea. Especially if you are used to the richness of coffee, then this would be the most suitable green tea - I think. Freshness and quality of the leaf especially the tie of year it was plucked - in March - early April is best) is very important though, as green tea loses its flavour, leaving the astringency only quickly. Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  4. I love a good authentic chai latte! A good friend of mine is from the beautiful sunny Goa and she makes a delicious chai latte for me when I visit - it is like some motherly love in a cup. But I do agree with Foussongin above that a genuinely lovely chai latte means getting up at least 10 minutes earlier. I've posted a recipe I use on my blog: https://www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk/copy-of-yunnan-vanilla-milk, but the idea is, in my personal opinion, that it is better to just buy a base tea you really like (it is likely to taste better than the powdered tea in the shop chai latte, so it will add a complexity of flavour to your drink), mixing some chai spices up and vanilla pod to store in a container and in the morning, just heating up some milk/ cream and dropping the leaves and spices in to infuse (perhaps in a muslin bag to avoid needing to strain) and adding honey to taste. This is so much more delicious, authentic and special than what you get in a shop and will have a lot less of the harmful sugar and chemical flavourings often found in shop-bought premixed chai lattes. But I do agree this is time consuming in my opinion, so I either do this on special occasions or when I am feeling particularly motivated and optimistic! Yulia. X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  5. That's a great idea in my opinion too! I always use a teatiere with very broken up leaves actually, especially when I'm at work, where a teapot and strainer draw a lot of attention from my co-workers. Not sure if I'm the only one who found this? With whole quality leaves with greater sweetness, where brewing for longer won't impair the flavour, I do prefer to just put them straight into the cup. Because the leaves are whole, they absorb the water and fall to the bottom when steeped, which releases more flavour and to keep rebrewing them. It's lovely to watch the leaves this way and the flavour is much more complex this way. However, if you don't like to brew them for as long as I do or want to share your tea, then a cafetiere is great even for good quality wholeleaf tea - you put 3 g in (1 - 2 heaped teaspoons of whole leaves), 0.5 - 1 cup of boiling water depending on preference and the number of people you are catering for (tea connoseurs recommend to use specific temperatures on different teas to prevent the release of the bitter catechins, but from my experience, a genuinely good quality tea will not have much bitterness even when btrewed with boiling water, which I like) into the cefetiere, stand for a minute or so depending on the tea and presonal preference, then strain and get a very sweet flavourful brew hopefully. With transparent cafetieres, you also get to benefit from the mesmorising dance of the leaves, which I find relaxing. And you can then even share your tea with your co-workers for a tea break, which I enjoy. I would highly recommend rebrewing your high quality leaves in the cafetiere instead of discarding them though. Tea-tieres are very similar to cafetieres actually: https://jingtea.com/shop/tea-iere But a cafetiere is much more affordable and available, so I'd personally recommend it, in my opinion. Do be careful as to not use the same cafetiere as for your coffee if you are also a coffee lover, as to not impair the fllavour of your tea, as it is more delicately flavoured. My brother received this lovely tea-tiere though as a gift, which I thought was genius if you want something especially designed for tea thoough: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...hps_bw_c_x_3_w Unlike other sellers, this one is all made of glass (plastic is believed to impair the flavour of good quality and more delicate teas) - if this is the one that my brother has, the tea is brewed at the top, then you press a button and the liquor is released at the bottom and you can then drink it as out of a cup. But I personally believe a cafetiere is more than sufficient. Has anyone else tried the cafetiere for this? Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  6. Haha that sounds like a very intriguing extra innovative solution. How do you do that Rhys? Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  7. Tea-tieres are very similar to cafetieres actually: https://jingtea.com/shop/tea-iere But a cafetiere is much more affordable and available, so I'd personally recommend it, in my opinion. Do be careful as to not use the same cafetiere as for your coffee if you are also a coffee lover, as to not impair the fllavour of your tea, as it is more delicately flavoured. My brother received this lovely tea-tiere though as a gift, which I thought was genius if you want something especially designed for tea thoough: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01A94KT5C/ref=s9_acsd_hps_bw_c_x_3_w Unlike other sellers, this one is all made of glass (plastic is believed to impair the flavour of good quality and more delicate teas) - if this is the one that my brother has, the tea is brewed at the top, then you press a button and the liquor is released at the bottom and you can then drink it as out of a cup. But I personally believe a cafetiere is more than sufficient. Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  8. That's a great idea in my opinion too GerryM! I always use this with very broken up leaves actually, especially when I'm at work, where a teapot and strainer draw a lot of attention from my co-workers. Not sure if I'm the only one who found this? With whole quality leaves with greater sweetness, where brewing for longer won't impair the flavour, I do prefer to just put them straight into the cup. Because the leaves are whole, they absorb the water and fall to the bottom when steeped, which releases more flavour and to keep rebrewing them. It's lovely to watch the leaves this way and the flavour is much more complex this way. However, if you don't like to brew them for as long as I do or want to share your tea, then a cafetiere is great even for good quality wholeleaf tea - you put 3 g in (1 - 2 heaped teaspoons of whole leaves), 0.5 - 1 cup of boiling water depending on preference and the number of people you are catering for (tea connoseurs recommend to use specific temperatures on different teas to prevent the release of the bitter catechins, but from my experience, a genuinely good quality tea will not have much bitterness even when btrewed with boiling water, which I like) into the cefetiere, stand for a minute or so depending on the tea and presonal preference, then strain and get a very sweet flavourful brew hopefully. With transparent cafetieres, you also get to benefit from the mesmorising dance of the leaves, which I find relaxing. And you can then even share your tea with your co-workers for a tea break, which I enjoy. I would highly recommend rebrewing your high quality leaves in the cafetiere instead of discarding them though. Has anyone else tried the cafetiere for this? Yulia. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, called the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
  9. This is very innovative! How long does it take for the tea to percolate though? I do agree with the above that tea normally requires at least 30 seconds or so to infuse in a gaiwan, where you would need 8 g to the 140 ml of water for an optimal taste, and much longer (at least a minute, dependng on the leaf surface area, if brewed Western style - does this cup fit this criteria? Even if it doesn't, I have a feeling this would be perfect for more astringent and more broken up tea leaves with a larger surface area though, as it will produce a sweeter brew I can imagine due to the lower brewing time. The plastic can also impair the flavour, but once again, if you have a very strong flavoured tea, this will probably not be a problem. But I do agree that with DavecUK that this would not be necessary for a genuinely good quality leaf tea, where the leaves are very whole, as they just tent to soak up the water and fall to the bottom, so you don't even need a tea strainer or a tea utensil - you can just add it straight into the up if you like and it'll be lovely, sweet and flavourful. Thank you for sharing - definitely would consider it for the broken up teas which are less sweet/ stronger! Yulia X -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our tea bottega: www.eastcottandburgess.co.uk A proud co-owner of my family-run artisan tea company, caled the Eastcott & Burgess Tea Bottega. Inspired by my English grandparents, their life-long, unwaning love for tea and by the beautiful countryside of Surrey county. Our aim is to inspire and to make this world a happier place through tea.
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