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jable1066

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About jable1066

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    Lightly Roasted

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    Newcastle
  1. Not sure why it says that? I had in the original post said Newcastle so apologies for any confusion... it's Newcastle Upon Tyne for collection. Still available.
  2. I'm in Wallsend, just through the Tyne Tunnel. Just outside of Newcastle.
  3. @johnnyka7 If you could go up to £475 it's yours. I've got an offer on eBay at the minute, but will reject that if you want it. Jonny
  4. I did indeed @dfk41 haha! Did you buy it? I use this machine even less now that I don't have the K30!! Resetting our filter grinder is too much...
  5. I bought used, I've probably put about 100 through since owning it. I run a coffee business and thought I might want a home espresso machine but I get enough of it at work and prefer to drink filter as I don't take it milky... So it's barely been used since owning. Edit to add... I bought it in Feb last year.
  6. For sale is my Quick Mill Anita. Comes with double shot portafilter (no single unfortunately). Used with bottled water only, in great condition apart from the front right leg is a little bent due to transportation. Really only drink filter these days and I'm moving house so I guess we could use the funds for something a little more appropriate... Like a new bed... or a chair... Sigh. Has been a great machine - really good at bouncing back after multiple drinks, lots of headroom with the steam and can pull shots whilst steaming without issue. Looking at collection only from Newcastle as my experience with posting coffee machines has never been positive. Can deliver within a suitable radius for a fee i.e. 50 miles being the max, or meet at a halfway point if the price is right. On eBay for £650, but happy to take £550 cash to people on here. Any questions, don't hesitate to ask and I'll do my best. Jonny --phone number removed--
  7. Hasbeans customer service is absolutely superb. And their coffee is just rather delicious too! Pleasure to work with.
  8. I would concur that getting some professional advice would certainly go a long way as there'd undoubtedly be things you've not thought of! As would a contingency fund for the eventuality that things may go a bit pear shaped to begin. That being said, I think the danger of having a large contingency would be that you may get emotionally invested and may not know when to tow the line and say enough is enough. Have a clear and realistic plan for the worst case scenario and stick to it. Estate agents will say anything to close a deal so take what they say with a pinch of salt. I take it you've negotiated rent etc. with the landlord? It'd be worth seeing if you can get a rental break if you're potentially going to add value to his/her property. Like has been mentioned, I'd calculate all costs and then leave a margin of error - probably can't go wrong saying +/- 10%. From there, work out how much it costs to open your doors on a daily basis. Then it's a case of gauging whether or not you think you can make that, which is where market research and visiting similar shops will come into play. Work out how much you need to live and base your wage off this. There will no doubt be a compromise and you will put way more work in than what can be realised in monetary terms, but it's worth paying a wage that makes life bearable! Me and my partner did a hell of a lot of research, talking through the finances and even putting an offer on a cafe. However, we reasoned that whilst it may have been financially viable, we weren't leaving ourselves with a lot of wiggle room if things went wrong. We'd be investing a huge amount of capital for potentially 70 hour work weeks, stress and minimum wage. We decided to pull out in the end and stick with mobile coffee/catering for the time being and put our money elsewhere. I wish you well in your adventure, and I am a tad enviable! JB
  9. Me and the Mrs did an afternoon of training with Gary when we first set up our wholesale account with HasBean. Still carrying forward that knowledge today! Great guy!
  10. It honestly seems like a lot of people are really missing the point? This is clearly an enthusiasts toy. With regard to output - who cares? If you don't want to buy it, don't buy it. If roasting 50g of coffee does not appeal to you... then don't buy this roaster. It is quite clearly intended for people who are interested in roasting at home, in small quantity. People who are seduced by the fact you can profile and use an app etc. It is quite sexy and I can see why this appeals. The price is even fairly irrelevant. Spending £15k on a KVdW is hardly justifiable is it? Spending £100k on a car, that is hardly justifiable. People buy things because they want them. They don't have to justify the price. I've seen peoples signatures of this forum detailing home espresso set ups that rival what I use commercially! If not exceed it. Is it necessary? Hardly. So why is this product receiving so much hate when a lot of people direct it at the price and output? I don't get why people are trying to work out the value of buying this bit of kit in monetary terms. I can't remember working out a logical cost value analysis on my action men when I was a kid? You buy cool sh*t, because you want it. I wish them all the success in the world. They've come up with what seems like an intuitive product, which is probably fairly well placed in today's specialty coffee market. People aren't scared to flash a bit of cash at gucci products. Just look at the fact people are willing to spend nearly £200 on a set of scales!! Or the fact that people are willing to don their lab coats and spend £600 on a bloody refractometer! The whole industry is madness. Just enjoy it. Or don't. I'm out though, and I shall not be buying one. JB
