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BlackCatCoffee

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BlackCatCoffee last won the day on May 11

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About BlackCatCoffee

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  • Location
    Norfolk
  • Interests
    Coffee, Coffee, Coffee
  • Occupation
    Owner of Black Cat Coffee

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  1. Nobody can tell you what battery you need without knowing what your draw will be and for how long you intend to operate per day. Go through all your gear, look at the rated wattage and add it all up. Then you will have a starting point. I am not trying to be difficult, I just do not want to suggest something that is unsuitable.
  2. I know it is appalling. I have now put it right so I am at my full tilt red hot maximum........
  3. You have made a great choice. The Gran Gaggia etc are kitchen appliances, the Classic is a true espresso machine.
  4. Can you tell I haven't had any coffee this morning??
  5. You need to add up what is the maximum total draw of your appliances is. It isn't much good saying I have X Y & Z as power draw can vary enormously. Do not forget to factor in things like your espresso machine pump and flojet etc. This is so important to get right I would advise that you speak to a specialist. Don't buy cheap stuff either, it doesn't take many lost days trading to pay the difference between the junk stuff and the quality - I speak from experience...... Try: https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/
  6. I would suggest you measure the temperature of your milk with a thermometer whilst steaming. You should be looking to achieve a temperature of around 55-60c. Once you can accurately do this by touch then you could ditch the thermometer if you wish. The thing you don't mention is your routine. Are you steaming then pulling a shot so the milk cools a little or do you have an HX or DB and do both at the same time?
  7. I would echo this. I have sold a lot of Mignon grinders and I haven't had any misalignment of the burrs reported to me. In actual fact, the name escapes me now but there is a very reputable company that has done and in depth review of the Mignon and say that they have found in their experience burr alignment to be better out of the box than on the EK43. I do not think it is something people should be worrying about by default unless of course they run in to problems like a previous poster.
  8. I am sure he will be delighted. Convenience is the order of the day with a little one on the way I think. The best thing you can do get a quality cup is of course use freshly roasted quality coffee. Dodge the stuff in the supermarket.......
  9. Just to make it clear at @Oz_Peter as I have realised I didn't actually answer your question - as far as I am aware there is no inexpensive on demand direct to portafilter coffee grinder on the market hence my suggestions of some used ones that may be in budget. If you are on a really tight budget then look for an inexpensive burr grinder and just empty the grind hopper in to a portafilter with a funnel to make it easier like this one - Please check your portafilter size!! https://www.amazon.co.uk/51mm-Coffee-Grinder-Dosing-Funnel/dp/B07SKV9S7B No matter how tight your budget, do not buy a blade grinder. You may as well get a bag of whole bean coffee and stamp on it a few times - you will get the same consistency.
  10. Agree with the advice you have been given. A used grinder would be great or go for a hand grinder. Some options to look out for on the used market - Compak / Fracino K6, Mazzer Super Jolly (Doser), Eureka Mignon, Rancilio Rocky, Ascaso i1, Iberital MC2 (On Demand). I can tell you this though - if you intend to keep with your current machine long term using its pressurised basket / portafilter system you do not need to be crazy picky about a grinder because the grind does not make a massive difference when using pressurised systems. The advantage the grinder will give you is that you coffee will be ground fresh. If on the other hand you see yourself upgrading in the future then look for one of the grinders I suggested above as they will do the job with a non pressurised commercial style espresso machine. Check out this video if you would like an inexpensive hand grinder:
  11. I think that is a possible explanation but if they were operating this as a loss leader, on a product of £10 it would likely be tens of pennies so even then the cost per kilo of green coffee would still be deep in to bottom commodity grade stuff. I am still curious. I would probably end up pulling a few shots then having 2kg of coffee to deal with so it seems kinda wasteful......
  12. If this is how the group looks, your boiler will likely look similar. Descale time! I would think about what water you are using in the machine. If you run on bottled (the right bottled) or water filtered through a suitable jug, not only will your machine be protected you will get better tasting coffee too.
  13. The set up suggested above would absolutely produce better results than any bean to cup. However, espresso at home is really a hobby. He needs to be willing to spend time in the mornings and also time to learn how to produce good quality drinks. It is VERY easy to produce poor coffee with an espresso machine if you do not know what you are doing. If you are happy to sacrifice quality for convenience and speed then absolutely go bean to cup. I am reliably told that Melitta make the best B2C machines for the domestic market. If either of you are what they are describing as key emergency workers (take a look at the list on their site) they are currently offering 20% off if you buy direct from them - https://www.melitta.co.uk/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIl72hn-LM6QIVEO3tCh1I1QqeEAAYASAAEgLOnfD_BwE You could get a Caffeo CI Fully Auto B2C machine for £399 seems a decent deal if you go this route.
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