Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 19/09/21 in all areas

  1. I've wanted to do this for a while and finally got around to wrapping the Classic this week, I've thought about having it powder coated before but didn't think it was worth the cost, wrapping it is surprisingly cheap, probably cost me about £25 in the end plus my time to do it. I was toying with white but ended up going with matt black and I think it came out pretty well! You definitely can't tell it's wrapped unless you look super close for seams or underneath. Wrapped the PID box to match too. The only thing is it's going to show dust now a lot! If anyone is interested about how I did it, what I used etc feel free to ask questions and I'll try to explain.
    14 points
  2. After a 5-month kitchen refurb (should've been 6 weeks, but between the global materials shortage and the builders getting covid, it all dragged on a bit...), I finally have a dedicated coffee nook! Looking forward to getting back into V60s as well as experimenting more with espressos (both been in storage during the refurb). Pending tasks: fix the LED lights at the top, and 3d-print some portafilter holders.
    10 points
  3. Hi guys, Brad here from the Philippines. Very happy to meet you all! After 11 days of being stuck in Philippines customs, they finally released the Evo Leva today and its probably the highlight of the year 🤣 From arriving with some nice footprints, the wooden pallet box was super solid and everything was safe and sound inside. The biggest reason why I got the Evo Leva is because of my Bentwood grinder. When I first got the Bentwood abroad, I tasted it on both the VA Athena and the Bosco Sorrento. Best espressos of my life. When I brought the grinder back with me to the Philippines, I just couldn't get near what I had tasted before on a big lever. I can say that of the only 4 shots I pulled today (because it was already 6pm), I definitely taste that magic again. Immediately I'm getting deeper depth of flavor in the cup and lingering aftertaste that my previous machine just couldn't pull out. On a technical side, I was incredibly surprised at how easy it was to pull on the lever compared to the Athena and the Bosco, is there some sort of mechanical design on the Evo Leva that assists in the amount of force needed? And the steaming power I found was somewhere in between the overpowered Bosco and the more subtle Athena. Very impressive quality of foam and really easy to get some good texture. Extremely excited to start pulling some straight light roast espresso tomorrow and very glad to be part of this community!
    9 points
  4. Afternoon, I’ve been gradually evolving my coffee setup over the years, starting with a Jura bean-to-cup, moving on to a Francino Heavenly and then two Sage Dual Boilers. Last year I took the plunge with an ACS Vesuvius. I have been through various grinders including a Macap and a modded Mazzer Royal, and have been with the Ceado e37s for the past five years. Today, I received the Niche and looking forward to seeing what it can do. I am hoping the ease of switching beans with the Niche will push me on to explore a wider selection of beans.
    9 points
  5. ... and another Evo has landed ! I just received and unpacked Evo #025. It's my first proper espresso machine as I've been using (and maintaining) full auto machines up until then (ignoring a Krups "espresso looking machine" with a thermocoil). I don't feel qualified to comment seriously on the finer details of espresso preparation but here are some initial observations by a layman... My machine arrived with only one wooden leg left on its box courtesy of DHL, but the box protected the content well and all is fine and dandy (including the extra Vostok wands and the 3 white panels which I added to my order of a standard shiny box with Vesuvius wands). Unpacking and setting up was straightforward thanks to the clear instructions from the manual which DaveC wrote (there are no instructions in the box itself). Don't expect 'Apple' like packaging and finish (there are a few hidden sharp edges and some components like the water tank are a bit generic), but the machine feels well build. It is relatively heavy but I was more surprised by how big it feels. While waiting for the machine to be delivered, fill a few large jugs of water as the initial flushing will require way more water than what an Osmio Zero can store! The accessories are packaged in cardboard rather than in a wooden tray, which is just as efficient and I'd rather not pay for something which will go straight to my attic! The scope of delivery has been mostly documented by others (3 portafilters with wooden handles, two steam tips, a full group maintenance kit, etc.), I was surprised to get 2 large sized baskets (they seem identical) rather than just one and 3 spare shower screens (they each look a bit different, but it may be due to manufacturing variations), in addition the scope of delivery included two spare steel circlips, 4 allen screws (presumably for the LSM group), various gaskets and a few parts which I haven't identified yet. It is certainly nice to have everything to get started (besides ground coffee!) in the kit, with a working tamper, a towel(!) and a group brush. There is some slight rattle at the junction between the drip tray and the body of the machine, and with the two steel mesh grids, but nothing dramatic and which silicon pads won't solve (metal on metal contact requires very tight tolerances). I got a bit confused by the 3 silicon hoses which are loose in the water tank as I was only expecting two (per the instructions), and as the moldings at the bottom of the plastic tank seem to be of no use on this machine... but putting the hose with a sensor and the one with a filter as low as practical in the tank seemed logical and yielded good results. Handling the double spring lever is not that hard, but it clearly deserves to be treated with some respect and a bit of 'training' is required as it can catch people by surprise (make sure the handles are properly screwed by the way!) So far, I've only made one test shot using my fairly new Niche and some Lidl coffee (I promise I'll do better, but to season the grinder and with my full auto machines these beans give some quite respectable results)... Maybe it's beginner's luck, but it went