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Showing content with the highest reputation on 31/08/20 in all areas

  1. 100% agree that the vessel makes a subjective difference. I don't buy into the crazy marketing foo and pseudoscience that often accompanies 'groundbreaking developments' but am totally on board with having a suitable vessel that enhances the experience and indeed the taste. Same as wine, or the classic one being Coke in bottles being better than in tins. You only have to look at the various threads about 'normal' espresso demitasse etc to see that cuppage matters to a lot of people, and it need not be bound by tradition. ___ Eat, drink and be merry
    4 points
  2. Photo of my Dad (dragan effect), think it shows the age and blemishes with a bit of a gritty feel.
    3 points
  3. If the PC is connected to Internet may I suggest the following: 1. on your Mac subscribe to iCloud storage using the settings from your/ registered user. Costs a few £ a month. Once subscribe copy your photos (upload) which will take time depending on how big the file is and your internet upload speed. It could take hours. Enjoy some coffee. 2. On the PC download iCloud and install 3. Login to the PC iCloud and your photos will appear eventually. They can be accessed from any Apple device that is logged into the account. apologies for idiots guide. After retiring from teaching ICT it is hard to not so do. regards from sunny Portugal and hope this helps
    2 points
  4. I agree. I've been reading about it more seriously over the last few weeks and have decided to probably get one this year. Main downside though is it's incredibly ugly. Subjective of course, some people love it, but to me it's like they've gone out of their way to make it a 70's style version of the future. On aesthetics it looks like it should cost £50 not £500. It's not a deal breaker but that's because the insides are such good value and there's no other choice for what it does at the price point as far as I can see, without going second hand and then there's trade offs and hassles. @Bhoy Wonder To answer your question, I'm a single doser like you, I'm one/two coffees a day. I've been reading up slowly on the choices £500 and below and if buying new, it's between the Specialita and Niche. Main questions to ask are probably how much do you drink (as Specialita needs beans in hopper really), flat v conical burrs and burr size (is that a consideration, do you drink med/dark or light roasts etc) and are you changing brew methods/bean choice regularly. There's loads of threads about the Niche on here, two main ones in that forum were helpful. Bear in mind there's a bit of a civil war on here with the Niche, some love it and will bat for it, then there's some people that think it's overrated. From what I can tell the first camp are the huge majority. Likewise in the Eureka forum there's threads on Specialita, I'd go through all those before making your choice. Also, put Niche into Youtube and see what people that having been using it for a while say, people not forum-related. Also bear in mind, if you did get a Niche and for some reason didn't like it you could sell it on here for probably full price and someone would buy it.
    2 points
  5. 2 points
  6. I have a Niche and love it! It's unobtrusive, quiet and needs minimal maintenance. Long waiting list for one, and the second hand price is liable to only lose you £100. There is a thread on what people don't like about it but to me it's all nit picking with no real disadvantages given.
    2 points
  7. As a lifelong mac user that's pretty much my understanding of it too. You should be able to copy everything from the NTFS drive but not write to it. There are also copying programmes like Carbon Copy Cloner or my favourite, SuperDuper! (from Shirtpocket) which will clone a disk entirely, although I don't know how that would pan out with NTFS cloning to a target volume that by definition can't be NTFS. ___ Eat, drink and be merry
    2 points
  8. Macs can read NTFS but not write to them. So if you just want to view your photos, that should be fine. If you want anything else you'll have a few options. DO NOT reformat the drive, that will over-write your photos and you will lose them. Reformatting is for an empty drive or if you do not care about the photos/info on the drive. I thought you could 'import' photos from a normal drive onto a mac drive, just not another NTFS drive. Have a read through this article, it explain your options: https://www.techradar.com/uk/how-to/how-to-use-ntfs-drives-on-a-mac If you feel comfortable, there's a couple of solutions in this article: https://hubmanual.com/use-ntfs-drives-on-mac/ I can build a PC but I have never actually used a mac, so maybe someone else will come along and offer a better solution!
    2 points
  9. 1) Tap water could be fine depending on where you live and the quality of your water. Mine is almost perfect for brewing. 2) Speciality coffee will be better than cheap coffee. I don't understand the link between budget and quality of coffee. What is your budget relating to (equipment to brew or monthly coffee budget?). Speciality coffee can cost £30+ a kilo an is generally above £20. Cheap coffee can be less than £10 a kilo. You will taste a difference brewing in a french press or any other brew method. 3) Pre-ground supermarket coffee isn't as good as wholebean supermarket coffee, so yes pre-ground is always going to be worse. Depending on your brew method you will only need a very cheap grinder. E.G A long steep in a french press or sowden will require a grinder worth about £30. 4) How much does it matter? Well you get different styles of coffee from the different brew methods. Depending on what you like that might be better or worse. Some people don't like espresso and prefer filter. Going for an espresso machine requires an expensive grinder and accessories. I would say you need to use a filtering jug if your water isn't good, and you would need to think about what type of filter you use and why you're using it (what change you are trying to achieve). You should get the best beans you can afford monthly and grind them by hand for a brew method that doesn't require very consistent fine grinds. You can enjoy good coffee on a micro budget set up so long as you can budget monthly for the high quality coffee.
