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timmyjj21

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About timmyjj21

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  1. For the record, in case anyone else has this issue, the much safer option would be to sit the upper boiler in a 100 degree oven for a few hours. The element insulation absorbs water, creating a short for the element if it gets really wet. Of course removing the machines earth and letting the element turn on while will generate enough heat for it to dry, but it is also pretty dodgy as it will be shorting until enough water is evaporated. A hot oven is safe and less likely to totally fry the boiler element.
  2. Also,.FYI, blowing through the solenoid when it’s dismantled does not prove that it is working. There are 2 water pathways that it is selecting between, and the largest hole is never going to be the issue and it lets all your puffing go through. Get a pin and give the tiny central hole a good poke and jiggle from both sides.
  3. Very, very rarely the solenoid coil fails. This is the black box part. I’ve seen it once and it’s pretty rare. As stated above, can you feel the solenoid click when you turn the brew switch on? If you can, then the coil is good. Fully blocking the boiler water path is unlikely, however blocking the solenoid outlet is very very common. This is the tiny pin hole in the centre of the solenoid that also has an internal 90 degree bend associated. Blockage here is so common that most people who claim to have cleaned their solenoid and refused to believe the advice end up cleaning the solenoid
  4. Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but @phario PM’d me about this mod to see how it was going and it’s been years since I’ve logged in! It took me a good number of years to upgrade from the Gaggia as I found the shots to be consistent, repeatable and too my liking. The deciding factor was simply the single boiler faff. I still have the Gaggia in a cupboard though! One thing I’ll note is that the outlet of the preheater box should really be on the top of the box. Having space at the top like mine allows air to accumulate and reduce it’s efficacy. Even worse, in my fiddling I actually have
  5. Oohh! I haven't seen one of those gauges in a long time! Rare as hens teeth looking good!
  6. May also be the thermal fuse being blown? Usually due to a faulty thermostat overheating. The switch block can be opened up carefully and the contacts cleaned, which may be all it needs. I have ‘repaired’ one machine like this. Just be careful of the internal springs!
  7. And my last QC niggle.... the pinhole in the wood where the drill tip had gone a bit too far. Im really happy with the quality overall, I’m just picky Im really sad that it’s been several days and I haven’t even had the chance use it yet! Reading all the rave reviews after work while it sits on the floor!
  8. One question for other white owners.... My grinder evidently rattled its way to Australia and where the front lid magnet has rubbed the paint it has been damaged. Has anyone else has this issue too?
  9. Arrived in Australia super fast! Never received any shipping info so an unexpected delight. The coffee corner now needs a re-organise!
  10. Definitely worth the repair! Otherwise I’ll put my hand up for it too! It’s probably just the brew thermostat, located on the left side of the boiler. Simple to fix.
  11. The bugger with them is the steam boiler has an aluminium base half, so both parts get pitted over time and it can’t easilty be repaired and resealed
  12. Blowing the thermal fuse is the symptom of a problem, not a cause. why did the machine overheat enough to blow the thermal fuse? Often you need to check the brew and/or steam thermostats too.
  13. Yeah, thats a tricky one. Ive never seen it mentioned anywhere and thankfully never needed to find one during my refurbishments. Looks like a Viton (green from memory?) and possibly Gaggia users group have some hints?
  14. So, confirm: 1) machine turns on and heats up (left most switch 0-1) 2) machine can also reach steam temperature (centre switch with steam picture) 3) machine shorts when you press the brew switch (right switch with coffee picture) Pressing the brew switch activates the pump and the solenoid, both of which use electricity, and near the leak source! Check them both, the solenoid is usually pretty bomb proof and rarely fails. Your pump appears to be an ancient Invensys with a thermal protection module on the side, this is a possible source of failure if it got wet (see warnings abo
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