very smoothly (pre-infusion lasted around 5 seconds, and the machine produced a 2:1 double espresso with good crema some 25-30 seconds later). No gushing or issues with the naked portafilter either. Using the default temperatures, the coffee tasted a bit more acidic than what my automatic Gaggia Titanium produces, but it was perfectly acceptable. I did try steaming milk too, and this was the biggest surprise... there is a world of difference between a single hole tip thermocoil and the Evo leva at its defaut 130C and a three hole tip... This feels like a real game changer (and it eliminates any excuses I had for variable texture!) - As I'm also curious, I played with the various menus, and noticed that the temperature unit setting has moved to the system menu (It is right after the "GpNum" setting, under the "UoM" heading, with the option to choose between 'C' and 'F'), at least in firmware version 02.06)... I'm curious what the 'lightbulb' setting does in the settings menu, where the C/F setting used to be... By the way, all my PIDB settings were the same (2.0,0,5,5 respectively), but these seem to give good temperature stability based on my initial checks... all good! As to body flex and pump noise, frankly I feel these are non-issues in practice (yes, there is some flex if one looks at videos, but it's hardly noticeable in use... any steel box flexes under stress and I'll always remember visiting a factory where supposedly tough trucks were made and where it jumped at you until the truck cabins came out of the paint booth ;-). The pump noise isn't super pleasant, but it's not very loud and doesn't last long. Clearly I'm at the very beginning of a steep learning curve, but, between the resources of this forum, the Evo Leva and my Niche, I could hardly be in better starting blocks. This is a really exciting machine, and the only one which ticked all my requirements. Thank you DaveC and Paolo Cortese for making it a reality as it is a very unique proposition in the market.
    9 points
  6. Since more people will receive this more and more it would be good to say something about the temp range, so you have a easier start with: - if you drink dark roasts (blends, oilly beans, 2nd crack beans) boost the temp high, a starting point would be 98-100C brew boiler and 90/92C group (keep a 8C off-set between them) - if you drink medium, full city, espresso roasts but not high acidity stuff, decrease the temp 2-3C from the above 96/88 or 98/90C -for light stuff, nordic roasts, cinnamon, filter roasts (underdeveloped beans) used as espresso the sweet spot is a bit narrow and it depends more on water composition, grinder (burrs) and how much extraction you get from the grinder. I would start with 94 for the brew boiler and 86C for the grouphead, and from those values only downwards. Some other users with different machines confirmed that on some dark roasts they preferred a much higher brewing temp (94C water temp) on a Decent or a Bianca/ECM e61. For light roasts they do use a lower temp. So this is against the theory that the darker the roasts the lower the temp, I do not know why yet. Darker roasts are lacking a lot of acidity, so the increase in temperature is not boosting the acidity over the top like on a light roast. The light roasts at a much higher temp, becomes harsh, high acidity, all the floral and delicate notes are dead. Decent users are pulling for more than 12 months now at 88-87C light roasted coffee with a drop (we are speaking of filter coffee from Manhattan, Friedhats, Nomad, Sei, Facsimile, Tim Wendelboe) 88-87C on a Decent (slurry puck temp) is closer to a 90-91C on a normal machine. I believe a 94/86 C temp on the Evo is close to something like that, but I can't prove anything and I go by taste.
    8 points
  7. Just a little patient this are some of the forum machines ready to pick up, we have shipped 2 machines and are hold in Milan we are just waiting that everything is ok to avoid problem with storage somewhere else.
    7 points
  8. Had a fantastic week-end social on both days with our close friends and families at our home. Some of them are aware of the new toy in our kitchen. A good friend of mine brought a bag of coffee, which was a very nice thought indeed. I did not realise the family is going to bring some coffee. We would have defo advised them otherwise. Any way, the bag in question was a nice ground coffee from one of the good stores. We appreciated the gesture and told the family not to open the bag as it won’t work on this machine. They insisted on using the fresh bag (let’s not worry about the date on the bag), while we were gently dismissing the idea. Long story shot, they won. I pulled out the double pressurised basket, filled the basket with 20g of the French roast, prepared the puck as I would normally and cocked the lever. I kept 92/100 for one shot, steadily reducing the temp by 0.5C - 1C for the next few tamping even harder, and so on. The results were as I had expected. No sooner, I cocked the lever, the black stuff just poured like an open tap. 🤣 Obviously, neither I could drink nor the family, which brought the bag. The reaction was even funnier. Their £100 machine makes a better coffee. 😂 Obviously, the Evo had the last laugh and she had put up impressive shows over the week end. I dropped the shower screen this am. It’s pretty clean though, although I gave a quick wash. The tweaked PID coffee parameters meant she was very temp stable between back to shots. We pulled 30 shots on Sat evening and 20 on Sun evening excluding our daily coffee routine. We used the Ethiopian Worka Wuri, Kenya and Funka 21. Some drank as black Americano, espressos and a very few with milk. We were initially concerned about hand grinding challenges, but we had a lot help in the department. This wasn’t a problem any more. The cup was a stunner for all of them. They felt they never drank anything like this before. Some wondered why their machines can’t. The unanimous feedback was they are neither going to like what they will drink at home nor at the coffee shops. She has already set some houses on fire, while others are looking forward to having another cuppa soon. All in all, the Evo has become an overnight sensation in our circle. 😊 Many thanks to Dave and Paolo of ACS for putting out a splendid machine. 🙏 Thanks and have a great week every one!