    2 points
  10. I've not had a good experience and got rid fairly quickly. Others have fared better. If darker roasts are your thing then you should be OK. Consistency and inability to grind fine without major channelling seems to be the big issue.
    2 points
  11. 1 - We need to know the properties of the water you are discussing, most tap water & most bottled water are not particularly suitable, as bottled water is pretty much tap water with less treatment, poured into a bottle. 2 - If you start with a better tasting ingredient (or ingredients, as we will include the water) your potential for a great tasting cup goes up dramatically. You can't score say a 8/9 for a coffee that is only capable of 6/9 (though if you happen to like more generic coffees, 6-7/9 might be fine for you). 3 - Best to grind before brewing, for coarser manual methods you could use preground, but generally you have less control as you can't change grind size & pre ground can come in wildly different grind sizes, or sizes that are OK for a few methods, rather than ideal for the one you are actually using. There are cheap & capable grinders that make tasty brews, like Porlex, Hario Slim, Rhino, De Longhi KG79, but they are slow to grind & best suited for smaller doses (<20g). You need to be very physically careful with a French press & really good tasting brews can take a fair while. A Melitta pourover cone (with one hole) can be used without a special gooseneck kettle and your brew is done 3-4minutes after the kettle has boiled. less self regulating brewers are better off with a gooseneck. 4 - Largely no, if you nail any brew method you will get a good result. If you are restricted on budget, espresso doesn't make much sense as you will need a tamper, maybe milk jug & whatever other accessories you deem necessary. The aforementioned grinders will make espresso a chore & very frustrating. A filter jug may/may not be an advantage depending on what it actually does & what your water is to start with, your water authority can provide a report on your water. You haven't mentioned the most important tool - scales. You need some 0.1g (at least) scales for dosing the coffee & weighing your brew water/pours.
    2 points
  12. As above. Zeak pretty much nailed it really. You're drinking a mixture of water and beans. They both need to be good. You can't really make espresso on a budget, but Aeropress is cheap and easy. You need next to no expertise, the kit is cheap, the method doesn't require a high end grinder and you can concentrate on buying good fresh beans and grinding them yourself as required. ___ Eat, drink and be merry
    2 points
  13. If my budget was limited to a 100 moneyz and I had no equipment, I'd buy a Brita jug (or Peak, but that's stretching it and questionable), an alright budget grinder (Rhino/Porlex.., but ideally something better, like MBK) and either an Aeropress or V60/Clever. The rest I'd spend on good beans. I think these two methods are an easy way in and do their job very well. The rest is about your techniques. IMO a French press is a bit limiting as in mind it's not really useful for anything on the lighter (or even medium) side of roast. Same goes for a moke pot - I love it more that americanos, but again, it won't give you the desired flexibility. Espresso is a different beast and unless you're willing to invest into a machine and a decent grinder, I'd stay away.
    2 points
  14. Here is how to justify it: You are tired of temp-surfing, you consider fitting a PID, but the price for an Auber is almost the cost of the machine, and you prefer to put that money towards a new machine that keeps the correct temperature. This worked for me anyway. (if you already have a PID - you are doomed, and I can't help you. :-)).
    2 points
  15. Less chance of messing up the extraction and, besides, you get a bigger cup. Thought of producing a sink espresso shot with this makes me wince.
    2 points
  16. Interesting post. Having had both Classic and a Silvia, prompted me to check where the models stand currently, spec-wise and price. There are several variants of both the Gaggia Classic and Rancilio Silvia. Historically, the Silvia was considerably more expensive than the Classic. Older Classic variants had smaller aluminium boilers compared to the bigger brass one on the Silvia making the Silvia much more capable for steaming. The Gaggia Classic 2015 variant had neither a solenoid or an OPV to allow you to adjust bar pressure - very much a step backwards but favoured a stainless steel boiler over the older model's aluminium. Latest Gaggia Classic boasts an OPV, solenoid but has gone back to an aluminium boiler. The latest Gaggia Classic is around £90.00 cheaper than the latest Rancilio Silvia. For that, you get a boiler 300ml which is more than twice the size of the Classic's and brass as opposed to aluminium.