  11. Ah, I was hoping to start a topic of conversation about batch brewing too! The Brazen is great, I have one and think you can get a really decent cup from it. As for not getting the whole brew in 1 cup - just swill the airpot thoroughly before decanting. If you do that before every cup, the brew should be fairly evenly distributed? At least for 99.9% of palettes anyway. I absolutely adore batch brewing. I think there's something so nostalgic and comforting about it. I'm not even talking, speciality grade batch brewing either. I have a secret love of dark and spine tinglingly bitter batch brew. It's not to say I like it more or less than 3rd wave style coffee, it just occupies a different space in my heart. Like when you love your dog more than your wife/girlfriend/children (delete as appropriate)... I get good cups with 6g/100ml up until about the 1l mark where it can go to about 5.5g/100ml. If I was brewing more, I'd even go to 5g/100ml but I guess it'd be dependent on coffee origin. I've also found grinding on the finer side of where you'd go for filter works quite well and helps get a nice sweet cup, especially when you drop the brew ratio a bit. I'm looking at getting the Marco Filtro Shuttle for my newest coffee trailer, just waiting on trying to snag a bargain! Not sure if anyone has seen the 3TEMP Hipster? Now they look bloody amazing, however for around £5k you'd want a decent spec! - JB
  12. Hey, Coffee: between £8-20 depending on roaster Cups + lids: £60-100 depending on thickness and size Stirrers/sugars: probably the least of your worries - £5-10 LPG: about £20 a month if that Then you've got... Van/trailer insurance, storage, public and employers liability, accountancy costs, maintenance, milk, equipment depreciation, pitch fees, sleeves etc. Price per cup will also depend on cup size/type of drink/shot size. Whether it's a 7g (god forbid), 14/16/18 or even 20g shot can all impact. Take into consideration dialling in every day and waste... Ingredients - £0.12-£0.30 a cup... Taking into account everything else - £F*ck knows...
  13. Hey, welcome to the world of mobile coffee, kind of! I echo the sentiments of many here, and would opt for a dual fuel espresso machine. I would 100% go 2 group, especially if you're going to get rushes. I wouldn't even entertain a single group. A 2 group could potentially make 4 coffees at a time if you split shots. I'd get a decent on demand grinder too, as if you're going 10-15 minutes without serving you don't really want stale coffee in a chamber to dose out. I would also get a decent batch brewer. You can pick up nearly new Bunn ICB's on eBay or Bidspotter or maybe a Marco Shuttle or Jet. You could potentially brew 5 litre batches and even have a self serve option to speed things up and lighten the workload. The batch brewer will have a fairly high power consumption so make sure there's a decent electricity supply. I wouldn't fret about not having water plumbed in - a few 25l food grade jerry cans and a 12v shurflo caravan pump will sort that problem out. You can also save space on not plumbing a filter/softener in and could potentially filter the water prior to going into the jerry cans. Other than that, just make sure you get some good training and be prepared to be flexible in the face of adverse circumstances! It's great fun... Jonny
  14. Hello from Wallsend/Newcastle! Which beans are you using? Do you weigh each dose etc? I know they've probably told you a method but to dial in a bean and minimise waste just concentrate on one variable at a time. Set your dose to 18g (or whatever number you like).... don't worry about what the timer says... and aim to pull 36g of espresso (or double the weight of the coffee you used). Adjust grind till you find the taste you like. Newly roasted beans will behave rather volatile like in espresso, so give them a good 5-10 days to rest up and de-gas. Jonny
  15. Hello from Wallsend/Newcastle! Which beans are you using? Do you weigh each dose etc? I know they've probably told you a method but to dial in a bean and minimise waste just concentrate on one variable at a time. Set your dose to 18g (or whatever number you like).... don't worry about what the timer says... and aim to pull 36g of espresso (or double the weight of the coffee you used). Adjust grind till you find the taste you like. Newly roasted beans will behave rather volatile like in espresso, so give them a good 5-10 days to rest up and de-gas. Jonny
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