    6 points
  9. Having had to sell my decent and niche a while back I started looking at espresso machine. I had consider sage barista pro but figured for the same money I could refurb and mod an old Classic and pick up a eureka mignon manuale. The classic is finally done and ready to play with!
    6 points
  10. Evo had it’s first run out at the Market this weekend, over 300 coffees just on Sunday (between 2 machines). Worked a treat and very temp stable. Shots have great body and by using the gauge to pull the shot very consistent output. Means no scales ruined by always being wet. One thing I did change. Lifting the Evo from the floor to the counter at felt ok. Moving it 30m to the car and manoeuvring it was almost impossible. The weight in the back of the machine is 8kg which makes it very back heavy when carrying. It can be simply unscrewed so for Sunday ran it without the weight. No semblance of trying to tip so whilst it is belt and braces to include it I’m not sure it is needed so will continue without it. One small thing I noticed that I hadn’t before was the clock on the display. There is one - but only when the machine is off! Once turned on it not there which is when I would look at it! Overall a great performance and incredibly consistent. Uses a coarser grind which helps with the flavours. No buyers regret on this one 😀
    6 points
  11. End user Upgrade/modification 😁 Removal of Capacitor 4 Severity and Impact Immense irritation for me cos Gicar fecked up, possibly an occasional tiny noise for you...impact other than that = zero Affected Machines Any Evo already shipped, that makes a noise pulsing the pump...not all will. Evos shipping from the factory from Today have been modified already Background (slight tech warning) Just a little update to owners....as you know I have a slightly different machine, the Alpha test bed, and it's not laid out the same as yours. It also had a problem with a "pump heartbeat" every 1.7s. In mine, I have to remove capacitor C4 on the main board. It was reported to Gicar for the Evo boards, mine was a reflashed Vostok board, and they "fixed it"...your firmware is a bit different to mine. Only they didn't fix it completely unless Capacitor 4 was still removed....they just didn't tell anyone that. The factory didn't pick up on this because the noise level is such, it cannot be heard in the factory. C4 is used for the optional 230V Vostok external pump, when left on the board it forms a timing circuit as it charges and discharges, which fires one of the SSRs controlling the pump. Symptom You "might" hear your pump pulsing every 3-4 seconds, it's very quiet, though. If you do, and want to stop it because it's irritating (it won't actually cause any damage), follow the procedure below. If you can't hear a thing....don't bother, especially as it won't damage anything....you will simply get a tiny flux in the pump winding occasionally. The fix (estimated time 10m, difficulty = easy, tools required = minimal). remove the right hand side panel and underneath in the electronics bay is the main board, remove the cover. The offending capacitor at C4 is identified with the arrow Grab some long nosed pliers You're all set. Now, Paolo isn't a patient or gentle man, and he was holding a video camera. I recommend you support the board/case with one hand and give more and gentler/smaller wiggles....it will still fall off. Grip the capacitor about halfway deep, this way you don't risk any damage to the board. The whole process takes about 10 min and @Stevebee has already done his if you need any reassurance. Obviously, unplug the machine before doing this. c4 tooth removal.mp4 Have fun!
    6 points
  12. Best espresso I’ve made this morning thanks for the advice @DavecUK
    6 points
  13. Yesterday I mostly been baking
    5 points
  14. Capadectomy operation successful. Patient healthy. Patient now has no heartbeat...
    5 points
  15. So had to wiggle the water tank to get it to start sucking. Gear pump much quieter than expected. need to get an adaptor to fit the mains plumbing (duetto was 3/8, think Evo is maybe 1/2 - any confirmation would be good from anyone who knows for certain). Panicky first lever pull. Steam very good compared to my duetto as a first impression. Wobbly bit of latte. Tasted very good! To be totally truthful - absolutely knackered so real testing starts tomorrow.
