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LouisF

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About LouisF

  • Rank
    Lightly Roasted

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  • Location
    The Strand, Western Cape Province, South Africa
  • Interests
    Coffee, working with leather, off-roading (not currently active here), hifi
  • Occupation
    Pensioner
  1. How does one edit one's signature again Did it a few days ago but now, try as I might, I cannot find that feature.
  2. Water cannot condensate on a surface at temperatures in excess of 60°C. I steam into an empty container to see if there is a lot of water emitted along with the steam because it is common knowledge as far as I have read in many different publications (posts, articles of the how-to type, etc.) that you purge the steam nozzle to prevent water being blown into the milk so you can produce proper foam. I am looking for a cause of poor milk texturing, and checking for water coming from the steam nozzle is a possible cause as far as I can see. One can actually hear [edit 12-11-2018] minute drops as they make a spitting sort of noise when shooting from the steam nozzle. I hear what you are saying about water condensing in the milk. Makes sense. The milk could also be the problem, but I used a milk brand used by at least two reputable coffee shops in the vicinity and they get perfect foam from it. I have never attended a barista course; all I know about espresso and steaming is what I found in a lot of articles on the web and watching many many videos on the subject. Planning to go do a barista course in the near future, toting along my own machine, to up my coffee game. May report back on that sometime.
  3. I checked the pressure at 1.2 B, steamed for 30 s (did purging blast first), pressure fell to 0.9 B for the duration and quickly went up to 1.2 B again when I closed the steam valve. Water in a vessel that was too hot to touch - cannot be condensation - 2.4 g. I would appreciate it if someone could run a similar test on a similar machine.
  4. I am also beginning to suspect the milk, but why all that water in the hot vessel when I blow steam into it? What is the situation with other Brewus owners?
  5. Do you also find water in an empty vessel when you steam into that as I have described in my opening post?
  6. Thanks for all your advice guys. Yes, I agree the technical guy did not know what he was talking about for I did find the probe to be at maximum depth already. I have descaled the machine before opening this thread, so the probe is as clean as a whistle. The machine had its second birthday last month so I believe the pressure stat is where you describe, Rob. Shall have a go at that in the next couple of days and report back.
  7. Thanks. Machine has been descaled, but I shall have a look at the probe, as per your suggestion. The technical guy at my supplier did suggest I should adjust the probe's depth, but your suggestion makes more sense. Perhaps my descaling has not been 100% effective.
  8. (Sorry, please ignore, I saw too late that my previous post on this has been moved elsewhere.)
  9. What could be the cause of the excessive wetness of the steam on such a machine? The technical guy at the agents I purchased it from said it could be that the sensor regulating water level in the steam kettle allows too high a level of water in the kettle, but how can this came about when the machine has been making good micro foam six months ago and has not been tampered with in any way? When steaming into a vessel that has been heated with boiling water, a lot of water appears in the vessel, even if I let go a good, prolonged purging dose of steam first? The result is that milk would not foam properly as I have become used to in the past almost two years since I bought the machine. Any suggestions?
  10. I live in the small seaside village of Lambert's Bay on the western coast (actually referred to as the West Coast region) of our Western Cape Province. Pensioner, happily married, three married children and 4 grandchildren, with a fifth one on its way. I have always loved coffee, using a filter machine and a FP for several years before buying espresso gear. The first machine was a small steam affair, followed by one with a pump but also very much entry level. Acquired a Krups burr grinder, also entry level. Moved up to a SAECO Vienna Plus super auto machine some years ago and thought it makes good espresso. I became fed up with its silly steam wand fitted with a panarello, so I bought a Jura milk foaming device, which produces foam but of course no steamed milk. Nice for making hot chocolate, milkshakes and other stuff that needs to be stirred (heated or not, as required) vigorously - Dom Pedro's, for instance. Then I started surfing the net for a decent espresso machine. Discovered the web site of an on-line shop we have here after a lot of searching. I was fascinated by what I saw there and started doing some more research on the ins and outs of espresso and all that goes with it. So I am now in the process of upgrading in quite a huge way and that is why I landed on this site in search of reviews on the Vario Home grinder. And that's my story for now.
  11. I was searching for reviews on the Vario Home grinder when I happened onto your site and joined there and then. That was less than an hour ago.
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