    2 points
  17. This is what I have received today: - Eureka Mignon Silenzio - La Pavoni Europiccola ELH Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
    2 points
  18. I had the Mignon MK2 and was underwhelmed. At the time I was happy with it but only had awful grinders to compare it to, as soon as I switched to a big flat the flaws were obvious. Niche beats it even with lighter roasts. Don't get the Mignon and single dose it. If you're going down the route of bellows, tube hopper + weight you may as well get a big flat.
    1 point
  19. Gaggia Classic bodies are non magnetic between 2002-2008 afterwards they moved to cheaper thinner and magnetic tin alloy
    1 point
  20. I found it on the Seagate / Paragon site, downloaded and it is up and working. Just need to find how to print now, Ctr +P does not work. Many thanks for information.
    1 point
  21. Can't speak for the others but I have been extremely surprised by how good the JX pro is. It was supposed to be used just in the early morning but I have found it such a joy to use and the grind it produces is quite phenomenal that the mignon and the la pavoni Zip have not been required at all!
    1 point
  22. 2. Treat it like it's a race, especially at espresso settings. Momentum will be a big help especially with lighter roasts. 3. @MWJB probably has.
    1 point
  23. More things to make more coffee with. The £20 Acaia Pearl rip-off seems to work a treat. Automatic timer & all.
    1 point
  24. Haha, it still written as expresso when you try to get espresso in QLD
    1 point
  25. Bella Barista two year warranty is normally fully transferable, if that helps. Regards, John
    1 point
  26. Hi, I see i didn't take you long!
    1 point
  27. Just download a "NTFS for Mac" app.......... No that's it... literally just download a "NTFS for Mac" app...... I think it's even on the Seagate website.
    1 point
  28. This is what is in my purchase history, but you'll find lots of almost identical versions elsewhere and on Amazon. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Micro-Vacuum-Cleaner-Mini-USB-Attachment-Tool-Kit-Computer-Desk-Keyboard-Car/293596097323?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649 It's not particularly strong in terms of suction, and not very well built - as you would expect - but it does the job.
    1 point
  29. 😂 - as per my post, lockdown does funny things to you... 🤣
    1 point
  30. Currently letting it dry. I’ve just applied linseed oil. Amazing what lockdown does to you... me? treating wood? Never thought that day would come. [emoji23][emoji106] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  31. Only real drawback of the Niche as far as I can see is that it's fugly, IMHO. It looks like a cheap home appliance not a serious piece of kit. Some people prefer flat burrs also, especially for lighter roasts (Niche is conical burrs) It certainly seems like a very good option if that's your budget though.
    1 point
  32. So I have taken the top and bottom burrs off(the screws on the lower ones were really loose), cleaned , reassembled and recalibrated. It now seems to be producing really fine silky grinds that clog up the Shute and my Pavoni!. Maybe the loose screws were the problem but it seems to be sorted. I have enclosed some pics for anyone’s comments in case I am missing something obvious. To me the burr carrier looks O.K but I would appreciate any comments. Thanks for your help (as hotmetal commented, it’s amazing what you can find up Wimbledon Common!)
    1 point
  33. Niche is great by all accounts and if you single dose then worth consideration. If you just make espresso and you like the convenience of beans in the hopper then there are some less expensive alternatives like the Mignon Specialita or If you want to push the boat out then take a look at the Atom 60.
    1 point
  34. Ah yeah they look great, will grab a set of these i think, thank you
    1 point
  35. I totally understand @salty, I only make for myself as well. I like the way the hotplate stays on for 40 minutes, also I turn it off and back on again for another 40 minutes etc', depends what setting I use - full or half volume. No worries mate.
    1 point
  36. Roast level has no influence on the usefulness of a French press.
    1 point
  37. Only Austenitic Stainless steel is non magnetic. If Austenitic is mixed with Martensitic Stainless steel, it becomes magnetic Ferritic Stainless steel is also magnetic as there is Iron in the alloy mix. The magnetic properties of Stainless steels are dependent on the elements added to the alloy. Gaggia Classic cases are magnetic.
    1 point
  38. I have done a lot of experimentation with drinkware, there are a few things that make the difference for me (all IMO/YMMV/etc): 1.) A "thin lip" is an absolute must, the thinner the better especially for filter coffee where the thinner lip helps the coffee cool quicker too so you can investigate how the coffee tastes as it cools. These double walled glass ones are only a good idea for espresso which doesn't taste good if it gets too cold. 2.) If you like acidity look for a tall cup with a narrow diameter, if you prefer mouthfeel/body look for shorter squatter cups with large diameters 3.) Glass is awful, don't drink from it (but it does make the coffee look prettier) - porcelain or ceramic is the most widely used for a reason (and of course don't drink from metal/plastic) 4.) For filter cups forgo the handle so you can connect with the drink! 5.) You need to like the look on the table, if you think they're hideous (Kruve for me are incredibly ugly) then you'll never enjoy what you drink out of them
    1 point
  39. @Burnzy edit: if you're on topcashback there's £2 off £10 spend today which effectively takes it down to £15.99.