    5 points
  16. Hey everyone Have had the Gaggia Classic 2011 Model for a year now. Just completed the PID installation last week and my Niche Zero arrived a few days ago! Prior to the Niche I was using a Feld Hand grinder purchased from this forum! Which did me great but needed to move to an electric variant!! Over the moon with my setup still learning all the time but love the process. Setup: Gaggia Classic 2011 Model (PID, Rancilio steam wand) VST 18g Ridgeless Basket Spouted and a Bottomless Portafilter Niche Zero June 2021 Model Timemore Black Mirror + Scale Coffeevac Container
    5 points
  17. Another Evo has landed, this one in Oz. Took 12 days to get here, but in reality, the tracking showed it was within 40km of my home for 5 days before it eventually turned up. No legs on the pallet, but the box itself in good condition, and the machine is unmarked. All set up, but first espresso will have to wait for the morning. In the meantime, a couple of questions: The instructions say to make sure the portafilter is locked on so that the handle is in line with the machine. There's no way I can get near that - the photo below shows it about as far is it wants to go on. Makes me nervous that I'll have a portafilter flying around. Is this representative of what other people are seeing? I've left it on for an hour or so to get the group nice and hot, but it doesn't really want to go on any further. The brew boiler in particular wanders 2 or more degrees above and below the set point. Are other people seeing this, and have you fiddled with the PID settings to try and make it a bit more stable? Thanks for your help.
    5 points
  18. Welcome @Eiffel! You will love the Evo! The "lightbulb" setting you see is a transplant from the Vostok where it toggles the LED lights. There are no lights on the Evo but the setting stayed and is not active. @Paolo_Cortesedid not answer my question when I inquired if LEDs would be in the Evo's future - but I think the tongue-in-cheek question was rather "Lost in Translation". Frankly the Evo learning curve is not as steep as I thought because I kept all the variables in a straight line and tackled only one at a time. Test, repeat, then document success or failure before moving on. It is tempting but the Evo will reward a disciplined approach. Congrats once again and get ready for a ride you will not soon forget!
    5 points
  19. @Stevebee Once you get it set up, then it's a matter of simply being happy with the preinfusion pressure...as I don't find it that critical most people seem happy with anything from 1.7 to 2.5 bar. You won't change it after that. You will get to know the temps you like for different coffees and realise it only takes a minute or so for the group to achieve the change in temp (because it's not thermosyphon controlled), most of the time you won't need to change brew temp. Then the machine should just blend away into the background....you will even forget that once you needed scales for every shot...not just when dialling in a new coffee....the 15 minute warmup will seem completely normal and the great shots exactly as expected.
    5 points
  20. In the image below, we see the evolution of the motor car, the next photo would obviously be of the electric car. With each generation, the car improved, technically, build quality, reliability and performance. When I was young my dad used to say, "they don't make them like they used to" (he was a motor mechanic), then the Japanese pushed the market and along came the modern car with the demise of the old British marques. My dad still used to say, "they don't make them like they used to", but added "thank god" The espresso machine is no different. We now have electronic temperature control not pressurestats, twin boilers, PIDs. All of which make the machines easier to use and more capable of not only repeatable results, but tunable results to match the coffees being roasted and the capabilities of grinders now available to the prosumer market. I saw a comment earlier that the Londinium is old tech, in many ways there's nothing wrong with that, I like the E61 group, that's old tech, I like the Evo group that's old tech. What I really like is when the best of the old tech is married to the best of new tech.. In a sense, the Londinium is technological laziness, which (at the price) is an insult to the consumer. Just recently the innovation of a thermistor, instead of a noisy old pressurestat was introduced. Perhaps one day they will use an insulated steel boiler, ventilate the case, fit a proper cup rack...you know, the little things. The group Londinium use limits what they can do technologically, but it is much cheaper for the factory (Fracino) to buy. I will admit not being a fan of the Fiorenzato type group, simply because of the way it works and the quality of what it is. I always liked the LSM group type though, from the first time I used on a Pompeii. I'm also not pushing the Evo in particular, people have to buy what's right for them. it's important though to really understand what it is you're getting. Machines like the ECM, Bianca, MaraX, Minima, Vesuvius PP, etc. are all attempting to marry the best of old school with modern tech. Some manufacturers rested on their laurels, took the easy route, and faded into relative obscurity. My technical and design view experience of espresso machines means I fully understand the technologies, strengths and weaknesses in a way the consumer can't. This gives me quite a different view on certain machines. Next week I get a top of the range Vibiemme to have a look at and review. It's interesting because they are an owner company, not corporate and I like working with companies like that. I'm curious to see where they are now, because they lost their way a decade or so ago along with quite a few other companies. From what I hear though...they may be back...we shall see.
    5 points
  21. My only nickname of note was 'Dylan'. Not after the singer but the stoned rabbit in the Magic Roundabout...
    4 points
  22. the other machines probably have pressurised baskets and sneaky devices to produce fake crema though, and so are much less dependant on variables like quality and age of beans, grind size and consistency etc. the pressure in the basket is created by the basket itself, which usually has a single small hole in the bottom. you could crumble an oxo cube in it and it would produce a drink with crema. with the classic (assuming it’s an unpressurised basket), it’s the puck that creates the pressure during the extraction so those variables become critical. not enough resistance (grind too course) and the water gushes through, too much (grind too fine) and you choke it and nothing comes out. or you get channeling. and the age and quality of the beans becomes a much bigger factor. edited to add: and with this, preparation of your puck becomes much more important (distribution, tamping, making sure it’s level etc.)
    4 points
  23. Dallacorte, La Spaziale and others have all eschewed the 58mm size....with good reason. During testing various machines over the years I noticed that the 53/54 mm sized groups all produced excellent shots with far less failed shots. The slightly deeper puck for weight does seem to make a positive difference. As @The Systemic Kid has said, just because something becomes ubiquitous doesn't mean it's better.
    4 points
  24. A couple of people were interested in more info so I've written a sort of guide on how I did it. Hopefully it's useful and coherent! Tools / Materials Vinyl wrap, there’s lots of different brands/types of wrap available and you should look in to them to decide what’s best for you and your budget, consider ease of use, colours/finishes available, availability in small quantities, cost etc. As far as I read in my research Avery Dennison and 3M seem to be the best and the easiest to work with but are pricey, I ended up going with a brand called KPMF and used their air release wrap which incorportates air channels and is designed to let you smooth out any air bubbles easily. This is still a well regarded premium wrap but not as expensive as 3M and Avery, plus it was easier to source in a small quantity, I got it here and it cost about £21 for 1m x 1.54m delivered : https://www.mdpsupplies.co.uk/vehicle-wrapping/matt-wrapping-film - Cheap wraps are probably best avoided as they’ll be difficult to work with and give poor results/longevity. A felt edged squeegee for vinyl wrap, loads on eBay and amazon for a few quid, or here https://www.mdpsupplies.co.uk/sign-tools-accessories/squeegees Decent scalpel or craft knife Cutting board Metal ruler Tape measure Hairdryer or heat gun Isopropyl alcohol Prep & Planning I’d advise doing some reading on vinyl wrap if you don’t know much about it and having a look on youtube for some videos/guides on wrapping cars and you’ll get an idea of the basics, how wrap applies to things and some dos and don’ts. CK wraps is a popular channel. There will be an application guide from your wrap manufacturer as well which is worth a read, KPMF have one for air release which you can find on google. They also have a youtube video. You should plan what parts you want to wrap and how many pieces of wrap you want to do it in. More pieces means less pulling the wrap around corners which is easier, but it means you’ll have seams which won’t give you as a clean a look, unless they’re on straight edges then you probably won’t notice them. The parts I did mine in were : Front of the main body, from the back recess all the way round to the opposite back recess Back panel Top plate Inside left Inside right Inside bottom PID front/back/top/bottom Measure out all the parts you plan to wrap separately allowing enough extra to pull the wrap over edges, under the bottom etc and some extra for when you inevitably don’t get the wrap straight pulling it round the body. I allowed 5cm on each side for the main body. I used the website https://www.cutlistoptimizer.com/ to plan how I’d cut the wrap and with a 1m x 1.54m piece you’ll be able to have three attempts at the main body if you need it (the hardest/biggest part) while still having plenty for the other pieces. To get the machine ready I removed the top and separated the filling funnel and the chrome cup plate (held together with two screws) as I wanted to wrap that plate too. Remove the drip tray, water reservoir, switch bank (number the connectors!) and steam knob. You’ll need to take the Gaggia badge off the front which is attached with three pins through holes in the body, you’ll see them looking down inside the front of the machine, you just bend the pins straight with a screwdriver or similar and it pulls off. Pull the water pipes up in to the machine. Aside from that you could remove the steam valve if you want, it would make it a bit easier but I didn’t and it was fine as you’ll just make a cut in the wrap as you get to that part to allow the spindle through. If you have a PID you’ll need to remove it to wrap the back panel, for everything else you can remove it or just secure it inside the machine. You’ll need to clean the body with isopropyl alcohol so there are no oils or residues causing issues for the wraps adhesive. Wrapping I did it over a few days, starting with the easier parts to get an idea of how to work with the wrap as this was my first time wrapping anything. I started with the top plate and the PID (although the PID isn’t that easy). Next I did the back, then the main body and lastly the insides. You will need time and patience! The top plate is easy, you can just lay the wrap out, peel off the backing and pretty much place the plate over it, use the squeegee to smooth it out, don’t press too hard or it closes the air channels in the wrap for removing air bubbles, fold the wrap on the under side of the plate so the edges are covered and you’ll need to make some relief cuts on the corners so it folds underneath without creases on the edges. Then once you’re happy you can heat the wrap with a hairdryer/heat gun and this activates the adhesive, you’ll need to squeegee again as you do this as sometimes air bubbles appear at this point. Wrap can be repositioned and applied as you go which you’ll need to do, the creases should squeegee out from doing that unless it gets really folded or screwed up. You’ll need to make relief cuts as you go to keep the wrap straight and applying properly. The main body is the hardest part, I took two goes at it, the first time, I found because it’s a large piece of wrap it was sticking to itself, other parts of the machine and my desk, it ended up getting very creased where I had to keep unsticking it so I started again. The second time I only peeled half the backing off and got the first half done before peeling off the rest and wrapping the second half. This worked well and I’d highly recommend doing this. For the main body you’ll start at the back recess and work your way round, if you’re not removing