    1 point
  40. Using an IMS B70 2T H26.5 basket and dosing 19g.
    1 point
  41. I have never had a classic, but I have a v2 2007/8 silvia, Rust... yes, it has some, but we are talking tiny spots, for me at least, nothing that would cause structural issues. The grouphead cover is just the chrome paint getting knocked off the cover, I guess i must be careful when i put the portafilter in as I have never had that. Again its not a structural thing. Boiler wise, its a brass boiler compared to an aluminum boiler so I expect thats where the extra cost comes from, but it makes it more robust and you can put citric acid through it without issues for example. So, when people talk about build quality, of a silvia... I have never really understood it, i mean its a few ugly panels of metal that barely fit together screwed around a big chunk of brass with some wires. I don't think it was put together by some old italian artisan in a workshop in some tuscan mountains. You can only really talk about a few key components and as you said, the boiler is a bigger chunk of more expensive metal, and myabe a little easier to maintain, I think that's the main thing.
    1 point
  42. @Burnzy Will just put it through pour over - Chemex to be specific.
    1 point
  43. @Burnzy I brought these a little while ago and they're great: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Digital-Weight-scales-Drip-Coffee-Timer-LCD-Display-Kitchen-Food-Scale-0-1g-3kg/254516390704?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649 There's is a small lag but it's more than manageable. I think black cat also sells some for a similar price that several have brought.
    1 point
  44. I reckon the penis enlargement will definitely work though - she looks impressed
    1 point
  45. There isn’t any markers on there. So it’s not in bars. I’ve seen BEs that measure low and some that measure off the scale with the same shot timing. So basically it’s junk. That’s the reason it was ditched on the pro. Go on shot time and volume, and of course taste to alter your variables and ignore the gauge
    1 point
  46. https://www.seotraininglondon.org/can-you-trust-trustpilot/ Just get your refund and move on with your life...
    1 point
  47. He did state it fits a VST perfectly so it will fit all VST baskets perfect dude Sent from my 5033X_EEA using Tapatalk
    1 point
  48. @Pseudonym Of course, I was pulling your leg slightly....I have had several Sage DB's as when I needed what they have to offer, they tick the boxes. The Sage set up has flaws around no availability of spares and having to use Coffee Classics so I always bought mine when they were on offer and sold them with a decent chunk of warranty (before reverting to a proper machine.....LOL)
    1 point
  49. I use some little magnets and mostly it hides away, but sometimes for some beans it comes out to play.👍
    1 point
  50. I've been using a MaraX, or a prototype variant where I fed back to Lelit on the thermal management since May 2019. I test the water as it hits the coffee, not watch some electronic readout connected to a thermal probe in the HX. My stuff is real world and proved in videos (as I know you have seen). I don't just say it I try and show it. I would suggest you trust the review I wrote. If my review wasn't right, I think you would have heard shouts about it by now. It's also one of the best selling HX machines at the moment when retailers can get stock. The way it manages temperatures is a similar way as all double boiler E61 machines, in that it uses a calculation to decide what HX temperature equates to what group temperature. In MaraX it doesn't need to display an offset, so that calculation is hard coded into the machine. It will look at the water temperature in the loop and boost it as required (it can do some other things to but I won't mention them as it might give others some competitive advantage). If the environment where the machine is placed it will give more heat...if it's warmet it uses less. Again no magic, just a function of physics. The reason the temperature can vary and I give it in ballpark ranges is simply because as you pull a shot the system starts dynamically changing and reaches a different equilibrium, hence the first second shot variance. The great thing is most people won't have a problem with that and it's way better than a standard HX. If people want very precise temperature control, then they need to move to Minima, Bianca, Elizabeth, ECM etc.. dual boiler machines. So you don't need to know the temperature, just cool, medium and hot, then use the table I gave to understand how you affect that. If 1 is not to your taste try II, or III, especially with a very light roasted coffee you can try bumping it up. I am testing some new stuff I asked for, which may come out in 2021, if it works which it might not (or I will be when I get round to it, I'm finishing off the Elizabeth work). When I said I really meant it....sometimes it's just nice to walk up and pull a shot...brain not engaged
    1 point
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