the steam valve then start on the side without the steam valve. Go slow and do bit by bit, use the squeegee lightly as you go and keep pulling it round and applying until you have no air bubbles in each part, I found that pulling the wrap outwards a little but not completely tight and squeegeeing as I applied it gave the best results. This might not be the best technique, I’m not sure, but it worked for me. When you reach the middle you’ll need to make some cuts for the inside of the machine so the wrap can be pulled round straight. You can make a cut inside the switchbank hole to fold it in there, and when you reach the steam valve spindle you’ll need to make a cut to let that through and still apply the wrap around the hole. For holes like on the back and where the steam knob is, I used a scalpel knife and cut them out once the wrap was applied but before heating the wrap. With edges you can fold the wrap over/under as best as you can making relief cuts in hidden places if needed, where straight edges meet another part to be wrapped, for example the edge between the left outside of the body and the left inside of the body, you can fold over the wrap from the outside of the body to the inside say 2 cm which gives you a covered edge, you can then tidy the line on the inside but cutting excess off with a knife/metal rule, and then wrap the inside with a separate piece up to the edge but not folding the wrap over to the outside this time, so you will end up with a seam at the top of the inside, but it’s not noticeable as it’s on an edge and the inside. Alternatively you can cut the wrap along the edge and have the edges silver. I did this on the bottom because I quite liked the silver edges, plus it’s easier. I actually did it on the top too but then changed my mind and applied a thin edge piece which worked quite well, not as clean as folded over edges would have been though. With recesses and raised parts on the inside/back you can use the squeegee to make the wrap sit smooth in to the recess and start laying the wrap at these points so you’re not trying to stretch the wrap in to the recess if that makes sense, it’s actually pretty easy wrapping these parts of the machine as they’re flat and relatively small. You can cut the excess along the edges with a knife once it’s applied. Once you’ve wrapped it and heated the wrap to activate the adhesive, you can tidy the fold under/over lines with a knife if you want to, then you’ll need to put the badge back on, I used the pins of the badge to mark the wrap by poking it from the inside and then just pressed the pins through from the outside and bent them back to secure it. Then reassemble, wipe it down and you’re done. I’m sure I’ve forgotten things but if you plan properly, do some research and go slow you’ll work it out as you go. Any questions post them here and I’ll try to answer.
    4 points
  25. 18.5 to 40g out in 23-30 sec range Puck prep, bplus, bravo tamper on top set to max. 180-200 microns on Bentwood (that's peak distribution size too according to their laser analysis on grinds) EY% in the 22-24% range depends on beans.
    4 points
  26. be worth a pm asking the special conditions for import
    4 points
  27. Time Left: 11 days and 14 hours

    • Commercial Adverts
    • NEW

    For a limited time we are going to offer a Vesuvius at bargain price. Due of Covid worst time ever we are thinking to sell some unit at lowest price in order to play with an unique machine at the same price as a simple dual boiler. The machines will be shipped after 3 weeks from the order or less if it's possible. Colored option on request. 24 months warranty and special conditions for import 1990GBP shipping included more details on request. Feel free to ask any question. Paolo

    NO VALUE SPECIFIED

    4 points
  28. Every Saturday, 8:30-14:00. Only just got the Evo so going to need some time with it first, but out the box didn’t take long to produce some great shots. Once you get your grind and prep right, it’s very consistent
    4 points
  29. Did a few preliminary tests between the Evo and Vesuvius, trying to match the profiles / shot time and output. Put 20g in an IMS 32 basket, target 44g out. Dialled to take 40 seconds. I suspected that the deeper bed depth would play a significant part and it turned out that way. Initially, replicated the timing and pressure shown on the gauge on the V program. This ran way too fast. Had to reduce the pressure at each of the steps to get close to 44g in 40 secs. Will try this on the Decent as I believe it will be the same i.e lower pressure profile to get the same ratio / timings as its also 58mm on the Decent. When I have put the same pressure profile on the V as the Decent, they ran almost the same. Flavour profile is excellent on the Evo with great body. This is with a medium, q10 days post roast. As an aside, was seeing the overshoot on the brew boiler that some have experienced previously. Changed the B value to 50 and it has solved this issue. I think the B number is not a straight temp translation but all I know is the changed made the machine act as I expected so happy now 😀
    4 points
  30. There is this belief that higher pressure means less clarity. From what? I have plenty experience when it comes to all sorts of strange shots, both from my modded machines with ito/leva and with decent espresso. I did pull 3 bar flat shots, turbo 6 bar bloom or dynamic bloom shots and so on. A higher brewing pressure demands for a finer grind. A finer grind if properly extracted and not chocked and channeled can extract higher. Did you see there are some guys here including me that drink extremely light roasts on Leva and we all said that the sourness is not present? you do know why? because it's extracts a lot more than a 7 bar machine. So no, higher 10.5 bar peak pressure shots are not less clean, or have less clarity, they are sweeter and have more extraction with better and riper fruits. You will only understand that when you are going to try it on your own.
    4 points
  31. A couple of points as the retailer of the Hobby - build is excellent, I have never seen a sharp edge on all the many units I have bench tested. If you look hard enough you will find a bad review for any product you care to mention. Consensus is much more useful when looking for a machine in my opinion. That said though, if you already have a Sage machine the likes of the Hobby, Classic, Pippa etc are going to be more of a sideways move than a big upgrade. Build and reliability will be better but ultimately I think you would end up a touch deflated. My advice would be save some more and pick up an Hx machine or dual boiler or keep your eye out in the classifieds for something. Aware I could well be talking us out of a sale but I like to be honest 👍 David
    4 points
  32. I was wondering whether there was much interest in the LCF. There has often been a lively Forum discussion about it but personally I think it's unmissable. I have just got home. I was glad that I got there early this morning with a chance to get my bearings before it got really busy, which it did. Some highlights, Dave Stanton and Jack from Crankhouse, just doing a two hour session on the 'Brewed by Hand' stand, which is on the ground floor, G 25. It would be worth visiting the stand in any event because they have rotating guest roasters there. I had an enthusiastic conversation with Hayden from Quarter Horse. They had a lovely Indian coffee (Mooleh Manay, a selective natural, sold out on their web site. I would have bought a bag or two but their card reader is out of action until tomorrow. They were in the roaster zone section on the first floor along with Origin, North Star and Bailies - R51, 52, 53 and 54 by the Coffee Art Project. I had variously an espresso and filters and filter from the four, Bailies had three different beans. I enjoyed them all (as well as the Pacamara that Dave had). The Indonesian stand had some interesting coffee on it. I recently had an Indonesian Pegasing, via the Dog & Hat sub, a natural roasted by Gold Box (Quarter Horse had a washed version earlier in the year). I would have bought beans from Quarter Horse - but stocked up with Crankhouse, Bailies and the Caravan/Project Waterfall collaboration (Ethiopian Desalech Mussie). The other concentration of roasters worth visiting was on the second floor, and it includes Girls Who Grind. I tried to find but didn't, Neighbourhood Coffee - supposed to be on the second floor. You get a map when you go in. If you have a KeepCup (or equivalent), take it with you and inside the map there is room for three stamps from various roasters including Quarter Horse, Origin and North Star. The participating roasters will stamp it if you use your reusable cup, then at the KeepCup stand they will enter you into a draw for a trip to Florence. As ever, there were plenty of other things and interesting conversations along the way even though Hayden said they had reduced exhibitors by a third. Once it got busy, though, it seemed as crowded as ever and not a whole lot of social distancing, which would have been a challenge. I left after four hours - completely caffeinated - I wish that I had taken a bottle of water. I am very glad that I went.
    4 points
  33. Upgraded my espresso machine and grinder setup at the start of the year and have been adding little bits and pieces over the year. Crem One Dual Boiler Eurkea Specialita for espresso & Sage Smart Grinder Pro for everything else Stag EKG Gooseneck kettle Timemore Black Mirror Scales Not Neutral Linos Latte & Flat White Size Kruve Propel espresso glasses Various pouovers, V60, Aeropress, Phins, theres a chemex hiding outside the picture I want to say I'm going to keep this setup for years but upgraditis is a horrible thing lol!!
    4 points
  34. Replaced a neglected fish tank and rehomed my coffee machine & grinder. Much better than it crammed in the corner of the kitchen! ECM mechanika iv Eureka zenith 65e The force tamper Felicita arc scales
    3 points
  35. Time is one of the least informative things when it comes to consistency. Focus more on grind setting & its effect on taste. E.g. if you change grind constantly to hit a specific time, your coffee will be less consistent than a constant grind setting with some variation in time. Let us know how you get on.
    3 points
  36. But that’s because the grinder body is designed as such, not because of the burrs. Let’s not forget, for instance, the Niche is an all-rounder. Yet, it uses Mazzer Kony burrs. So, tagging along your quote, I also never heard of anyone changing the grind on a Mazzer Kony from espresso to brew and back. Doesn’t mean that they can’t - it’s just impractical.
    3 points
  37. Colombian Cafe Granja Tres Dragones - blueberry on steroids.
    3 points
  38. Right, just finished my breakfast cuppa! i dropped the dose to 16 gms, Java Jampit. Left the grind where it was. It took more care to tamp and I had to work a little bit to sort out a fissure. The pre infusion was nly 3 to 4 seconds (depending if you count from when the gear pump kicks in or stops.....I counted from when the pump stopped. The pour was nice. Slightly faster but when I time it next time I reckon it will be spot on where I was perhaps slightly slow before. the taste for me, was a lot smoother......have tightened the grind up a tad so am looking forward to the next cuppa and receiving a smaller basket. I cannot describe taste beyond the drink had more flavour!
    3 points
  39. Finally dusted off my Ooni Pro after it has sat in the shed for 6 months post house move. cajun chicken pizza. Not the prettiest one I’ve ever done but darned tasty!
    3 points
  40. I think the issue is it’s good at making micro adjustments for dialling in a bean. But if swapping between beans or brew method, which is often a usp of single dose grinders and low retention ones, and needing to adjust grind size, that type of dial is awkward to make large changes with. Or regular changes and getting back to the exact previous setting
    3 points
  41. `There is no magic for formal to selling beans for £11 kg other than 1- selling good quality at a loss 2- buying cheap greens and trying to make out its artisan roasted blah blah lol 3- being so huge you can leverage prices given the description of the coffees on the website i doubt its 1 . And companies just don’t survive 3 years doing this . It’s not 3 , ive seen big buyers like has bean and they cant leverage coffee to £11 a kilo that a decent grade this doesn’t mean you wont enjoy it , but when you are looking for prices of this v more reputable roasters the difference is s result of the coffee being sourced and used.
    3 points
  42. Well finally decided on the Lelit Victoria. Single boiler is enough for just myself. Ordered from Bella and thought it was sent without a UK plug, but it was buried amongst the polystyrene packaging as was a nice bag of beans. Waiting for a tamp to arrive, so making do with the crappy plastic thing that came with the machine and struggling to get consistant results, so blaming that for now!
    3 points
  43. i got a notification email from dhl. Its just/finally left Milan, so i am assuming ill get a vat payment request shortly.
    3 points
  44. Hi Gaggiamaniacs! My Gaggia with the mods are now fully functional!! PID + CRONOMETER + PRESSURE GAUGE in a Naked Gaggia 😅
    3 points
  45. The Evo has landed. Now got to inspect if any damage, but outside looks perfect, then get it set up. Have a Vesuvius so familiar with some aspects of it.
    3 points
  46. @pj.walczak The most important thing is you are very happy with your setup and the shots it's making. It's a good way to be, as it saves you from upgraditis.
    3 points
  47. There is no way you can pull a dark roast (Passalacqua Harlem) or a nordic filter roast (example Tim Wendelboe) at the same temperature parameters. So it is mandatory to have a consistent repeatable temp control on a machine. Also is is moronic to have a steam boiler in direct connection to a brew boiler, since if you need lower temp you will lower your steam boiler pressure, having a less powerful steam. You must learn to control the steaming if you are going to jump from a 1.1 bar steam boiler to a 1.4 bar. So the Evo Leva is just a respond to modern times and needs, where some people pull light stuff, while others pull dark southern italian blends. A simple example is this, here is a light filter roast vs a dark south Italy roast, there is no way in hell you are going to pull them the same, you need a different ratio, a different temp.
    3 points
  48. 3 points
  49. 1. It's a bit of a PITA, you have to have an in line water treatment cartridge, limited where you site it and if you want to move it later, or sell it on...it's more difficult. I have seen photos of a Compressa plumbed in, and it looks a bit of a dogs dinner as it seemed to be sited in a very inconvenient place. The Compressa is the cheapest of the current Londinium range 2. No, the Compact, now called the Vectis, is trying to make a grab for the Cremina SL market. Apparently (according to the owner of the company), it's going to be more temperature stable than the Cremina and has a "gem of a 58mm lever group", according to the information that's being drip fed to the market from the closed private forum. I think it's worth taking the statements with a pinch of salt, as it has not actually been built yet, nor tested. When it is tested, only a carefully selected group will test the prototypes before signing it into production. I think it's been 4 or 5 years coming next year...bit like nuclear fusion? 3. You would be missing the ability to run it from a tank and have it in various positions in the home. Descaling would be much more difficult. As far as the Digital Preinfusion and app goes, you shouldn't be missing a lot. Although it's fair to say that with 1 spring much of the shot is at quite a low pressure, so the potential for 5 or 6 bar preinfusion might help with that. The problem is, if you do that, you're going to hit a bed of coffee that's already been extracting with about 7.5 bar when you raise the lever....not normally how you want to do things. The other thing you would be missing is the ability to do a bigger shot by "preinfusiing" at high pressure for longer...again questionable. 4. If you're talking about the Londinum, yes you can, but there is a big 2.3 litre uninsulated boiler running at 125C and a group losing heat. heat loss is a 4th power law, so that a high temperature boiler looses heat well, and it's not linear. The lack of any ventilation in the Londinium case helps a bit here, but with the downside that it must get very hot inside! The group runs quite a bit cooler than the Evo, or a Bianca, so you will save a tiny bit of energy there. The Bianca uses about 90W with the steam boiler switched off, you can do that because it's a dual boiler and just have it on when you want to steam milk. Saves energy and stress on the machine The Evo can be plumbed or tanked...if plumbed, it always fills the tank and stops...so the preinfusion pressure will remain at the user adjusted level, driven by the gear pump. The steam boiler on the Evo can be switched off, which saves energy so it uses only a little more than a Bianca (because the group is electrically heated and at brew temp). There is the advantage that you can switch the group and/or brew boilers off and save energy as the warm up time for the group is only 15m. I've tried to keep all this factual as best I can....There are of course vast differences in price/performance and flexibility between the different machines. As well as build cost...the Evo having a significantly higher factory build cost than the other 2 machines. To give just one example e.g. the Group on the Evo costs double that of the Londinium. The Evo and Bianca are both built by the owners own factories, and the owners are also designers....very clever ones.
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...